How to Talk in Old English(updated: 4 Time(s)

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Introduction: How to Talk in Old English(updated: 4 Time(s)

About: i love spaypainting alot of stuff.i just like alot of the food on here too.pretty gourmet.i intrest in taking stuff apart to see how it works.i also enjoy making plastic models.

in this instructable you will learn to talk in old english.
Hath thou intrestedith?
what you will need is some time to read this.

Step 1: Words

hath:how,why,when
yonder:over there or afar
thou:you,your
Thy:me,my,i
Verily:quickly
huzzah(hurrah):a celebration yell
ye:the
art:Are
betwixst:between
dost:does
nary:never
nigh:near
hither:here
beseech:beg
prithee:please
thine:your
whence:where
wilt:will
yonder:over there or afar
tither:there
wert: were
Naught:naughty
shalt:shall

Step 2: Coumpound Word

Shan`t without a compound is shall not.
Mightn't without a compound is might not.
Also,depending on how proper you are,you can also just not use compounds at all.

Step 3: Grammer (er,erm,ith)

grammer(sort of) er/erm is for when you can`t come up with a good word while your kind of thinking
aloud.ith you add to every other word unless its er erm hath shan`t thy thou and any others from earlier
add 'e' to words that sound like they have an 'e'.

Step 4: Spelling

spell evere worde (every word) lieka(like)it sounds.
Huzzah! thou shalle speeke ine newithe englishe!

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    22 Comments

    0
    admin
    admin

    12 years ago

    This is a great Instructable, but you need to add a main image of the final project to the intro step. Please do that and leave me a message when you have so that we can publish your work. Thanks!

    0
    admin
    admin

    12 years ago

    Hey, this is a great instructable and is very informative. Just one thing is missing... pictures! It really helps a lot when trying to follow directions so you should consider taking some photographs. Once you do that and leave me a message when you have so that we can publish your work. Thanks! Thanks for the cool instructable and we hope to publish this soon!

    0
    admin
    admin

    12 years ago

    Hey, this is a great instructable and is very informative. Just one thing is missing... pictures! It really helps a lot when trying to follow directions so you should consider taking some photographs. Once you do that and leave me a message when you have so that we can publish your work. Thanks! Thanks for the cool instructable and we hope to publish this soon!

    0
    shanahanjim53
    shanahanjim53

    1 year ago on Step 1

    Verily, as best I understand it, does NOT mean: quickly, but rather it means: truly. It is an archaic form of English word deriving from the latin word: veritas, which means: truth, as in the old latin phrase, "In vino veritas". Verily is an an adverb, that is it modifies the verb. Sometimes it might be used in an exclamation of agreement, such as, "Verily, what you say is right". Verily, this error should be corrected in the above word list, or so I believe.

    0
    Scrubby Cs
    Scrubby Cs

    1 year ago on Step 1

    Did thou look at naught? For thou hast over looked a few parts

    0
    ClarkL12
    ClarkL12

    Question 2 years ago on Step 2

    How do i say, are you going to the same school next year

    0
    nl085
    nl085

    Question 3 years ago

    Also.. Where'd you get that cool sword?? ;3

    0
    nl085
    nl085

    3 years ago

    Great job!! I was really looking for a good website like this to help me with my report(I'm supposed to write it in "ye olde english") It was so helpful, and all of the other websites were all yuck!

    0
    BTSa2
    BTSa2

    3 years ago

    Um, I know I'm late, but I just wanted to say, this isn't old english. This is olde english, which is basically modern english with old english influences. this is also a very modified, shakesperian version of olde english.

    0
    KuziKetsepI
    KuziKetsepI

    4 years ago

    This isn't Old English, this is English with some archaic isms. It looks more like Shakespeare's English than Old English. Old English was an inflected language spoken by the Anglo-Saxons, who came to the British Isles around 400 AD. It uses almost exclusively Germanic-stemmed vocabulary and is almost indistinguishable from today's English in both grammar, spelling and pronunciation.

    Here's an example of Old English, it's a riddle in the form of a short poem:

    Ic þa wiht geseah on weg feran;

    heo wæs wrætlice wundrum gegierwed.

    Wundor wearð on wege; wæter wearð to bane.

    It translates to today's English as:

    I saw a being travelling on its way;
    it was adorned amazingly beautifully.
    A marvel occurred on the road: water turned to bone.

    0
    ChristopherE65
    ChristopherE65

    4 years ago

    You messed up thou and thy. The correct is: thou (subject) and thee (object = you.
    Thy (before a noun starting with a consonant) and thine (before a noun starting with a vowel) = your

    0
    TiahnaV
    TiahnaV

    5 years ago

    yonder:over there or afar

    this is repeated.

    tither:there

    This is spelled thither, not tither

    0
    NickV1
    NickV1

    6 years ago on Introduction

    I want to learn old english. Not early modern english.

    0
    cfeldner
    cfeldner

    10 years ago on Introduction

    This is early modern english. This is certainly not old english, or even middle english for that matter.

    wes þu hal!! (May you be whole)

    0
    The Jamalam
    The Jamalam

    12 years ago on Introduction

    you forgot ye! Many people see ye on the front of a pub, but that was the 27th letter in the alphabet pronounced th, the origin of the

    0
    pharoah
    pharoah

    Reply 11 years ago on Introduction

    Actually, it's called thorn: þ

    0
    dwhp
    dwhp

    Reply 12 years ago on Introduction

    thank you! i honestly did forget.

    0
    dwhp
    dwhp

    Reply 12 years ago on Introduction

    ok,read it again.you`ll find a diffrence.