Homemade Mozzarella Cheese From Milk Powder

Introduction: Homemade Mozzarella Cheese From Milk Powder

About: Hello and Welcome to In the Kitchen With Matt. I am your host Matt Taylor. My goal for the show is to teach you how to cook really good food at home for cheap. Eating out everyday can get expensive, but it doe…

In this Instructable, I will show you how to make homemade mozzarella cheese from milk powder. This powdered milk mozzarella cheese recipe only requires 5 ingredients. I also use classic cheesemaking ingredients like citric acid and rennet. Making mozzarella cheese from scratch at home is fairly easy to do, and one of the easiest cheeses to make. If I can do it, you can do it. Let's get started!

If you would like to learn how to make mozzarella cheese with just 2 ingredients, milk and vinegar check out this Instructable.

Don't forget to follow me and check out my other Instructables.

Follow the steps below or watch the video tutorial or do both. :)

Step 1: Ingredients

Ingredients:

  • Half Gallon of water, use filtered if you have it (1892 mL) plus 1/4 cup water for the rennet and 1/4 cup water for the citric acid
  • 3 cups milk powder (375 g)
  • 1/2 of a rennet tablet
  • 1 tsp of citric acid powder
  • 6 Tbsp butter

Tools:

  • Large pot
  • Slotted spoon
  • Cheesecloth (optional)
  • Collander (optional)
  • Paper Towel
  • Sheet Pan or Baking pan
  • Thermometer

The above link is an affiliate link, as an Amazon Affiliate Associate I earn on qualifying purchases.

Step 2: Make the Milk

Begin by making the milk. Add the water to a large pot then take the milk powder, and slowly incorporate it into the water. I really recommend using filtered water, unless your tap water tastes good.

Use a slotted spoon or other spoon and slowly stir. Don't agitate or stir too hard, it will create too many bubbles that you don't want.

If you like you can make the milk the night before and let it sit in the fridge before using it.

Step 3: Melt the Butter

Since I am using non-fat dry milk powder I need to add some fat into the milk. Take the butter and melt it just until barely melted in the microwave or in a pot on the stovetop.

Then take about a cup of the milk and heat it up until it is around 110F (43C) it doesn't have to be exact. The main thing is you don't want to pour the melted butter into cold milk. So heat the cup of milk up first.

Combine the two and either whisk it really well for 1 minute or put it in a blender and blend it for a minute.

Step 4: Add the "buttered Milk" to the Main Milk

Now slowly pour and add the buttered milk into the main pot of milk. Again, don't stir super quickly and agitate it too much, this will create unwanted bubbles.

Step 5: Heat the Milk

Heat the pot of milk slowly over medium-low heat until it reaches right around 90F (32 C). Stir gently so the milk heats up evenly. Use a thermometer to check the temp.

Step 6: Mix and Cover

Once the milk has heated up, remove the pot from the burner and turn the heat off.

Add 1/4 cup of filtered water or good tap water to a small bowl and then add the citric acid to it. Stir until dissolved. Add the citric acid to the pot of warm milk. Gently stir for about 30 seconds. You will begin to see curds form.

Then smash up the half tablet of rennet in a bowl with the back of a spoon, or use a mortar and pestle if you have it. Add that rennet powder to a bowl with 1/4 cup of water, just like you did with the citric acid.

Mix it until it dissolves, then pour it into the pot of milk. Again, gently stir for about 30 seconds.

Cover the pot, and allow it to sit for 30 minutes up to 2 hours. You really need to give the curds time to develop. The time doesn't have to be exact either. So this works perfectly if you need to leave to run errands.

Step 7: Cut the Curd

Once the curd has had time to develop, remove the lid and use a long knife, I always use my bread knife and cut the curd into 1/2 to 1-inch cubes.

This process is different than what I showed in the 2-ingredient mozzarella cheese demonstration and is the classic way of making cheese. You can follow this same process with raw milk or whole milk (not ultra-pasteurized) instead of using powdered milk and butter.

Step 8: Heat the Curd

Time to heat up that curd.

Place the pot back on the burner and set the heat to medium-low. Instead of stirring the curd, rotate the pot which will move the curd around.

Heat the curd until it reaches between 110 and 115 F (43 to 46).

Step 9: Separate the Curds From the Whey

Once the curds have heated up to the proper temp, remove the pot from the burner. Time to separate the curds from the whey. The yellowish liquid you see is whey.

Use a slotted spoon and scoop out the curd. Place it in a colander lined with cheesecloth. Also, make sure to have a sheet pan or roasting/baking pan under the colander to catch the whey that drains out.

Now fold up the corners of the cheesecloth and squeeze the curds, this will release the whey. Do this a few times until you get most of the whey out. At first, the volume of the curds will be heavy and feel very soft. As you squeeze the volume will decrease and the curds will get firmer.

Pour the curds into a microwave-safe bowl.

Step 10: Heat, Stretch, Drain, Shape

Now for the really fun part, or at least I think it is the fun part. We need to heat and shape and stretch the cheese. This is what will turn the curd into cheese and give it that classic mozzarella texture.

Place the pot of curd in the microwave and heat for 1 minute on high. This should bring the temp to right around 160 to 165F (71 to 73 C).

You will see a pool of whey around the cheese. This is good. Use a spoon and press the cheese on the side of the bowl releasing more whey, then dump the whey out.

Smash the cheese and stretch it in the bowl, it will probably be too hot to handle at first. Then using clean hands or wear gloves, knead and stretch the cheese. You will wind up doing this for 3 to 5 minutes. You may need to put it back in the microwave as it cools down because the cheese will get harder as it cools.

Finally add in a bit of cheese salt, flaky sea salt, or crushed kosher salt. Then knead the cheese again so the salt gets mixed in.

Shape the cheese into a ball, it should look nice and smooth and a little shiny. There you go, you just made homemade mozzarella cheese from milk powder.

Step 11: Cool and Serve

Place the cheese ball completely covered in a bowl of cool water for about 10 minutes. After that add some ice to the bowl to further chill the cheese for another 10 minutes.

Wrap it with plastic wrap and then place it in a sandwich bag or Tupperware and store in the fridge to use later. It will taste a little better the next day. But you can also eat it now if you like.

Slice that cheese and eat it! Or it will shred easily if really cold or frozen. Enjoy!

You can print the recipe here if you want.

Step 12: Video Tutorial

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    21 Comments

    0
    mikeavison
    mikeavison

    Question 17 days ago

    Can you tell me why you add citric acid and rennet? As you say the curds form after the citric acid is added, but I always believed the only purpose of rennet was to form the curds. What would happen if you only used citric acid or only used rennet? Could you use another acid such as cider vinegar? Thanks

    0
    In The Kitchen With Matt
    In The Kitchen With Matt

    Answer 17 days ago

    Hi Mike! I have another Instructable that shows how to make mozzarella with just vinegar and milk. However, the Rennet develops "better" curds. The citric acid (or yes you can use vinegar) raised the acidity of the milk which is important in cheese making.

    0
    silver55
    silver55

    27 days ago

    Buono, solo a scopo di conoscenza e sperimentazione, ma meno male che per il momento è vietato farlo in Italia.

    0
    ochetski
    ochetski

    Reply 27 days ago

    Thanks for the warning! But just as well to use 金 which means gold for a "silver" nickname would be weird in Japan. 銀 can be more appropriate. ;)

    0
    silver55
    silver55

    Reply 27 days ago

    Thanks, I know that monogram means gold. It was a translation error more than 50 years ago, when I realized it I had already used it as an ex libris and signatures, by now I was fond of it. You're the first who saw it and pointed it out to me.

    0
    ochetski
    ochetski

    Reply 26 days ago

    Great to know you were aware already. On another subject, I propose to you, as an Italian, share us some proper recipes. Would love to see that.

    0
    In The Kitchen With Matt
    In The Kitchen With Matt

    Reply 27 days ago

    Yes, if you don't have to use milk powder, using fresh milk is better. But if all you have is milk powder, it is nice to know that you can still make cheese with it.

    0
    DesKelly007
    DesKelly007

    27 days ago

    This looks fantastic, Matt! I need to get back into the kitchen and try this

    0
    EruwaedhielElleth
    EruwaedhielElleth

    27 days ago

    Is it possible to use full fat powdered milk, (like Nido) or must it be non-fat?

    0
    In The Kitchen With Matt
    In The Kitchen With Matt

    Reply 27 days ago

    Hi there! I haven't tried it with full fat powdered milk, but I don't see why it wouldn't work, if anything it will work better. You still may need to add the butter, just in case.

    0
    EruwaedhielElleth
    EruwaedhielElleth

    Reply 27 days ago

    I'm pretty sure I'll have to still add butter, I have made farm cheese with Nido before, but it by itself would not set the kind of curds that could be stretched into mozzerella. I wasn't sure if there was anything about non-fat (perhaps the way it is processed or anything like that) that made it work better. Thanks!

    0
    mako99
    mako99

    4 weeks ago

    It is never explained WHY one would want to make cheese with powdered milk, as opposed to just regular milk? Powdered milk is more expensive and harder to find where I’m from.

    0
    In The Kitchen With Matt
    In The Kitchen With Matt

    Reply 27 days ago

    I mentioned it in the video, someone asked me in my other cheese video, which I linked to in this Instructable, if making cheese was possible with milk powder. Because the opposite is true in other countries, powdered milk is cheaper for them, and fresh milk is very hard to come by. Especially countries that don't have a lot of dairy farms, cattle, etc. You can of course use regular milk, just skip the butter, and of course you won't be adding water and powder to it. But everything else will be the same.

    0
    Moomoo50
    Moomoo50

    Question 4 weeks ago on Introduction

    Hi Matt,
    I'm going to try this! By weight, how much cheese does this recipe make?
    Thanks, Lynda

    0
    In The Kitchen With Matt
    In The Kitchen With Matt

    Answer 27 days ago

    Hi Lynda! Good luck! Let me know how it turns out. It makes right around 8 to 10 oz of cheese.

    0
    ericocean
    ericocean

    4 weeks ago

    This is fabulous. I will definitely make this. I can almost taste it already. Great and clear 'ible.

    0
    lorenkinzel
    lorenkinzel

    4 weeks ago

    Alright Matt! Looks good. I know the butter was extracted from milk, but does its' use in this method add any buttery flavor? I bet the ricotta extracted from the whey is good as well.
    Realizing that you can adjust the fat level in milk just changed alot of things for me.
    Ultra high fat feta, coagulated kefir, etc.
    You've always had some pretty good articles (even the "not fake" churros) but I find this one pretty exciting. I'm sure mileage may vary.