Homemade Spin Art Machine

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Introduction: Homemade Spin Art Machine

Spin Art Machines have been around for a while and I have seen them at craft shows for years.

You could buy a Spin Art machine for anywhere from $12 to $282 depending on the size and quality of the machine.

If you have a spare box fan and some card board, you can make your own at home for pennies on the dollar!

Step 1: Acquire Supplies

1. Box Fan - any size (16", 20", etc) : http://www.walmart.com/ip/Galaxy-20-Box-Fan-4733/10553592?findingMethod=rr

2. Corrugated Cardboard - I used the cardboard from a Husky air compressor cardboard box. Should be stiff

3. Chipboard - The size of the chipboard sheets depends on the size of the cardboard base cutout above. Use small chipboard sheets from Michaels or other craft store.

4. Push pins - Holds the chip board during spinning to the cardboard

5. Acrylic Paint

6. Mustard and / or Plastic Ketchup Bottles - Used to squirt paint onto spinning canvas (http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=ketchup+bottles&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=2210169627730432471&sa=X&ei=DvW8T5D3HoOpgweSx-H3Dg&ved=0COcBEPMCMAA)

7. Small screws - for attaching cardboard base to fan

8. Phillips screwdriver or Drill with phillips drill bit

9. Large cardboard box - to catch overspray

Step 2: Remove Front and Back Fan Grills

Remove the front and back fan grills using a small phillips screwdriver and discard into trash.

Step 3: Cut Fan Blades

Using a dremel or other similar tool, slice existing fan blades from unit. Discard blades into trash. It's ok if you have a little excess "stump" from the blades.

Step 4: Cut 8" X 8" Cardboard Base

Using corrugated cardboard, cut approximately 8" x 8" and ensure it fits on top of white, circular disc in fan.

Step 5: Attach Cardboard Base to Fan

Using at least 4 small metal screws, attach cardboard base to fan. If screws are too long and fan does not spin, then you need to use smaller screws. You may have to use trial / error here. I noticed that in some spots, I could not drill into because it prevented the fan from spinning. Back out screw and try a new location.

Step 6: Test Machine!

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    12 Discussions

    0
    jimstr
    jimstr

    Question 2 months ago

    Good basic start of the construction but on testing the paint does not distribute evenly so the end result is heavier application of paint and some valleys with no paint. I saw other designs used a round wood disc that was adhered to the spinner to make it more flat. Any ideas? I saw someone else ask if multiple layers of cardboard were needed. I tried a record album/lp but same problem

    0
    brian25
    brian25

    Answer 2 months ago

    No issues here - I remade this many years later for Art Night this past Fall using same technique. Just cut an Amazon box into a square and drill into fan housing. Use walls of a large box or make walls yourself out of cardboard to catch splatter. We used thumb tacks and chipboard. Add a little water to your paint and use bottles from craft store like beauty bottles and fill with craft paint of different colors.

    0
    jimstr
    jimstr

    Reply 2 months ago

    The machine part works fine but not even coverage. See photo. I think it is because the spinning surface is not completely flat.

    IMG_1859 (1).jpg
    0
    brian25
    brian25

    Reply 2 months ago

    Looks like your surface may be too big. We used chipboard. I would also try to apply more paint as it spins to get more coverage. As the paint hits the surface, it is going to get thrown inside and out. Kids seem to like the effect. We never got a complaint on coverage.

    0
    mvieke
    mvieke

    7 years ago on Introduction

    Show some videos. This looks like a blast for kids. Very cool idea.

    1
    brian25
    brian25

    Reply 2 months ago

    I added a video to the last step

    0
    LindaM3
    LindaM3

    6 years ago on Introduction

    Step 4 Is it necessary to have several layers of the cardboard to affix to the fan? If so how many? Am I to guess the instruction meant to say 8-8"x8" cardboard pieces. If so what do I use to adhere layers of cardboard to each other. Instructions could have been a little clearer.

    0
    brian25
    brian25

    Reply 2 months ago

    Nope, just one layer is fine. Attach chipboard to cardboard using push pins. Works great

    0
    YUJMU
    YUJMU

    5 years ago on Introduction

    I set one of these up as a Middle School Art Teacher for my students after another teacher had a box fan fall out of a window and couldnt be used anymore but still worked. The kids LOVED it of course, the tricky part was getting the cardboard and paper to not come loose while it spun.

    0
    DanielS49
    DanielS49

    5 years ago on Introduction

    Using a smaller fan, such as a desk fan with lower RPM's, is best for more control and less over spray. Also i suggest mounting it to a piece of plywood and setting it inside of the box with a slit in 1 corner to allow cords to come in and out easily for cleanup and removal to put away. I also used a piece of acrylic and Gorilla glued it onto my fans motor. using office clips and a piece of acrylic the size of office paper (but square to be more evenly balanced) you can then use standard office printer paper as your surface. Kids love making them and its fun and easily cleaned up. Just toss the box out and clean the fans surface acrylic and your basically done!

    0
    person%
    person%

    8 years ago on Introduction

    cool! i could make a mini one of these and it will help me with art homework