Growing Avocado Plants From Seed

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Introduction: Growing Avocado Plants From Seed

I love avocados and growing things, and found this to be a fun, simple way to grow beautiful-looking plants from the stones (pits) left over from making guacamole or avocado dip. It takes a while for a stone to grow into a tree, but you’ll have a beautiful houseplant pretty quickly.

There are two ways to start out your seeds:

  1. Perched over a cup of water (like the photo demonstrates)
  2. In dirt / soil (which grows faster than the water method)

You'll need:

  • Avocado seeds, rinsed from your last avocado meal
  • Toothpicks and jars for the water method
  • Dirt, gravel, and pots, trays, or garden space

Step 1: The Seed - Water Planting

This particular seed had sprouted inside of the avocado before I had even eaten it. Be careful to not cut any deep gouges when removing the seed. Clean it very well so there are no more bits of avocado flesh left on them (like there happens to be in this photo).

If you are using the toothpick method, stick three toothpicks in the side of the seed about halfway down. You want half of the avocado to be under water. Set it on the rim of a glass or jar and fill it up. The "bottom" is the fat end. Easy enough, right? Refill the water as it evaporates and keep the avocados in a bright window or outside. They will begin to sprout after anywhere from a few days to several months. One of my avocado seeds took three months to sprout, but I've never had one not sprout eventually. When roots begin to fill the glass, transplant the whole deal carefully into a pot.

Step 2: The Seed - Dirt Method

The dirt method is just as simple. If you are using a pot, put a little gravel or some pebbles in the bottom for excellent drainage. Avocados love water but they do not like soggy soil. Leave the top of the seed a little above the soil.

Step 3: Baby Plant

Soon enough your plant will be sprouting. This is a seed I water-planted and then moved into a pot.

Step 4: To Prune, or Not to Prune

Here is a plant that is just a little bit older. See how the different sets of leaves are developing? As they grow, some people recommend pruning the top bunch off to create a bushier plant. If you plan on keeping the plant inside (avocados make great houseplants!) you may want to do this to keep the size reasonable and to have a more attractive plant.

Step 5: Too Big for a Little Pot

These two shot up pretty fast as the weather warmed. Here in California we can grow these guys all year round, but most plants will not survive under 55-60 degrees. These plants are Hass avocados, and will probably need to be moved into bigger pots very soon.

Step 6: Watering & Enjoying

I was lucky enough to come across three Fuerte avocados (the most delicious, in my opinion). Although it can take several years to produce fruit - IF they ever do - I am keeping a watchful eye on these three plants in hopes they someday will. Avocados need a good watering, but do not like being watered small amounts daily. It is best to thoroughly soak the soil and then only water it again when it is beginning to dry. I've stuck to watering them every other day (or less). Watch your leaves carefully!

Good luck on your avocado planting and hopefully you will soon have a pretty, low-maintenance plant to decorate your home/garden. If you have any tips for me, please leave me a comment!

11 People Made This Project!

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134 Comments

0
nik24nik
nik24nik

Question 6 months ago on Introduction

Does this week need more water or less water? As you can see the tip of the leaves have started to brown. Thanks

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ms.ksmith37
ms.ksmith37

Answer 10 days ago

If the leaves are browning like that, you are over feeding it. What I have learnt is feed every ten days. Avocados are like Cactus's they don't need that much water.

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ms.ksmith37
ms.ksmith37

10 days ago

This is the story of my first picture.
I have always had a passion for wanting to grow an avocado plant, ever since I was twelve years old. I had a lot of downs when it came to growing them. Especially, in 2018 I grew a avocado plant and let's just say: it didn't do to well.
My first accomplishment didn't do well. So, I'm back and hopefully on the right track with a few questions to end my confusion.
I have watched and read many articles on growing an avocado plant, and this is where I become confused, pitch or cut. When is it the proper time to trim back for a plant. I have heard 12 inches and cut down to six. This is were I'm confused. reading multiple article's to watching multiple video's. I'm scared to cut back early if it's too early, or should I wait? I would appreciate any advice that is given.
The story behind my second photo, was should I pitch back or not. And I went ahead and pitch back. So, in the photo the leaves looked lifeless. Now the leaves are looking lively now. But, I still have questions about it because I don't want to give up. I went with potting the seed rather than, the water method. I'm still in need of some help here.

Avocado Plant  IG.jpgAvocado plant 3.JPG
0
Delser13
Delser13

4 years ago

Hi I Put This Seed Just In Dirt As If It Was In The Water It's Now 20" tall and likes the bathroom

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100121665
100121665

Reply 4 months ago

OMG

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Betty Ashley-Faith
Betty Ashley-Faith

Question 2 years ago on Step 6

I have tried the water method with several seeds, but have never had any success. Any tips?

0
100121665
100121665

Answer 4 months ago

depending on how much water you are putting

0
Lucky194u
Lucky194u

Answer 6 months ago

Paper towel method works flawlessly

0
Reataylor
Reataylor

Answer 8 months ago

You have to keep about half of the seed wet or it won't grow. Mine doesn't get a lot of light and I've been growing it for about 3 months and it is over a foot tall.

0
RobynD27
RobynD27

Answer 2 years ago

I rooted my avocado seed in a 8" tall x 3" plastic storage container. It rooted in 5 days. I run hot water into the container with a papertowell in the bottom folded into fours, seed on top of the 4 layers and one on top folded in half and half ripped off so its only 2 layers on top. It doesn't matter how the seed is positioned. I fill the container all the way with hot water then poor it all off until it drips once. and cap it off tight with a fitted lid. Put it someplace dark and warm. And in less than a week you will have a rooted avocado seed.

0
Vitalab
Vitalab

Tip 5 months ago on Introduction

Faster way to sprout the seed: put it in a wet piece of paper, and the put everything in a ziplock bag and store it in a dark place. After 5-6 weeks it should be ready to be planted.

0
LeeT40
LeeT40

5 years ago

I have had an avocado tree for the past 4 years which is currently 6 ft tall. Its never flowered, so are there any suggestions for getting it to flower?

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Reataylor
Reataylor

Reply 8 months ago

Grow another and hope its if the opposite sex. Avocados need to be grafted with the opposite sex or have a tree of the opposite sex grown near them.

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Mamamia04
Mamamia04

Reply 5 years ago

Try putting it in a fridge for a day or two then taking it out, this simulates winter and makes the plant think it has been through a whole year, if this doesn't work you can try doing it multiple times

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JessD16
JessD16

Reply 5 years ago

The guy did say his plant is six feet tall... how big is your fridge anyway?

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RiddhiB1
RiddhiB1

Reply 4 years ago

gave me a chuckle :P

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Mamamia04
Mamamia04

Reply 5 years ago

Haha sorry... Some fridges are big enough but I don't have any other suggestions.

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JessD16
JessD16

Reply 5 years ago

The guy did say his plant is six feet tall... how big is your fridge anyway?

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ConnieG34
ConnieG34

Reply 5 years ago

takes 15 years to get avocados 11 years to go be patient lol

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caitd3
caitd3

2 years ago

Many plants can be started from the original fruit. I have had luck with pomegranate, kiwi, Japanese Plum and dragon fruit so far. One never knows until you try.