Homemade Fizzy Lemonade

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Introduction: Homemade Fizzy Lemonade

In my quest for a healthier lifestyle, I went looking for an alternative for my fizzy soft drink vice. In this instructable, we'll walk through the steps of making 2 liters of fizzy lemonade with ginger and lemon. I enjoy making and drinking this lemonade, and experimenting with different fruits and spices, and I hope you will too!

Supplies

    Tools

    • a cooking pot (at least 2L) & a cooking fire
    • a knife & a cutting board
    • 2x 1L fliptop bottles (mine are from Ikea) or recycled soft drink bottles
    • a spoon
    • a bowl
    • a funnel & a sieve

    Ingredients

    • 3 lemons
    • 80g fresh ginger
    • 2L water
    • 200gr white sugar
    • 3gr instant yeast

    optional

    • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
    • +/- 20 fresh mint leaves
    • 100gr of your favorite berries (tastes amazing with raspberry, blueberry, strawberry - and all of them combined!)

    Step 1: Dissolve the Sugar in Boiling Water

    Heat up 2 liters of water on a cooking fire until it boils. Add 200 grams of white sugar to the water and stir until it's completely dissolved. I recommend proceeding with the next steps while the water is warming up ;-)

    Step 2: Peel and Juice the Lemon

    We're going to use the peel and the juice of the lemons. First wash and peel the lemons. We want only the yellow-colored part of the peel, so remove the white from the inside of the peels (the white part of the peel would otherwise give an unpleasant bitter taste!). Then, juice the lemons, and keep the juice for a few steps later.

    Step 3: Peel and Slice the Ginger

    Peel the fresh ginger root, and cut in thin slices

    Step 4: Add Lemon Peels and Ginger Slices to Hot Water

    By now, the sugar should be completely dissolved in the boiling water. Turn of the cooking fire, so the water stops boiling. Add the lemon peels and ginger slices to the hot water, and stir for a little while. Allow the water to cool to about room temperature.

    We're basically making tea from the lemon peels and the ginger slices. You'll notice the water will get a pretty yellow color and a very lemony smell from the lemon peels.

    optional

    * Add a tablespoon of maple syrup

    * Throw your berries of choice, and mint leaves in a sieve. Put the sieve in the cooking pot. crush the berries with a spoon. Leave the sieve with the mint leaves and crushed berries in the pot for about 15 minutes. After that, remove the sieve and dispose of its remaining content.

    Step 5: Add Yeast and Lemon Juice (and Patience)

    When the water has reached room temperature, add the lemon juice and the yeast to the mixture. Now leave your brew at room temperature for about 24 hours, and stir gently once in a while. Now the yeast will get started eating away the dissolved sugar, and turn it into CO2.

    I decant my brew into a 2L glass jar, and put it onto the kitchen table with a piece of kitchen paper on top (so it can breathe, but doesn't catch dust). Everytime I walk by the jar, I stir it gently. Note that the room temperature has quite an influence on the speed the process; you may not have to wait for 24 hours on a hot day, or it may take two days when it's cold.

    Step 6: Bottling the Brew (and Some More Patience)

    After a while, your brew will noticeably start bubbling. Now it is time to sift out the lemon peels and ginger slices, and bottle your lemonade. Now leave the bottles closed for about 24 hours at room temperature to allow the bubble-making process to continue.

    It is important that you use bottles that allow for building up a bit pressure, because we want a bit of the CO2 gas to get trapped in the lemonade, and make it fizzy. I use flip-top bottles, but recycled soda pop bottles would do perfectly fine!

    Step 7: Enjoy a Refreshing Glass of Homemade Lemonade!

    Now, your lemonade is ready for consumption!

    I recommend putting your bottles in the fridge for a while before serving. Keep your lemonade in a cool place to disable the yeast; otherwise in a short while all sugar will be converted to CO2, resulting in a loss of favorable flavor, and unpleasantly squirting bottles.

    1 Person Made This Project!

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    20 Comments

    0
    WilliamS505
    WilliamS505

    6 weeks ago

    You really should make a disclaimer that by adding Yeast, you Are producing Alcohol. The longer you let the yeast ferment, the more alcohol you will have. A plain ginger bug would be better with far less alcohol, but yeast is an alcohol powerhouse even after 24 hours of fermenting

    0
    maria85
    maria85

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    So what do you suggest adding instead the yeast?

    0
    WilliamS505
    WilliamS505

    Reply 5 weeks ago

    If you want to skip fermentation altogether, then use club soda, sparking water, or tonic water. That will give you the purest option with no alcohol period

    0
    WilliamS505
    WilliamS505

    Reply 5 weeks ago

    You can make a ginger bug which can naturally ferment and produce carbonation. It will produce trace alcohol as well, but not in the strong and high amounts as a pack of yeast will produce. Straight yeast will give you far more alcohol

    0
    Salamyman
    Salamyman

    6 weeks ago

    Do you think this could also be done with oranges instead of lemons?

    0
    tom.santens
    tom.santens

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    Sure ;-)

    0
    Giselmarina
    Giselmarina

    6 weeks ago on Step 7

    Me gustaría que se descargaran en español. Gracias

    0
    GaynorL
    GaynorL

    Question 6 weeks ago

    How do disable the yeast?

    0
    WilliamS505
    WilliamS505

    Answer 6 weeks ago

    There are two ways to prevent yeast from continuing fermentation, a temporary cold method, and the permanent hot method. By putting the drink in a fridge, the years become inactive due to the cold, however, once the drink comes back to temperature, the yeast will continue to ferment, meaning this is only a temporary pause in fermentation. To permanently kill the yeast, you will need to basically pasteurize your drinks in a clean and sealed container, this is however risky and even extremely dangerous if done in an unsafe way or you are using bottles that are not made to handle the pressure (they will explode, even just the pressurizing fermentation risks bottles exploding under pressure)

    0
    kikaburra
    kikaburra

    Answer 6 weeks ago

    Putting it in the fridge will slow the fermentation almost to a stop, but it should still be drunk within a few days :)

    1
    tom.santens
    tom.santens

    Answer 6 weeks ago

    Pasteurization or cooling near freezing point should work. I just keep the bottles in the fridge ;-)

    4
    274167667
    274167667

    6 weeks ago

    Is this alcoholic at all?

    0
    WilliamS505
    WilliamS505

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    If it has yeast, you will be producing a level of alcohol, the longer it is left to ferment, the more alcohol will be produced

    0
    happyluckyidiot
    happyluckyidiot

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    Yes it will be by nature of the yeast converting sugar. However if you don’t let it ferment for very long it should be fairly negligible. At a guess less than 1%. When I make ginger beer in a similar way, I put it straight into the bottle, seal and drink it as soon as some pressure has built up for the fizz. Usually a day or two. HTH

    0
    zsomborteimer
    zsomborteimer

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    It probably is, since with yeast, when feed it with sugar, it can produce ethanol as a result of "eating" the sugar

    1
    tom.santens
    tom.santens

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    A while ago I was wondering the same, so I drank a glass of this lemonade and immediately after took a breathalyzer test; it read 0,0! =)

    0
    kikaburra
    kikaburra

    6 weeks ago

    This looks tasty! Is it still pretty sweet by the end?

    0
    tom.santens
    tom.santens

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    I've been making this recipe for a while, and usually I consume my 2 bottles within a week =P within this period the lemonade has a bit of a sweet taste. After some time it's noticeable that the sweetness is gone, and the lemonade becomes more sour (because of the lactic acid produced by the yeast, I guess).

    1
    jessyratfink
    jessyratfink

    7 weeks ago

    This sounds super refreshing! Favoriting to try later :D

    0
    tom.santens
    tom.santens

    Reply 6 weeks ago

    Thanks a lot for your supportive gesture ^^