Homemade Edge Band Clamps

Introduction: Homemade Edge Band Clamps

About: Project videos and tutorials that show the creation of home decor and furniture. I specialize in DIY woodworking, building custom items for clients, friends, and family, showing a variety of woodworking tools…

If you work a lot with plywood or particle board, eventually you’ll need to apply a banding to cover the edges. Some people use iron on edge banding, while others like to make their own. Today, I’m going to show you how to quickly make a cool clamp that allows you to securely clamp your homemade edge banding to your plywood panels.

Supplies

You don't need a lot of materials for this project.

Step 1: Cut Rectangle Blocks

These clamps do not need to be a specific size. I would recommend that they be thicker than 3/4” because that’s the typical thickness of plywood. The length of the block is up to you. I made mine approximately six inches long and three inches wide.

Using a saw, cut at many blocks as you want clamps.

Step 2: Drill a Relief Hole

Using a drill press or handheld drill, drill a hole approximately 4/5th down the length of the block. I drilled a hole around 1/8” in diameter. The size of the hole just needs to be wider than the kerf that you will cut in Step 3 so it’s okay if you want to make a hole slightly bigger or smaller than I did.

Step 3: Cut a Kerf

At the bandsaw, or by using a handsaw, slice the block from the end to the hole that you drilled. Don’t cut beyond the hole. The relief hole allows you to drive a wedge into this kerf but the block won’t split.

Step 4: Make Wedges

Now, you need wedges to fit into the kerf that you just cut. I used some scrap wood to make some thin wedges. They don’t have to be very big. I would recommend that they are longer than the length of the slice that you cut.

Step 5: Cut a Notch for a Clamp

To hold the block onto your plywood panel, cut a notch to hold a F-style clamp. The brand and size of the clamp really isn’t important. Cheap clamps work great for this! At the midpoint of the block, cut a notch so that the bar of your clamp fits inside it. Make the notch as deep as your like. Just make sure that the clamp can reach past the block so it can clamp onto the plywood.

Step 6: Use Your New Clamps

You can now put your new clamps to work. Push your clamping block against your edge banding and tighten the F-style clamp. The edge banding may still wiggle if you touch it. Now, tap your wedge into the kerf of your clamping block. The wedge will push open the wooden block and apply a lot of pressure against the edge banding.

People often use blue tape or spring clamps with a rubber band on them when they apply edge banding. But with these blocks, you will get much more clamping pressure across the entire surface of the edge banding, in turn, getting much better results!

•• My Links ••

Website: https://genealogistwoodworker.com/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCC6IoQwiGlJ4K8TdcSMUzSg

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/genealogistwoodworker/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/genealogistwoodworker/

Esty: https://www.etsy.com/shop/GenWoodworker

Be the First to Share

    Recommendations

    • Metal Contest

      Metal Contest
    • Fandom Contest

      Fandom Contest
    • Make it Fly Challenge

      Make it Fly Challenge

    21 Comments

    0
    ironarmadillo
    ironarmadillo

    10 months ago

    This is a clever idea but it seems of limited use.

    I do a lot more edge type gluing than what you're addressing with your clamps. I usually use clamping cauls which can not only do edge banding but will also do for edge gluing wide boards together, for flattening joined board edges while they are gluing, for cabinet glue-ups and for anything else you can imagine, It only takes 2 regular clamps to use a clamping caul (one at each end) and it gives much better consistent gluing pressure across the entire length of the caul clamped joint. Using clamping cauls also eliminates the need to use biscuits, dominoes, dowels or splines to keep boards flat while they are gluing up.

    Clamping cauls are quite easy to make. I've included an image of instructions on how to make your own clamping cauls without spending $100's purchasing readymade ones.

    Clamping Cauls.jpg
    0
    antonio- g
    antonio- g

    10 months ago

    I love it . Very useful when long clamps are not available.

    0
    Bikergoody
    Bikergoody

    10 months ago

    Great idea; thanks for sharing. I've never tried edge banding before but I think it looks great and this would make it super easy to do.

    0
    JohnC430
    JohnC430

    10 months ago

    sorry to say but this is nonsense! If you are trying to put pressure on the slip of wood between the block that you made and the table, then all you have to do is put a block of wood on top of the slip of wood on the table and use the edge clamp to squeeze it down against the table. you will get the same pressure across the block of wood without having to make something special

    0
    alanjones
    alanjones

    Reply 10 months ago

    You haven't done much woodworking, have you, John. Sometimes one can't get clamps to the other side of the counter, or you don't have long enough clamps to reach across a table.

    0
    JohnC430
    JohnC430

    Reply 10 months ago

    I have done a LOT of woodworking.
    This clamp is intended to put equal pressure across the surface of whatever it is intended to clamp. you comment about not having the right size clamp is (now I should not say nonsense again) so it does not make sense. if you dont have the right size clamp then you will also not have the right size clamp to use his method and will not be able to do the job at all... sooo.... wow an amazing idea!!!!.... GO BUY the right size clamp,
    "reach across the table" he is not clamping the wood across the table. looks like you did not even understand what he is doing and u think I have not done a lot of woodworking? I would say a few choice words to describe your IQ but I will not waste any more time on you.

    0
    GenealogistWoodworker
    GenealogistWoodworker

    Reply 10 months ago

    Nonsense? That's not very nice, John. If you have criticism to provide then do it politely. Ask questions. Be smart. Be respectful of everyone and their ideas.

    0
    JohnC430
    JohnC430

    Reply 10 months ago

    your comment is correct. Sorry about that. I should not have said that. Thanks for pointing this out

    0
    ElectroFrank
    ElectroFrank

    10 months ago

    I am very concerned about the safety of your fingers when working on the bandsaw.
    I suggest that every Instructable should encourage safe working in every way.

    0
    GenealogistWoodworker
    GenealogistWoodworker

    Reply 10 months ago

    My fingers weren't anywhere near the blade. You are seeing a video/picture from a certain angle. I'm disappointed that this was your primary takeaway from the project. Safety is personal. No one is being forced to use tools that they are not comfortable using.

    0
    bjm1950
    bjm1950

    Reply 10 months ago

    Don't worry about comments like that mate!!
    This is the age of, no common sense, hold my hand, and you are responsible for my actions, never mind my stuppidity!! 😭😡, people have this attitude.
    I would assume that anybody who owns a band saw, router, jig saw, etc., knows how to use them, . If not, get lessons or cut one finger off by accident and you will soon learn.

    0
    Waste Of Space
    Waste Of Space

    Reply 10 months ago

    In my opinion, the band saw is the safest machine in my workshop.
    No extra safety precautions are needed.

    0
    alanjones
    alanjones

    10 months ago

    Great idea. They would work with c-clamps, also, which would give a higher clamping pressure. A wider slot for the "bar" may be necessary.

    0
    GenealogistWoodworker
    GenealogistWoodworker

    Reply 10 months ago

    It's so easy to batch these out and just have them around for when the time comes to use them.

    0
    gcai_fwb
    gcai_fwb

    10 months ago

    nice job! - simple, effective, and inexpensive

    0
    analogue brain
    analogue brain

    10 months ago

    thank you so much, this will be very helpful

    0
    GenealogistWoodworker
    GenealogistWoodworker

    Reply 10 months ago

    They are so simple to make and really help out with edge banding.