Mechanized Cheese Fedora

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Introduction: Mechanized Cheese Fedora

About: Visit myminifactory: https://www.myminifactory.com/users/andrewgoldberg

The fedora has been at the peak of fashion since the 1890's, but unfortunately its popularity since 2004 (and since the 1920's) has been dwindling. The fedora appears to be at a crossroads: adapt or die, and so I've created the mechanized cheese fedora hat. As the ultimate intersection between style and technology and natural evolution of cheese, fedoras, and fashion I expect billions of users by 2030.

This project is a 3D printed cheese slice mounted on a fedora. Inside is a battery, servo motor, and ESP32. The servo motor is controlled based on a webserver hosted on the ESP32. It allows the user to lift up and move down the mouse on top.

Supplies

- 3D printer with greater than 165 x 180 x 80 mm dimesions.

- White filament

- Paints: light yellow, grey, dark grey, black, pink, tan

- SG90 servo motor

- ESP32

- 3 10 cm. male to female wires

- USB battery pack or equivalent

- Small USB micro B cable (to power the ESP) It's a tight fit! A right angle cable may help.

- Tape

- Double sided tape (preferably clear)

- Elmer's glue

- Scissors

- Velcro with sticky side(can be substituted with double sided tape)

- Fedora (or a less fashionable hat)

Step 1: Printing

I've printed each piece in white filament because it's the easiest to paint over. Only the "Cheesehat lift arm" won't be visible.

I designed the lift arm and platform entirely in Fusion360. The cheese was created in Fusion360, then the holes were created in blender using booleans. The mouse was created using the sculpting tools in blender.

The platform and lift arm can be printed without supports, the other two files need supports. For all the files I used .2 mm layer height with a .35 mm nozzle, 60 C bed temperature, 200 C extruder temperature, and 6% infill. The parts were sliced in simplify 3D and printed on a MakerGear M3-SE.

Step 2: Painting

Feel free to get as creative as you'd like with color, but I prefer to avoid green cheese!

I painted the cheese and the top of the platform with a light yellow.

The mouse's fur is grey, its ears and nose are pink, its eyes are blue, its mouth is black, its eyebrows are dark grey, and its tail is tan.

Step 3: Code

/*
  Created by Andrew Goldberg

  A webserver which produces a page where a servo motor is turned ninetry degrees up or down based on the button pressed on the webpage.
 http://yourAddress/H turns the motor up
 http://yourAddress/L turns it down

 This example is written for a network using WPA encryption. For
 WEP or WPA, change the Wifi.begin() call accordingly.

 Circuit:
 Servo motor
 control to D15
 power to 3v3
 ground to GND

 Parts of the code are based on the example called SimpleWiFiServer included with the ESP32.
 I've left the authors names here.
 
 created for arduino 25 Nov 2012
 by Tom Igoe

ported for sparkfun esp32 
31.01.2017 by Jan Hendrik Berlin
 
 */

#include <WiFi.h>
#include <ESP32Servo.h>




Servo myservo;  // create servo object to control a servo
int pos = 0;    // variable to store the servo position
int servoPin = 15;  //Corresponds to D15


const char* ssid     = "";      //place your ssid between the ""
const char* password = "";         //place your password between the ""

WiFiServer server(80);

void setup()
{
    Serial.begin(115200);

    delay(10);

    // We start by connecting to a WiFi network

    Serial.println();
    Serial.println();
    Serial.print("Connecting to ");
    Serial.println(ssid);

    WiFi.begin(ssid, password);

    while (WiFi.status() != WL_CONNECTED) {
        delay(500);
        Serial.print(".");
    }

    Serial.println("");
    Serial.println("WiFi connected.");
    Serial.println("IP address: ");
    Serial.println(WiFi.localIP());
    
    server.begin();


    //Servo stuff
    myservo.setPeriodHertz(50);    // standard 50 hz servo
    myservo.attach(servoPin,500,2500); // attaches the servo on pin 15 to the servo object

}


void loop(){
 WiFiClient client = server.available();   // listen for incoming clients

  if (client) {                             // if you get a client,
    Serial.println("New Client.");           // print a message out the serial port
    String currentLine = "";                // make a String to hold incoming data from the client
    while (client.connected()) {            // loop while the client's connected
      if (client.available()) {             // if there's bytes to read from the client,
        char c = client.read();             // read a byte, then
        Serial.write(c);                    // print it out the serial monitor
        if (c == '\n') {                    // if the byte is a newline character

          // if the current line is blank, you got two newline characters in a row.
          // that's the end of the client HTTP request, so send a response:
          if (currentLine.length() == 0) {
            // HTTP headers always start with a response code (e.g. HTTP/1.1 200 OK)
            // and a content-type so the client knows what's coming, then a blank line:
            client.println("HTTP/1.1 200 OK");
            client.println("Content-type:text/html");
            client.println();

            // the content of the HTTP response follows the header:
            client.print("<body style = 'background-color: black'>");
            client.print("<div style = 'text-align: center;'><a href=\"/H\"> <button type = 'button' style = 'height: 45vh; width: 45vh; background-color: black; border: 5px solid #C0C0C0; border-radius: 100%;'> <p style = 'font-size:12vh; color: green'> △ <br> </p> </button> </a>");
            client.print("<div style = 'height: 5vh'></div>");;
            client.print("<a href=\"/L\"> <button type = 'button' style = 'height: 45vh; width: 45vh; background-color: black; border: 5px solid #C0C0C0; border-radius: 100%;'> <p style = 'font-size:12vh; color: red'> ▽ <br> </p> </button> </a></div>");

            // The HTTP response ends with another blank line:
            client.println();
            // break out of the while loop:
            break;
          } else {    // if you got a newline, then clear currentLine:
            currentLine = "";
          }
        } else if (c != '\r') {  // if you got anything else but a carriage return character,
          currentLine += c;      // add it to the end of the currentLine
        }

        // Check to see if the client request was "GET /H" or "GET /L":
        if (currentLine.endsWith("GET /H")) {
          if (pos <= 0) {
            for (pos = 0; pos <= 90; pos += 1) { // goes from 0 degrees to 180 degrees
              // in steps of 1 degree
              myservo.write(pos);    // tell servo to go to position in variable 'pos'
              delay(15);             // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position
            }
          }
        }
        if (currentLine.endsWith("GET /L")) {
          if (pos >= 90) {
            for (pos = 90; pos >= 0; pos -= 1) { // goes from 180 degrees to 0 degrees
              myservo.write(pos);    // tell servo to go to position in variable 'pos'
              delay(15);             // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position
            }                // GET /L turns the LED off
          }
        }
      }
    }
    // close the connection:
    client.stop();
    Serial.println("Client Disconnected.");
  }
}

Step 4: Uploading Code

Copy the code in the previous step to the Arduino IDE. Insert your ssid and password into the variables called ssid and password. This is necessary to connect to WIFI.

Next, install the ESP32 servo library under sketch > include > manage libraries > ESP32Servo (click install).

The code should now compile successfully. If it does upload it.

It's important to double check that the library is in your Arduino/libraries folder and that your tools>boards menu is set for the correct ESP.

Step 5: Testing Code

Open the Serial monitor and run the code. The monitor will display the ip address of your board. If it doesn't do this it's possible that your baud rate is set incorrectly, it should be 115200. Type into a browser (preferably on your phone) the ip address. It should bring you to a website as seen in the picture. Next, wire the servo motor to the ESP32: GND to brown, D15 to orange, and 3v3 to red. When the up button on the website is pressed the servo should spin around 90 degrees. Pressing the down arrow will bring the servo back 90 degrees.

This will move the arm piece that raises and lowers the platform with the mouse.

Also, ensure the system works when plugged in to your battery.

Step 6: Assembling

Use Elmer's glue to attach the servo addon to the lift arm.

Insert your USB battery into the cheese slot. Attach the USB micro B cable to the ESP32; then, insert the ESP32 pins up into the slot aligned with the battery. Next, insert the servo motor so the wires face upwards and wrap it into the the slot on the right of the servo. Use tape to keep the wires from sliding out of the cavity. After, attach 3 male to female wires to the servo wires. Then, attach those wires as follows: red to 3V3, orange to D15, and brown to GND. Finally, tape the wires on the wall low enough to avoid the platform and to avoid interfering with the lift arm.

Ensure the platform arm is installed at the correct angle by running the code and putting it in the up position. Then connect the arm slightly past perpendicular to the ground so it will give the platform the most height.

Attach the USB micro B cable to the battery's top USB port. Use tape to keep the wire down and to the side so it doesn't interfere with the platform or arm.

At this point the platform should be placed on top and the mechanism should work.

Next, cut double sided tape and stick it to the flat parts on the bottom of the mouse. Attach the mouse to the platform.

Finally, attach velcro on the bottom of the cheese and on the top of your hat.

Step 7: Finish

Attach the hat to the cheese with the velcro.

Congrats! The hat should now work like the video! Be careful, it's high levels of fashionability may make it a target for jealous (and less fashionable) thieves.

Thank you for reading about my project! I hope you enjoyed it! Feel free to leave questions, comments, or suggestions and if you make it then I'd love to see!

Cheese Speed Challenge

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Cheese Speed Challenge

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    15 Comments

    0
    natalie.ryan460
    natalie.ryan460

    5 months ago

    I love this! Intelligent! you have a gift!

    0
    Farmer Wan
    Farmer Wan

    5 months ago

    Easily the most useful project I've ever seen on Instructables. The World needs more hats and combining with cheese is pure genius. Well done!

    0
    apgoldberg
    apgoldberg

    Reply 5 months ago

    Thanks! I think if there's anything more important for the world than having more hats, its having a clear best!

    0
    mcrowson1257
    mcrowson1257

    5 months ago

    Great Job :D
    This would be a cool name for a punk band.

    0
    apgoldberg
    apgoldberg

    Reply 5 months ago

    Sounds like good marketing! But does the hat even need marketing? I think it will just catch on on its own!

    0
    duncanis
    duncanis

    5 months ago

    Hats off to you!! I thought the project might seem a little old and mouldy but it turned out Gouda! I say you are the head cheese when it comes to cheese hats! I'm looking forward to the next project, Old Fort!

    0
    apgoldberg
    apgoldberg

    Reply 5 months ago

    Thank you, after taking off your hat please replace it with a mechanized cheese fedora your future self will thank you.

    0
    GlueGun_RaR
    GlueGun_RaR

    5 months ago on Step 7

    Cute concept, entertainingly presented. 😎

    0
    Emerald04
    Emerald04

    5 months ago

    This is awesome! I love the little mouse! Great job, good luck!

    0
    apgoldberg
    apgoldberg

    Reply 5 months ago

    Thank you!

    0
    carnarvon
    carnarvon

    5 months ago

    This is absolutely delightful. Kudos!

    0
    apgoldberg
    apgoldberg

    Reply 5 months ago

    Thank you! I'm happy you enjoyed it!

    0
    seamster
    seamster

    5 months ago

    Very nice! I love a fun wacky project. Well done : )

    0
    apgoldberg
    apgoldberg

    Reply 5 months ago

    Thank you!