Key Wind Chime

Introduction: Key Wind Chime

Upcycle your old keys into a subtle and tinkling wind chime! If you haven't enough keys, ask your local locksmith or hardware store for any miss-cut keys; they often have boxes or bins that are full. This wind chime can make a unique gift, and is a fun activity for families.

To begin, insert screw eyes near the ends of the twig.

Fold the cover stock in half, and secure the fishing line near the top. I used a knot on the top of the paper to keep it straight, and the glue gun to glue the paper edges together.

Add a key about an inch above the paper. Tie a double knot in the fishing line, allowing the key to move loosely, if possible. Add another key above that one so that the two keys touch /overlap slightly. Again, secure with double knots. Continue, with each key touching the last one, until there are about six keys on the line.

For the next two strands of fishing line, continue in the same manner--begin at the bottom and add keys "up" the line.

When all three lines are complete, add a drop of hot glue to each knot. Tie the lines on the twig at equal intervals between the screw eyes, with the "paper" line in the middle. Again, use the hot glue to solidify the knots. Tie a final piece of monofilament through the screw eyes for hanging. Hot glue these, as well.

Hang the chime in an area that will catch a little wind, and enjoy!

Supplies:

Supplies are simple: old keys, a twig or part of a sturdy branch, two small screw eyes, monofilament [fishing line--I used 20 lb. line], a glue gun, and a piece of card stock or heavy paper, 2" x 8."

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    2 Discussions

    0
    Alex in NZ
    Alex in NZ

    1 year ago

    Interesting idea. Thanks for sharing it :-)

    0
    bufffrancisco
    bufffrancisco

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thanks— it’s one project in a summer upcycling class. The students enjoyed the making and the outcome: wahoo!