Macrame Bird Perch

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Introduction: Macrame Bird Perch

About: Hi! I'm Jeromina Juan. Formerly paperplateandplane. Contest addict, earning my beloved kitchen and tech supplies one contest at a time.

This beautifully boho 3-level macrame bird perch provides endless hours of play and rest for your pet birds. The top and bottom rings are perches, while the center ring is a swing. All of the design elements thoughtfully offer plenty of enrichment for your feathered friends. Not only can your birds perch, climb, and swing on 100% natural jute rope, they can also safely peck raw wood beads, make noise with bells, preen tassels, and forage through macrame "feathers" where you can slip in seeds into the knots.

I have always admired macrame projects, but haven't had much purpose to make one until now. As this is my first venture into macrame, this project incorporates the easiest beginner macrame knots. You will find it quite simple to make, and it adds functional feathered flair to your decor.

Make sure to use only natural jute/hemp or sisal for safety and, as with all rope toys, monitor your birds while at play.

Supplies

100% natural/undyed 7 mm jute rope -- I used about 65 feet

Jute twine -- several inches

Screw hook with anchor -- for fastening to the ceiling

2-1/2" wooden ring

Raw/unfinished wood beads

Liberty bells (jingle bells are not suggested for birds)

3 x 10" rings

Step 1: Introducing Duckie and Bluebell*

Before we begin, here are cute pictures of our parakeets, Duckie and Bluebell*, loving their new perch.

We adopted Duckie and Bluebell last month as they were rehomed for the second time. They are flighted birds and we give them as much time as possible to be out of their cage and feel included in the family. It was quickly obvious that their favorite spot in our house was the pendant light above our kitchen island -- not quite the ideal place for birds to be perching themselves! So I decided to make them their own personal place to hang out, inspired by the design and shape of lantern pendant chandeliers.

It is so satisfying to see just how much they appreciate their new perch.

*Our 8 year old renamed them after two birds of Youtuber's ElleAndTheBirds, and she insists those are the only names they can have.

Step 2: Cut Strands

You will need 4 strands of 7 mm natural jute rope cut into lengths of 10 ft each.

Step 3: Lark's Head Knots

To start the project, you will need to connect the 4 strands of jute rope to the wood ring.

1. Fold the rope in half. On one end, you will have the "folded end" and on the other end, you will have the "tails". Put the folded end through the wood ring; just a couple of inches of the folded end through the ring will be sufficient.

2. Take the tails through the wood ring and under the folded end.

3. Pull the tails until the knot is tight.

4. Add the second strand and repeat steps 1-3.

5. Repeat with the third and fourth strands.

Step 4: Square Knots

1. The first picture shows what the finished square knots will look like.

2. Distinctly separate into 4 double strands (each double strand will have 2 tails).

3. Starting with the leftmost double strand, fold to make the shape of a number 4 (I will call this the "left loop"). Place over the second and third double strands, then under the fourth double strand.

4. Now take the rightmost double strand and fold it to make the shape of a reversed number 4 (I will call this the "right loop"). Place this double strand under the second and third double strands.

5. Still working with the same double strand, place it under the left loop, then pull it over to make a shape similar to a pretzel, as shown.

6. Now as you pull the tails, hold the two center double strands in place. Tightly pull the tails until snug.

7. The seventh picture shows the tight knot and there should be no gaps.

8. Now working in reverse, start with the rightmost double strand, and fold the strand to make a right loop. Place over the two center double strands and under the first.

9. Take the leftmost double strand and fold it to make a left loop. Place under the two center strands.

10. Still working with the same double strand, place it under the right loop, then pull it over to make another pretzel-like shape.

11. Tightly pull the tails snug, while holding the two center double strands in place.

Continue repeating the above steps (alternating starting from the leftmost then the rightmost) until you reach the length you desire.


Step 5: Attach Top Horizontal Ring

Once you've achieved your desired length of square knots, it's time to secure the double strands to the first (top) horizontal ring.

1. Place the double strands over the ring, distinctly spacing them to divide the circle into 4 equal quarters.

2. For each quarter, take the double strand and place under the ring.

3. Divide the double strand into its 2 tails. Pull the tails through the center.

4. Take the right tail and bring towards the back. A loop will be formed in the back. Pull the tail through the loop.

5. Just like in the previous step, take the left tail and bring towards the back. Pull the tail through the loop.

6. Before securing and tightening, make sure the length between the square knots and the ring are as desired.

7. Repeat with the other 3 double strands.


Step 6: Alternating Half Hitch Knots

1. For the length between the top and bottom rings, I made two facing double strands with alternating half hitch knots, shown in the first picture.

2. To make the first half hitch knot, take the left tail and place over the right tail, forming the shape of a number 4.

3. Pull through under the right tail and over the left, creating a pretzel shape as shown.

4. Now onto the right side, take the right tail and place over the left, forming the shape of a reverse number 4.

5. Pull through under the left tail and over the right, creating a pretzel shape as shown.

6. The sixth picture show two alternating hitch knots.

7. Continue repeating the above steps to make alternating hitch knots.

8. Repeat until your desired length is achieved.

Step 7: Attach Vertical Ring -- Swing

1. With the remaining 2 facing double strands, I took one tail from each to secure the middle ring, which is in a vertical swing position.

2. Gather one tail from each of the 2 remaining double strands and place over the vertical ring.

3. Take the two tails through the center.

4. Take the right tail and bring towards the back. A loop will be formed in the back. Pull the tail through the loop. Take the left tail and bring towards the back. Pull the tail through the loop.

5. Pull the tails and tighten. You now have 1 single strand on each of 2 facing sides, and 1 length of alternating hitch knots on the other 2 facing sides.

Step 8: Attach Bottom Horizontal Ring

Now you will have 4 sides to secure to the bottom horizontal ring, 2 sides are alternating half hitch knots and the other 2 sides are single strands.

1. Starting with a side that has the alternating half hitch knots, take the tails and place under the ring.

2. Pull the tails through the center.

3. Tighten as you pull, until snug and secure. Repeat for the other side that has the alternating half hitch knots.

4. No onto the sides with single strands. Take the strand and tie using a basic knot onto the ring.

5. Pull and tighten. Then repeat with the last remaining side.


Step 9: Macrame Feathers

My birds can spend hours on these macrame feathers. They climb, hang upside down, and forage. The macrame feathers are definitely their favorite part of this perch.

1. There are several ways to make macrame feathers, however the ways I've seen online provide a bulky center, especially for 7 mm jute rope. So I simplified the feathers into basic knots. The completed feathers are shown in the first picture.

2. To prepare the feathers, cut several lengths of jute rope -- I cut 15 strands of 9" lengths for each feather.

3. Starting right at the intersection where the alternating half hitch knots and bottom horizontal ring meet, I secured one strand using a basic knot.

4. Tighten the knot and make sure it is as close as possible to the ring.

5. Add the second knot using the same steps, ensuring the knot is as close as possible to the previous.

6. Continue securing the strands with basic knots, one after the other, always ensuring they are tightly touching.

7. Pull apart and unravel each end of the strands.

8. Fluff up the unraveled strands.

9. Using very sharp scissors, trim the strands to create a feather shape.

Step 10: Beads, Bells, & Tassels

Time to add some more frills.

1. I decided to add beads, a bell, and tassel to each of the remaining 2 single strands. The completed strand is shown in the first picture.

2. Add the beads one at a time.

3. Secure each bead with a basic knot underneath.

4. Repeat with as many beads as desired.

5. Pull apart and unravel the ends.

6. You now have a tassel.

7. Using jute twine, tie a bell to the top of the tassel.

8. I also chose to add beads, bells, and tassels to the strands that hold up the vertical swing.

Step 11: Fun for Feathered Friends

There you have it -- a lovingly made macrame perch for your birdie babies. Enjoy watching them enjoy their new favorite hangout spot.

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    17 Comments

    0
    Peregrine9
    Peregrine9

    5 days ago on Step 1

    THE BIRDS ARE.... KISSING thats so cute!

    0
    Jeromina
    Jeromina

    Reply 21 minutes ago

    <3

    0
    mariatags
    mariatags

    4 days ago

    I love this! And I love that you rescued Duckie and Bluebell, way to go! I will make this for my "kids" :)

    0
    Jeromina
    Jeromina

    Reply 21 minutes ago

    Thanks! I'd love to see what you make. Your birdie babies will love it.

    0
    AsioFlammeus
    AsioFlammeus

    7 days ago

    This is such a cool project! Great job on the instructions, I've never done macrame before either and I usually have a really hard time following knot-tying instructions but you did an amazing job photographing everything so it's easy to follow. Love that it looks really decorative too.

    0
    Jeromina
    Jeromina

    Reply 7 days ago

    Thank you!

    0
    niky4
    niky4

    8 days ago

    amazing! I'm a bit worried about the birds ingesting the rope, though. so, definitely keep an eye on them -- make sure they're not eating it LOL
    I should make something similar. my flock sure would love to turn all that rope into nesting material (I have lovies, and they are completely obsessed with filling the world with lovebirds)

    0
    Algiz
    Algiz

    Reply 7 days ago

    I have a room full of parrots...they shred and chew and nibble, never seen them ingest it. They chew and shred in the wild, they don't eat it...it's very rare that a pet parrot swallows a toy or toy stuff

    0
    niky4
    niky4

    Reply 7 days ago

    look up pictures of impacted crops.

    I had a BABY die of it because his dad fed him a fibrous plant.

    birds ingesting fibrous stuff is no joke -- it may not happen to most birds, but if it does, it can have very serious (up to life-threatening) consequences.

    so if you let them chew on fibrous stuff a) make sure it's natural and not synthetic, and b) make sure they're not eating it, just shredding it.

    also, it won't hurt to do regular "crop checkups" i.e. leave them with no food overnight and make sure their crop is entirely empty in the morning.

    0
    Algiz
    Algiz

    Reply 7 days ago

    yes it does happen. It also happens in the wild. You have to give birds something to do or might as well not have any birds.

    0
    niky4
    niky4

    Reply 7 days ago

    yes. wood.
    wood is far harder to swallow than fibers. and far more common in nature.

    0
    Jeromina
    Jeromina

    Reply 8 days ago

    Yes, we definitely have to monitor rope toys! My birbs have done a little shredding, but luckily they don't like to eat rope and let the fibers fall to the liner on the floor.

    Oooh, rope nests must be fun to make! The world needs more lovies.

    0
    niky4
    niky4

    Reply 8 days ago

    noooo you can't let them breed all they want! so my job is to discourage them LOL
    they just like to shred everything into strips to make a nest. so I have to be careful in not letting them access too many shreddable things. but it's hard since they will shred literally anything -- from cardboard and wood, to cloth and even hard plastics.

    0
    Algiz
    Algiz

    7 days ago

    very cool....I have a room full of adopted parrots and I am still looking to make a ceiling-mounted play gym...this gives me ideas, but it has to be for larger parrots (Macaw, Cockatoo, African Grey)...thank you !

    0
    Jeromina
    Jeromina

    Reply 7 days ago

    Glad you are inspired! Thank you!

    0
    jessyratfink
    jessyratfink

    10 days ago

    That is gorgeous!! And I love seeing your birds hanging out on it :D

    0
    Jeromina
    Jeromina

    Reply 10 days ago

    Thank you!