How to Make an Epoxy Resin Tabletop

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Introduction: How to Make an Epoxy Resin Tabletop

About: Discover woodworking, concrete, LEDs, home decor and DIY projects you'll love.

In this project, I’ll be sharing my experience with creating a neat little epoxy resin table for my 2-year-old daughter.

The back story is she loves to follow me from room-to-room, and I love having her around me. Being a content creator, I am always on the computer trying to get work done. As long as I'm in her sight, that’s enough. I made her a desk awhile back, but that was too bulky to lug around. This is why this table came about. For our purpose, it’s a kid's table. For others this would make a perfect nightstand or end table. The same concept can be applied to any surface. The resin I’m using is from countertop epoxy. There is certainly many brands out there this is the one I have experience with. I went with epoxy because it’s durable and easy to maintain. The more layers you have the more you can wet sand it to remove scratches.


Projects Details:

Project's cost: $105
Estimated time: 3 days (approx 5 hours spent)
For additional details (tools used etc,) see the post on my site
diycreators.com

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Step 1: Getting Started

This was a two-part process. The first pour was the base (I went with white). After pouring the resin on the workpiece, I used a brush to evenly spread it. It also helps if you’re on a leveled surface. Now you’ll need to remove the bubbles. I tried a heat gun and I was not a fan, I like the torch better. This part is quite simple; start from one end then work your way to the other. Keep the torch moving, once you’re done it should look like glass. Now, begin your second pour, adding all the colors you will want to see in the mix. Once you’ve mixed the second container of epoxy, you will transfer it to a new container (I used plastic cups). Then is when you’re going to add your individual colors.

Step 2: Mixing the Epoxy

The epoxy used in the projects is a 1-to-1 mix. One part hardener; one part resin. If you check on the countertop epoxy website, you will find a chart to help you with square footage coverage. Twenty-four ounces of resin was just the right amount for this 24-inch table.

Here is the mixing process I used:

  • 12oz. Hardener part B +12oz.Resin Part A
  • Pour the hardener into a mixing cup first follow by the resin
  • Mix this for 5 minutes
  • Pour into a new container and add your base color and mix for 4 more minutes.
  • You’re now ready

You will repeat the same process for each pour. For the final coat, I just used the resin with no color.

Step 3: The First Pour

This was a two-part process. The first pour was the base (I went with white). After pouring the resin on the workpiece, I used a brush to evenly spread it. It also helps if you’re on a leveled surface. Now you’ll need to remove the bubbles. I tried a heat gun and I was not a fan; I like the torch better. This part is quite simple, start from one end then work your way to the other. Keep the torch moving -- once you’re done it should look like glass. Now, begin your second pour, adding all the colors you will want to see in the mix. Once you’ve mixed the second container of epoxy, you will transfer it to a new container (I used plastic cups). This is when you’re going to add your individual colors.

Step 4: The Second Pour

For the second pour, I used a dirty pour technique. I used a total of five colors, but you can pick all the colors you would want to see in the end result. I then took a piece of 4-inch pipe and placed it on the white base. Make sure you have everything prepped and ready-to-go, it’s best if you do all of this within 30 to 45 minutes of pouring the base.

Now, pour all the colors into the PVC pipe. Do not mix it!

Next, slightly spin and lift the PCV tube and push it in the desired path. It would help if you draw out a pattern path first, rather than to try and figure it out while in the motion. I kept it simple; I pushed the resin in one direction then back. You can try anything you like, swirling the pipe, zigzag, or whatever comes to mind. You can even tilt the workpiece to create movement in the design. Once you get the pattern you like, take the torch and remove the bubbles. Then, let this sit for 24 hours.

Step 5: Day Two

Inspect your work piece. If that looks good, then you are set. As I said in the video, I ran into some mishaps, so I had to address that before moving on. Had my process worked out in my favor I would have been done. Adding a layer of clear coat would only help, and I would still recommend it -- especially if you love the design. An additional clear coat adds protection. I’d recommend lightly sanding it with the following: 120-grit, 220-grit and 400-grit, prior to pouring the clear coat.

Remove the sand dust with a wet rag. Make sure the surface is dry. Mix up enough resin to cover the top and then pour it on the work surface. Take a brush and spread it, followed by the torch. Let this sit for 24 hours.

Step 6: Day Three

Clean up the hardened drips on the bottom.

Step 7: Add Legs

For this project, I used hairpin legs to keep things simple. Feel free to go in any direction.

Step 8: Final

Here is the finished product. Lia is enjoying her new table!

I hope you enjoyed this post if you did I would love to hear what you think about it. Let me know if you have any questions. Thanks for stopping by, and check out my links below to stay up today and see what’s next to come.

You can also find me here:
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    29 Discussions

    0
    MaintenanceC
    MaintenanceC

    2 months ago

    After adding up all the materials......it's about 130 now.....a bit step for a tiny table.
    I do love it though!

    0
    sshneyer89
    sshneyer89

    3 months ago

    I have a scratched up white modern lacquer table. Looking to pour a white epoxy finish. Can someone recommend how to achieve a new white layer and what materials are needed? Heat gun?
    Tabletop epoxy would be mixed with some kind of white non-toxic paint?
    Any recommendations on paint and the amount of paint to be used?
    Should I finish with bar counter epoxy for a more durable scratch-free surface?
    Is the finish in this tutorial prone to scratches like typical casting resins?

    Thank you!!!!

    IMG_2772.jpg
    0
    clanhay2002
    clanhay2002

    8 months ago

    Just WOW! I am totally going to try this.
    Thanks for confidence 😊

    2
    RyanW253
    RyanW253

    Question 1 year ago

    When putting the 2nd pour on the table top. Did it come our smooth and even with the white or was there little bit of a lip?

    0
    DonnaS256
    DonnaS256

    1 year ago

    Gorgeous! Love those colors!

    0
    JenniferK177
    JenniferK177

    2 years ago

    The table is beautiful! Great job! I look forward to trying something like this. :) Thank you for sharing.

    0
    Dream4real
    Dream4real

    2 years ago

    You, Sir , have a lot of class . Not a lot of us can show such modesty and fearless self criticism when we do screw up. You made this instructable a pleasure to watch. I learned a ton. You persevered and came out with a perfect finish. I'm not so afraid now to tackle
    something similar. You're a master. And I'll bet that little girl will go places too! Thanks

    0
    NativeElement
    NativeElement

    2 years ago

    What a mindful daddy you are!!

    The end result for this first time experience with the "dirty pour" (using more than one color of resin and pouring it) against the white background looks awesome! If you want to do fancier things with your dirty pour, the you tuber Myriam's Nature has some great videos about this topic. The only thing that I would have added would have been to paint the bottom surface of the table the same color as the hairpin legs so that the hairpin legs would blend in with the bottom surface of the table.

    As a result of your video, I am planning a trip to either Lowe's or Home Depot and looking for the round table tops.... and I wonder if I can make a series of graduated sized nesting circular tables. Thank you for the inspiration!

    0
    PaulD279
    PaulD279

    Question 2 years ago

    Thank you so much. May I ask please, what is the alcohol and what does it do?

    1
    marksstudio
    marksstudio

    2 years ago

    Excellent Instructable! Like how you repaired areas you were unhappy with as you went.

    0
    diycreators
    diycreators

    Reply 2 years ago

    Thank you

    0
    gusmom
    gusmom

    2 years ago

    Beautiful table you made, but it pales in comparison to that adorable little girl you helped create! Thank you for the instructable!

    0
    diycreators
    diycreators

    Reply 2 years ago

    :) Thank you.

    0
    DougD60
    DougD60

    2 years ago

    If you do this on a kitchen counter, will it withstand heat?

    0
    diycreators
    diycreators

    Reply 2 years ago

    I have not tried it myself but I was told it could. I will do an experiment on it.

    0
    kwhit190211
    kwhit190211

    2 years ago on Step 8

    Good job, it turned out real nice. But, I tell you this as a father of 3 beautiful daughters, your going to loose a lot of hair & sleep when she gets older, cause she is beautiful now. And, when they turn the evil 13, look out! :)

    0
    diycreators
    diycreators

    Reply 2 years ago

    Thank you, haha. I am going to enjoy the moments for now.