Making Thin Wood Boards for Laser Cutting

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Introduction: Making Thin Wood Boards for Laser Cutting

About: If its practical, I have no use for it!

Thin plywood sheets are a favorite material for laser cutting. They are sturdy, dimensionally stable, and easily available in different thicknesses. But with thin plywood boards you are mostly limited to birch - no nice cherry, walnut, oak, maple, etc. And the laser-cut edges never look good even when you sand off the burned part.

So I prepare my own thin wood boards for laser cutting; and I’ll show you how to cut (resaw) them safely on a table saw to 1/4”, 1/8”, or even less thickness. I have made hardwood boards from maple, cherry, and walnut as thin as 1/16". Its not plywood; but if you laminate two or more layers after laser cutting you will have a strong final piece.

Of course you could take a hardwood board and plane it down to your desired thickness; but I think that’s a lot of waste. By resawing a 3/4" thick board I can get at least three thin boards for my projects.

Supplies

3/4 inch or thicker hardwood board

Equipment:

Table Saw, Sander, Planer (optional)

Step 1: Straighten the Edges

Let's take a 5 inch wide hardwood board 3/4 inch thick, and let’s make it 12 to 20 inches long, whatever fits into your laser cutter. Make sure the board is not warped, cupped, or twisted. The surfaces should be planed and sanded smooth. Cut off any checks or splits on the ends of the board. Make a rip cut along the two long edges to have them clean and straight. If you have a jointer planer, use it.

Step 2: First Cut

For these cuts I use a thin kerf ripping blade with good results. Raise the table saw blade to slightly more than half the width of the board. Make sure the blade is perpendicular to the table saw top. Set the fence to 1/8” from the blade. Stand the board on edge and make the cut as shown. It is essential to use a feather-board to hold the work piece against the fence ahead of the blade. Be sure to use the table saw riving knife. I use a second feather-board past the blade for better control, but I mount it with very little pressure against the wood to avoid pinching the blade. Never use a feather-board against the blade!

Go slow when making the cut as the table saw will be working really hard.

If you want to cut a board thinner than 1/8” I highly recommend to use a waste board clamped against the fence.

By the way, I made my own 3d printed feather-board in this Instructable.

Step 3: Second Cut

The second cut is made by flipping the board end-over-end, putting the same side against the fence as in the first cut. This cut will separate the board, so be very careful near the end of the cut. Use a push stick like the one shown, it can be easily made from a scrap piece of 2 by 4 lumber. The push stick is 9 inches long, the heel is 1/2 inch deep.

Step 4: Third and Fourth Cut

Put the first 1/8" thick board aside. With the remaining board repeat the two cuts, putting the remaining good surface against the fence.

You will have two boards 1/8” thick and the center board of some thickness.

Step 5: Finish the Surfaces

None of the four sawed faces will be perfect; plane and/or sand them to remove any tool marks. From the 3/4 inch thick original board I got two 1/8 inch thick boards and one 3/16 inch thick board ready for the laser cutter.

Step 6: How to Cut Wider Boards

Most 10” table saw blades will rise to about 3.5 inches. At that height the cuts can be a little dicey. If you need to resaw a board wider than 6 inches make two cuts of 3 inches (blade height) as before, then cut down through the middle on a bandsaw or with a handsaw. It works pretty well. Finish the surfaces as before.

Step 7: Using the Hardwood Boards

When you have your thin hardwood board you can laser-cut your design. I use blue painter’s tape both top and bottom to keep the surfaces clean from smoke stains and pitch deposits. After cutting, peel off the tape, do a light sanding, and you are good. If necessary laminate pieces together for additional strength, crossing the grain direction if possible.

Since you are using solid hardwood you can sand the burned laser-cut edges to bring back your beautiful hardwood. A few examples are included.

I made some toys with cherry wood, two and four layers laminated for strength. Look at the pictures and check out my Instructable “Toy Workbench With Lots of Wooden Tools”.

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    7 Comments

    0
    jeanniel1
    jeanniel1

    1 year ago

    This is great as I want to make jigsaw puzzle pieces with solid wood - or laminated solid wood, and don't want to depend on the thin ply from the lumber yards. Most seem to have inner cores that burn more than get cut by the laser. I read that Liberty Jigsaw Company has special hardwood plys made for them so they can have solid pieces.

    0
    oooooh
    oooooh

    Tip 1 year ago on Step 7

    If anyone wants to laminate larger pieces it's best to use unequal laminations i.e. 3 layers, 5 or 7 layers etc. This always allows the board to bow but unlikely to warp, and thus remains flat when fixed. You may have notice old ply boards that have been wet and delaminated where the laminations are are split equally they fight each other both winning and losing in different areas causing warps in all directions. Suppose it doesn't matter for small items but I would not put a lot of work into a larger project without following this rule.
    P.S. Great instructable!

    0
    rschoenm
    rschoenm

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thanks! Good tip on laminating.

    0
    Sewphia_Makes
    Sewphia_Makes

    1 year ago

    Oh you can sand it! I'm new to lasercutting and i saw the beautiful unburnt edges with surprise. Useful tip!

    0
    rschoenm
    rschoenm

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thanks!

    0
    the_tool_man
    the_tool_man

    Tip 1 year ago

    Great instructable! I've been using a tablesaw to rip veneers for years. And this is exactly the technique I've used. I would advise against using a feather board after the blade. Unless the riving knife is almost exactly as wide as the saw kerf, there is a risk that the pressure from the feather board will pinch the workpiece against the blade and cause a kickback. Besides, I've never found a downstream feather board necessary. Aside from that one safety concern, this is a great way to make thin boards for projects. Thanks!

    0
    rschoenm
    rschoenm

    Reply 1 year ago

    Thanks for your comment. You raise a valid concern. Maybe I should clarify that (1) I use a very light touch on the downstream featherboard, and (2) I mostly use a thin kerf blade that is easier on my table saw motor and matches the riving knife. I made an edit to my Instructable to address your concern.