How to Properly Halter a Horse Introduction

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Introduction: How to Properly Halter a Horse Introduction

Hi, my name is Jenna Loebs. Have you ever been on a farm or around horses? I’m here to show you how to properly halter a horse so you can handle them, lead them, and tie them up safely. I’m going to elaborate in 5 steps how to properly halter a horse. If the halter is too loose, the horse may accidentally get their hoof/leg stuck in the halter in they put their head down and take a step or step down. It could potentially possibly also get caught on something also, such as a fencepost. If the halter is too tight, it will cause irritation and rub on them and cause pain or injury and bad behavior from the discomfort

Supplies

The supplies you will need for this task are a halter, a lead rope, and of course a horse! :)

Step 1: Step 1: Approaching the Horse

First, approach the horse. Pet the horse gently. Horses often like to smell your hand and if you have something in your hands they like to smell that. I usually let the horse smell the halter while I'm petting him/her to he/she knows what it is. Make sure the halter and the lead rope are in your left hand. The lead rope should be attached to the tie ring which is located on the bottom of the halter. Stand on the left side of the horse by his/her head and neck.

Step 2: Step 2: Gaining Control

Secondly, while still holding the halter and lead rope in the left hand. Place the loose end of the lead rope over his/her neck. DO NOT SWING OR THROW IT OVER. That could scare them or hit and hurt them. Now that the loose end of the lead rope is over his/her neck, gather the loose end of the lead rope with the other part of the lead rope that is on the left side into the right hand. Having the lead rope around his/her neck is there incase he/she tries to wander off while the halter is being put on.

Step 3: Step 3: Having Control While Haltering

Then, just let the lead rope hang over his/her neck but so it’s still easy to grab both ends if the horses tries to wander off. Do not let the loose end of the lead rope hang on the ground because they may be difficult to grab and have control if the horse tries wandering off and the horse may accidentally step on it if they take a step or step down.

Step 4: Step 4: Haltering

Now, while still standing on the left side, grab the two sides of the halter where the cross tie rings are. Those are going to be on the sides of the horses’ face/cheeks when the haltering process is done. Keep right hand on right side, left hand on left side. Remember, the “O” shaped ring (tie ring) should be on the bottom of the halter, facing the ground with the lead rope attached. Position the noseband so the horses’ nose will slide easily into it. Raise the halter into position being very careful it’s not too tight. Pull it up just enough to where it won’t go up anymore.

Step 5: Step 5: Haltering Continued..

Lastly, once the halter is up and in position, the buckle is on the left side of the horse and the straps and holes are on the right side. Once the halter is up and into place, grab the buckle with left hand holding just enough pressure the halter won’t slide/fall off. Using the right hand, flip the straps with the holes over the horses’ neck just behind the ears. This part can be a bit challenging sometimes. When the strap is over the horses’ neck, just behind the ears, grab it with left hand and buckle into the buckle making sure it’s not too tight and not too loose. TIP: make sure the halter fits properly. Too tight could choke them and cause irritation and too loose may cause them to get caught in a fence post or something similar. The noseband should lie two fingers below the cheekbone and three fingers should fit between the horse and nose band.

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    6 Comments

    0
    ckav
    ckav

    10 months ago

    Your horse just got cast from an overturned trailer, collapsed shelter etc. off it's legs, head and neck stretched to the still attached lead rope . You A. have a sheepsfoot type knife and hopefully cut the lead free without injury to you or horse from thrashing legs and even this 'safe' blade. B. you DO NOT tuck the halter strap into the lower buckle loop but leave it free below the prong. You have now eliminated any possibility of 1200lbs of Palomino tension on the halter and trying to undo it. A simple jerk and it pops free. Yes, it looks sloppy and some HALTER CLASS judge better off at home with her BRYER collection will penalize you or helpfully correct this noobie while your back is turned or lecture while her glittering Dressage sweater attracts flies. Your safety- both is more important.

    0
    Civvydog
    Civvydog

    10 months ago on Introduction

    A little tip, always make sure the clip on the lead rope is facing backwards as this will stop it embedding itself in your horses chin if he pulls backwards, also if using baler twine to act as a weak point between the rope and the tying up ring thin it down as it's not designed to break easily.

    0
    seamster
    seamster

    11 months ago

    Well done, this is a good write up. Nice to see!

    Thanks!!

    0
    jennaloebs
    jennaloebs

    Reply 11 months ago

    Thank you!!

    0
    StumpChunkman
    StumpChunkman

    11 months ago

    I would love to see images showing what you're describing. I'm having a little trouble picturing some of the steps. Thank you for sharing!

    0
    jennaloebs
    jennaloebs

    Reply 11 months ago

    Hello!! I am in college and I did this for a school project! I will be uploading pictures and videos to show and to better describe it!! Today, we were required to put our steps together and random pictures on and to upload/publish it!! On Monday, November 2nd, I should be able to have the photos and video(s) uploaded on to better explain!! Thank you for the comment!!😊