Electromagnetic Levitation Device

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Introduction: Electromagnetic Levitation Device

About: Just do things, electronics, woodwork, etc.

Hello, today I'll show you how I made levitron. So the idea of device is very simple, the electromagnet lift into the air a piece of magnetic material, and in order to create the floating effect, it is connected with a high frequency, lifting and dropping the subject.

Step 1: Devise Circuit

Step 2: Assembly

Let's move on to the assembly, first we need to make a frame for the electromagnet around these parameters, 6mm diameter, winding length of about 23mm and a diameter of plugs with a margin somewhere 25mm, as you see I built it from a notebook sheet, cardboard and super glue, naturally previously spilled half a bottle on hand and table. So, now we fix the beginning of the wires in the frame, relaxing and starting to wind about 550 turns, no matter in what direction, and can wind in bulk, I have decided that it is for wimps and made 12 layers turn to turn killing one and a half hours.

Step 3: Soldering

Fix the end of the wire, put off the coil and pass to the soldering, all under the circuit without any nuances. Hall sensor soldered to wires because it will be located inside the coil and in fact we done. We can only set it up, as I said We put sensor inside, fix it, suspended coil and apply power, by bringing the magnet feels that it is attracted or repelled, depending on the pole and at a distance trying to fly, but does not.

Step 4: Tuning

After spending half an hour trying to to find an answer to the eternal question, "well, why this **** does not work!?" I'm desperate and decided to resort to extreme measures - to read the sensor's datasheet, which is specially for the idiots like me, in pictures, showing which side of it has sensitive area. Take it out, bends here in such a way that with inscriptions flat side was eventually parallel to the ground and put back - this time it's much better, but still not floating, what the problem is now I realized surprisingly quickly, tablet form - not the most successful thing to levitate and just enough to shift the center of gravity to the bottom, I made it of a piece of thick paper scribbled with the logo of the project, by the way do not forget to look which side of the magnet is attracted to the coil. Actually, now everything is more or less running and we need only align and secure the sensor. What else are nuances ... at first I wanted to use 12V adapter, but an electromagnet wildly warmed up, had to switch to 5V, I did not notice any worsening of work, and the heat was almost completely cured, the transistor then the way is surprisingly cold, I thought I'll have to use a heat sink, LED and limiting resistor were almost immediately disabled, the meaning of which 0. And as the final touch - a blue paper tape seemed not enough sexy, take it off it, I was right - a copper wire coil turn to turn looks much better.

Step 5: Final

Actually, if I would have done the housing for my handicrafts, levitron first

in the list - definitely, and by the simplicity of the circuit and showiness it can compete with the Tesla coil,

probably even I'll recommend it as the first device. Also I have YouTube channel :)

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Circuits Contest 2016

Runner Up in the
Circuits Contest 2016

2 People Made This Project!

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40 Discussions

0
JohnJ415
JohnJ415

Tip 1 year ago

I found that this scheme is quite unstable and would heavily depend on Hall sensor's (which is a switch here) sensitivity and parameters of the coil and magnet. If switch is too sensitive for particular setup, then it's impossible to calibrate it - when switch is too low (like in this example) then it's not enough of magnetic field from the coil to hold magnet yet, and when magnet is closer to the switch - it triggers and just turns coil off. If put switch higher (inside the coil - the coil itself begins triggering switch, and system fall into oscillation.
I think better design will be with proportional hall sensor and regulated comparator (opamp).

0
rgco
rgco

Reply 9 months ago

Hi, I came to exactly the same conclusion: I can just get it to work, but only for a very small magnet. Basically, my 3144 hall-switch is too sensitive. I say 'my' because the datasheet specifies 70-350Gauss for the operating point, so there may be a very large variation between individual parts. The magnet has to stay far from the sensor, but close to the coil, meaning that the sensor ends up in the center of the coil. But then at high current the coil itself switches off the sensor. Too bad I really like the simple schematic. If there were a way to reduce the sensitivity of the sensor, it could work great, but the only way out I see is indeed the linear hall sensor.

0
Nißßa
Nißßa

1 year ago

Are the 12 layers of wire connected?

0
HiteshH6
HiteshH6

1 year ago on Step 1

If I use other gauge copper wire than it will work

0
HiteshH6
HiteshH6

1 year ago on Step 2

Winding of copper wire should be 550 turn not more than that

0
PravalG
PravalG

Question 1 year ago on Step 2

I am having problems in completing the circuit. I don't know how to connect hall sensor, electromagnet and circuit. Please help me.

1
KamilÇ17
KamilÇ17

1 year ago

Hi,
How the circuit supply feedback and control the amplitude of the magnetic field? How does the circuit keep the distance between the magnet and the coil?
Thanks

0
manasv
manasv

Question 2 years ago on Step 5

Which type of calculations part can we do for this pro....plz can you give me a suggestion....!plz as fast as u can...

0
MrJTP27
MrJTP27

2 years ago

I was wanting to try to make this but I had a few questions before I started.

My main question is what is the Maximum weight that this can hold?

And, is it possible to build this without building my own electromagnet?

0
GIANNISL2
GIANNISL2

3 years ago

AND YOU ARE NOT AN IDIOT....EVERYONE MAKES MISTAKES...THE DATASHEET ARE NOT FOR IDIOTS...ELECTRONIC DATASHEETS ARE ....''CHINESE'' FOR 99.9 OF THE PEOPLE..EVEN SOME ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS DONT KNOW HOW TO READ THEM PROPERLY...IF YOUR LEVITRON WORKS ITS BY FAR THE SIMPLEST AND MOST AWESOME OF ALL...!!!

0
GIANNISL2
GIANNISL2

3 years ago

OK...I JUST REALISED THAT ALL THESE SENSORS ....A3144...BLA BLA...ARE SWITCHES...THERE IS AN IC WITH THE SENSOR INSIDE..BUT AGAIN CAN YOU EXPLAIN HOW IT WORKS WITH THE HELP FROM THE MOSFET...?AND IF I USE A STRONGER ELECTROMAGNET WITH THE SAME MOSFET AND HALL SWITCH...CAN WE LEVITATE A LITTLE MORE WEIGHT??THNX IN ADVANCE ..HOPE FOR A QUICK RESPONSE

0
Laral
Laral

4 years ago

I came here expecting to see a homemade Levitron-like passive levitator, with permanent magnets, but as others have pointed out, this is not that, and has nothing to do with it. So why the copyrighted name? This is a very simple active electromagnetic levitator, which is fine, just not a Levitron. There are a couple of Instructables on how to make a true Levitron-like device but not very good ones. There are better examples on YouTube. I have made one that doesn't require any weights at all.

0
GIANNISL2
GIANNISL2

Reply 3 years ago

IF YOU THINK THAT THE PASSIVE LEVITATOR IS MORE COMPLICATED THAN THIS GO BACK TO HIGH SCHOOL...THESE EXAMPLES YOU HAVE IN YOU TUBE CAN BE MADE BY 3 YEAR OLDS!!!!THERE IS ONLY ONE WAY TO MAKE A A LEVITATING DEVICE WITHOUT SOME IDIOTIC SPINING OR SOME BARRIER AT THE END TO CONTROL THE MAGNET MOVING..!!IF THIS INSTRUCTABLE WORKS IT IS ABSOLUTELY PERFECT...!THE ONLY THING IS THAT I SEE NOTHING TO READ THE SENSOR AND CONTROL THE POWER IN THE ELECTROMAGNET...AND I DONT SEE SOMETHING LIKE IRS THAT OTHERS USE TO ALSO CONTROL THE DISTANCE MAGNET ELECTROMAGNET...!!CHEERS!!

0
PeterB920
PeterB920

3 years ago

Very nice project indeed, but I have a couple questions.

First of all, you wrote that the led is optional, does that mean that this circuit is going to be completely fine without it?

And secondly, if I make a bigger coil with more wire, can it make a stronger magnet at the same voltage, thus increasing the gap between the coil and the permanent magnet? And also, if I used a bigger/stronger magnet, could I increase the gap as well?

Thanks, looking forward to building this!

0
mmccracken
mmccracken

3 years ago

Hi, Constantin,

This is a very nice project! Thanks for putting together this Instructable. I had an undergraduate student build it, and it worked very well. We were both quite excited. We made four component substitutions:

1) for the diode, we used a 1N4007

2) for the MOSFET, we used a IRFZ44NPBF

3) for the Hall Effect sensor, we used a A1104LUA-T

4) rather than a dc charger, we used a very stable DC power supply

Check out https://www.instagram.com/m_mccrackles/

Thanks again!

-m

0
osterac
osterac

3 years ago

I tried to build this but had trouble. I couldn't find the same hall effect sensor so I bought a couple of them but couldn't get either to work. The circuit diagram was a bit confusing to me. I wasn't sure about which way positive and negative were supposed to go, and I really had no idea which way the hall effect sensor was meant to be hooked up by looking at the diagram. The mosfet part of the diagram confused me as well. You have 2 leads hooked up to pins 1 and 3 with what looks like 2 of the pins shorted together, then another lead connected to... The heatsink? The heatsink is connected to one of the pins (2 I think). So the way I'm looking at the diagram, 2 of the leads of the hall effect sensor would be shorted together and connected to 2 of the pins of the mosfet as well as a resistor and either positive or negative power. Can you clarify?

Also, I used .3mm magnet wire and it took more windings than I could count. I'd estimate about 300 feet of magnet wire.

Thanks

Allen

0
wernert
wernert

3 years ago

Very cool project. :)

I am wondering if it would be possible to eliminate the need for the Hall effect sensor if you simply control the on/off times of the coil very precisely. From my quick calculations, when you switch off the coil magnet for about 15 uS, then the small magnet would fall about 1 mm. If you then switch on the coil to attract it back about 1mm exactly then it should also stay in this permanent state of falling and being attracted.

The cool thing about doing it with just time control would be that you can possibly increase the distance between the two magnets to absolute maximum and especially if you have a really strong electromagnet. Or what do you think?