Intensil: an Intense Utensil Set

Introduction: Intensil: an Intense Utensil Set

This is a reusable utensil set that includes the capability to become two straws, a chopstick set, a fork, knife, or spoon. By turning all of these devices into only 2 utensils, the set is able to be slim and fit in your backpack or purse to be brought anywhere. The chopsticks will act as a base, with the inside hollow so that they can also be used as a straw. Using a compression fit, the internal end of the chopstick can be attached to a fork, spoon, or knife tip. All of the utensils can be 3D printed. Additionally, a compact container holds the utensil set. So the container is made out of fabric with elastic bands to hold the utensils in place. This can then be easily folded up to keep the utensils clean while transporting, and it can easily be washed in a laundry machine.

Supplies

3D Printer and Plastic: To make the utensils

Sand paper: To sand down the utensils

Sewing Needle and Thread: To sew the container

2 Fabrics and a Button : To create the container

Elastic bands: To hold the utensils in the container

Step 1: Print the Straws.

Create a design in Fusion for the Straw. There should be a gradient, with the top measuring 9 mm and the bottom tip measuring 6 mm. The length of the straw should be 190 mm. Then, hollow the middle of the cone-shaped cylinder. Ensure the walls of the straw is thick enough to be printed.

Follow the next steps to design a fork, knife and spoon. Or, using the files above, print them without needing to design them.

Step 2: Print the Fork.

Using a utensil set on Thingiverse (https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:226875), upload a fork design to Tinkercad and remove the handle part. Create a cylinder in place of the handle measuring 20 mm in length and 5 mm in diameter. The fork structure should measure 65 mm in length and 25 mm in width.

Move the design to Cura to create a gcode file that may be 3D printed.

Test the printed design to ensure the cylinder fits inside the larger end of the straw.

Sand the fork down until it is smooth and comfortable to eat with.

Step 3: Print the Spoon.

Using a utensil set on Thingiverse, upload a spoon design to Tinkercad and remove the handle. Create a cylinder in place of the handle measuring 20 mm in length and 5 mm in diameter. The spoon structure should measure 59 mm in length and 36 mm in width.

Move the design to Cura to create a gcode file that may be 3D printed. Test the printed design to ensure the cylinder fits inside the larger end of the straw.

Sand the spoon down until it is smooth and comfortable to eat with.

Step 4: Print the Knife.

Using a utensil set on Thingiverse, upload a butter knife design to Tinkercad and remove the handle part. Create a cylinder in place of the handle measuring 20 mm in length and 5 mm in diameter. The knife structure should measure 100 mm in length and 18.73 mm in width.

Move the design to Cura to create a gcode file that may be 3D printed. Test the printed design to ensure the cylinder fits inside the larger end of the straw.

Sand the knife down until it is smooth and comfortable to eat with.

Step 5: Sew the Utensil Container.

Using two squares of fabric measuring 10 in by 7 in, lay them out with the outside of the fabric face up. Determine which fabric should be the inside. Place your utensils on the inside fabric and decide where they would fit best. Make light pencil marks measuring the widths of the utensils and then place the elastic string across the inside fabric. Sew the elastic string to the fabric, while leaving the parts where the utensils would sit disconnected from the fabric.

Placing the two nice sides of the fabric against each other, sew together three sides of the fabrics to each other 0.5 in from the edge. Reverse the insides of the fabric and now sew the fourth layer. Flip the bottom edge that was last sewn up so that they overlap by an inch and now sew the ends to the other fabric. Now, place the utensils inside the elastic straps and roll the container. Determine the position in which it will close and sew a button to the fabric and a string circle to the other part of the fabric.

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    5 Comments

    0
    DA_BRINK
    DA_BRINK

    11 months ago

    Is PLA safe to put in your mouth?

    0
    StringGoddess
    StringGoddess

    Reply 11 months ago

    White or natural PLA is considered safe for food contact. The problem is that 3D printing is done in layers, which can trap and grow bacteria, and PLA can't be cleaned in a dishwasher- the high temperature will distort the item.

    0
    InarcoC
    InarcoC

    11 months ago

    Hi. I have noticed that, when I design any part with walls smaller than 1mm, walls are not printed. How did you manage to print the straw?

    0
    Alex in NZ
    Alex in NZ

    11 months ago

    Brilliant idea! Thank you for sharing it :-)

    0
    seamster
    seamster

    11 months ago

    Clever, nicely done! : )