Make Your Own Headphone Amp V1

Introduction: Make Your Own Headphone Amp V1

About: I've always liked pulling things apart - it's the putting back together again that I have some issues with!

I never really thought much about headphone amps until I tried one. I used to think it was all a bit of a gimmick. Why would you need a separate amp to drive the speakers in your headphones! It’s only when you try a headphone amp that you realise the benefits and sound quality improvement possible from a separate amp. The only problem is, you’ll never be able to listen to music again without one!

You can buy an off-the-shelf one if you want to but I’m going to assume you’re reading this because you’d rather build your own. The build itself isn’t too difficult, although you will need some soldering and circuit experience to make this. If you have never done any circuit building, then you should start with this ‘ible which I did some time ago to help beginners.

The heart of the amp is 2 X LM386 IC’s. Unlike some headphone amps, you can run this one on a 9v battery but because of this, you need to be careful how you hook-up the ground connections. I’ll take you through this in the following steps.

Lastly, I’ll be building a few more of these and comparing different models in future ‘ibles.

Step 1: Parts

Parts:

1. 2 X LM386 IC – eBay

Resistors. Use the metal film type, which are superior to the carbon ones, at least for this project

2. 10 Ohm – eBay

3. 18K – eBay

Capacitors. Make sure you use good, audio ones for the best possible sound. The electrolytic ones should be low leakage; low impedance type and the ceramic should be metal film, polypropylene. I have added links to eBay for these types of caps

4. 4 X 10uf – eBay

5. 3 X 470 uf eBay

6. 3 X 0.1uf - eBay

7. 100k duel gang potentiometer – eBay

8. 2 X 3.5mm stereo jack sockets – eBay

9. 9v Battery

10. 9V Battery holder – eBay

11. DPST toggle switch – eBay

12. Knob – eBay

13. Male to male audio cable 3.5mm - eBay

You can also add a charging socket which will require a 330 Ohm resistor as well as a socket. I’ll probably add this later so left it in the circuit diagram.

14. Case. I found a great case at Jaycar (electronics shop in Aust) which has its own battery compartment. It’s a little on the larger size but makes the job of fitting everything inside a pretty easy one. You can get them on eBay too

Step 2: Separating Input and Output Grounds

Before you start to build this amp, you should read the below which goes through how to hook-up the ground connections. The important thing to remember is to separate the input and output grounds. If you don’t then you will get oscillations which will be auditable through the headphones.

So what does it mean to keep the input and output grounds separated? Basically it means to connect all of the input grounds in the circuit together and all of the output grounds together. They are then connected together by a single connection.

The following at all input grounds so will need to be connected together on the prototype board. Ground input from the socket, volume control ground pin, pins 2 and 4 of both IC's. All others are output grounds.

All I did to separate the grounds was to add the input connections along one of the vertical bus strips and the output next to them on the other vertical bus strip. This way you can connect the bus strips together at one point.

Step 3: Making the Circuit Pins 1, 2 & 4

I’ll go through how you make one channel of the circuit. The other is built exactly the same.

Steps:

1. First, solder an IC socket header for the LM386 IC to the prototype board

2. Connect pins 2 and 4 to the input ground

3. Add a 18K resistor to pin 1 and connect the other leg to a spare spot on the prototype board close to pin 5.

Step 4: Making the Circuit - Pins 5

Steps:

1. Add the positive leg on the 470uf capacitor to pin 5 on the IC

2. Next, you need to add a 10uf capacitor to the leg of the 18K resistor and the other leg of the 470uf cap. Actually, there are a few parts that need to be added to the ground leg of this cap so make sure you plan this out first before you start to solder everything to the prototype board.

3. Attach the .01 cap to the same ground leg on the 470uf cap and the other leg to an empty spot.

4. Lastly, add a 10 ohm resistor to the .01 cap and solder the other leg to the output strip bus ground

Step 5: Making the Circuit - Pins 6 & 7 and the Next Channel

Steps:

1. Pin 6 needs to be connect to positive bus strip

2. Connect the positive end of the 10uf cap to pin 7

3. Connect the ground leg on the 10uf cap to the output ground

4. That’s the main components in the first channel. You now need to build a duplicate exactly the same. One channel is for the left hand side speaker and the other for the right hand side. The 2 circuits will be connected via headphone sockets, wires and potentiometer

Step 6: Making the Circuit - Battery Caps and Wires

Next thing to do is to add all of the wires that are needed to attach the circuit to the other components.

Steps:

1. You need to connect a couple of capacitors from positive to ground on the circuit board. This helps reduce noise. Solder a 470uf cap and a .01 cap from positive to ground

Wiring

Volume potentiometer and input socket

1. Solder a wire to input ground which will be attached to the right solder point on the pot,

2. A wire on each of pin 3 on the IC which will be connected to the middle solder point on the pot

3. Solder a couple of wires onto the input socket which should be connected to the tip and ring solder points on the socket

4. Solder a wire to the ground solder point on the input socket and then connected to the input ground bus on the circuit board

Output Socket

1. Solder a couple of wires to the negative leg on the 470uf cap. These will be connected to the tip and ring solder points on the output socket

2. Solder a wire to the ground solder point on the input socket and then connected to the output ground bus on the circuit board

Battery

1. Solder a wire to ground and another to positive for the battery holder. One of these will be connected to the switch later on

Step 7: Wiring the Connections

Once you have added all of the wires to the circuit it's now time to connect them to the rest of the other bits.

Steps:

1. First add the pot, switch and the 2 sockets to the case. I added all of these parts to the front section of my case

2. Place the circuit into the case and start to solder the connections together. You want to be able to place the top of the case flat and then attach all of the wires. This will let you be able to open the case easily if necessary.

3. Carefully solder the wires to all of the correct connections. Take your time and refer to the schematic to make sure you do them correctly.

4. Once everything is connected, add a battery and check to make sure the amp works as it should. If it doesn't, check your connections and also the solder points on the circuit board so there's no short circuits.

5. If the amp works as it should, close up the case and get ready to be rocked by awesome sound.

NOTE: You may have noticed that here is an extra circuit inside the case. This was a voltage regulator that I was going to add until I noticed that it was causing some interference so I took it out. There isn't really any need for it, I just thought it might help add a filter to the power.

Step 8: Using You Headphone Amp

Steps:

1. Now you have everything inside the case, it’s time to finally add the battery, turn it on and listen to the best sounding music your ears have heard!

2. Also, remember to make sure you don’t have the volume turned up fully on the amp and also your phone when you turn it on – you could damage your ears as it really pumps out the noise.

NOTE:

You may experience some “ticking” sounds sometimes when you have the volume down. This is caused by interference from usually a phone. The best thing to do if you experience this is to turn your phone onto aeroplane mode, which should stop any interference.

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    34 Discussions

    0
    Tony Pike
    Tony Pike

    Question 4 weeks ago on Introduction

    Hi lonesoulsurfer. I'm new to all this electronic wizardry but really fancy having a crack at this headphone amp. Looking at caps there are options for different voltages. What voltage are the ones you use mate?

    0
    lonesoulsurfer
    lonesoulsurfer

    Answer 4 weeks ago

    Hey there,
    As it's only 9v you really don't have to worry about the voltage rating on the caps. They are all pretty much 16V plus so any will work.
    This is the first one that I built as well. However, I've done a few more since this one which you might also want to check out. I use a different schematic and design for the others which I think is better than this one. However, saying that, this headphone amp is still very good.

    0
    Tony Pike
    Tony Pike

    Reply 4 weeks ago

    Hey lonesoulsurfer.

    Thanks for getting back to me so quickly. Thanks for the info mate. I found a fantastic website yesterday called "Learning about electronics" and did some reading about capacitors. Then started on Transistors last night. Flippin' 'eck! What a massive subject they are. You mentioned links to ebay for the caps but I can't see any anywhere. I've visited your youtube channel too. Prices seem to vary wildly with the polypropylene being the most expensive. What did you use?

    Keep well matey.

    Cheers Tony.

    0
    lonesoulsurfer
    lonesoulsurfer

    Reply 25 days ago

    Yeah she's a deep rabbit hole alright!
    For non-polarized caps I always try to use either polyester or polypropylene. The ceramic will also work but for audio I'd use one of the other 2. If you are using electrolytic (polarized) caps, then I use the low ESR ones which are also good for audio.
    I've also added links to each of the parts. If you head over to Jaycar you will be able to pick-up all of the parts as well. Good luck with the build

    0
    drumbum99
    drumbum99

    7 months ago

    Thanks for putting this together.
    I've tried building it but with no success.
    You mention keeping the grounds separate but also joining them... Are they meant to stay separate or do I join them together?
    Does it matter what type of lm386 you use? I found a few of different wattages and am not sure if that is why I'm having no joy?

    0
    drumbum99
    drumbum99

    Reply 7 months ago

    I connected them and it works a treat

    0
    dogansese
    dogansese

    8 months ago

    Hi, i made 3 piece of this circuit by soldering abd many times on breadboard. But i have super noises sometimes has no sound from headphone :(
    I m not a dumb on electronics. I made midi controllers. But i dont know why i couldunt succes this circuit :(

    0
    dogansese
    dogansese

    Reply 8 months ago

    I see. I use 9v adaptor to power it. I add 470uf and 0.1 nf capasitors between pozitif and input ground. But didnt add 330 ohm redistor. Is ıt caused by 9 volt adaptor instead of 12 volt?

    0
    mperconti
    mperconti

    1 year ago

    Hi! Thank you very much for the instructable! I'm trying to build it and made all the steps, but in the 6th step the .01 capacitor in your photos looks smaller than the other ones. Would you mind writing the full specifications of each capacitor? Thank you very much.

    0
    lonesoulsurfer
    lonesoulsurfer

    Reply 1 year ago

    The .01 caps that I used are polyester caps (the yellow ones in the image in step 6). I used polyester as they are preferable for audio builds like this. You can use other types of caps like ceramic ones but you might not get as nice a sound out of them.

    0
    mperconti
    mperconti

    Reply 1 year ago

    I used polyester caps too. I finished the prototype but I only get sound on the right side. All the components are ok and also the soldering. Any idea why could this happen? Thanks.

    0
    lonesoulsurfer
    lonesoulsurfer

    Reply 1 year ago

    it's hard to diagnose the problem without seeing the circuit etc. The only thing I can suggest is to go over each of the connections again and see if you can identify if anything is wrong. You could also breadboard it and see if you get the same issue. Good luck and let me know how you go

    0
    mperconti
    mperconti

    Reply 1 year ago

    Hi! I checked all the connections and everything seemed ok. Checking the circuit I wasn't very sure about the 0.1uf in each channel so I removed them and it worked whitout any problem! Once it worked I added a green led with a 1k resistor, and later removed the 470uf cap who goes from positive to ground because was causing an annoying noise when turning off the amp. Anyway, now it's working perfect. Thank you very much for posting the instructable and for your feedback. I'll post a picture with the case when I finish.

    0
    mperconti
    mperconti

    Reply 1 year ago

    Here it is finished with a custom wood case. Works perfect!

    P_20190922_213134.jpg
    0
    lonesoulsurfer
    lonesoulsurfer

    Reply 1 year ago

    Awesome! How’s the sound?

    0
    mperconti
    mperconti

    Reply 1 year ago

    Awesome! Very clean. Just a little bit of harsh when the pot is at the middle of the volume. But just when it's in the exact middle and it's not annoying, probably because of the quality of the pot. Now I'm trying to build a two channel amp.

    0
    marvelmx
    marvelmx

    1 year ago

    I was thinking on how to amplify the volume of my headphones via software but nothing worked much, and then like magic came the newsletter of Instructables with this. MAGIC!

    Thank you, OP. It's been years since I played with a protoboard but I may give it a try, although I think a good alternative would be to give it a USB or v8 hub adapter for cable power supply so you can connect it to a portable battery or to the PC and maybe adding an extra capacitor just in case.

    0
    lonesoulsurfer
    lonesoulsurfer

    Reply 1 year ago

    Love a bit of Magic! Good idea re. adding the ability for an external power supply. You could also add a re-chargeable 9v battery and add a socket so you can charge it it via a 12v wall plug.

    0
    BobF16
    BobF16

    1 year ago

    Can you please provide the JAYCAR Cat. No. for the case?