Pocket First Aid Kit

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Introduction: Pocket First Aid Kit

About: I'm an artist who using just about anything in my art projects, a type of recycling. I haven't posted in a while because my digital camera died and I'm looking for a replacement.

Out hiking or just for a walk and don't want to carry a bulky kit? This will fit into your pocket no trouble!

The ever so versatile Altoids Tin becomes a First Aid Kit to carry with you. Just add stuff from the following steps (or similar).

Step 1: Stuff to Stuff In

I've addded a few thing sI might find handy, things not everyone will have around.
A suture kit (mine isn't sterile, the package got ripped)
Bands Aids (6 large, 6 small)
Moist Towelettes (optional)
Rubber Bands
Tape
Aspirin
Swabs
Paper Towel (or gauze if you have it)
Razor Blades
Super Glue
Betadine
Isopropyl Alcohol


Step 2: Box Prep

On the back side of the box I put 4 layers of tape. A good storage area and easy to get to.

On the front I trimmed down my Red Cross sticker to fit.

Step 3: Inside Cover

Here I taped the 2 Razor blades and the Aspirin. Easier to get to then digging though the box.

Step 4: 1st Layer

I added the bulky/big things here first. The bottles are must small enough to fit and the suture kit lays nice and flat on the bottom. Be sure to sterilize the suture before use with the Betadine or alcohol.

Step 5: Layer 2

Swabs (ends in little bags) and small band aids fit in here.

Step 6: Layer 3

I added a few small pads of paper towel above the small band aids. If you have gauze use that instead.

Step 7: Layer 4

I folded over the edges of the towelettes to help them fit, these are optional as you have gauze(paper towels) and alcohol.

Step 8: Last Layer

The big old band aids sit on top, make sure you can close up the tin after this step. Rearrange if need be.

Step 9: Final Prep

Close tight and wrap the rubber bands around the case. These can be used for tourniquets or to hold things in place where tape doesn't work.

Step 10: Pocket and Go

All done, now put it in your pocket and go.

Any suggestions are appreciated!

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    35 Comments

    0
    oawv803
    oawv803

    13 years ago on Introduction

    I think that for the small space of an altoids can, you did a pretty good job fitting in all the essentials. I was wondering however, where did you get the suture kit? there's only so much butterfly closures can do.

    0
    SashasDoc
    SashasDoc

    Reply 2 months ago

    They're available on Amazon nowadays (13-years after your comment ;-) ). The superglue in the kit can also be used to close a laceration. Although you should not close a laceration if it hasn't been irrigated with sterile solution to remove any contaminants. Granted, if you're in a survival situation, the bleeding will get you before the infection, but only close them if you think you can't get to professional help within a day or so.

    0
    nnygamer
    nnygamer

    Reply 13 years ago on Introduction

    My brother used to be in the rescue squad, the suture kit was expired and he gave it to me.

    0
    WereCheetah
    WereCheetah

    Reply 12 years ago on Introduction

    They have a time and a place. To reduce the risk of losing a limb though you should open them up every 15 minutes.

    0
    SashasDoc
    SashasDoc

    Reply 2 months ago

    I would say that only applies if you have the advanced medical training to manage such a patient, which means the capability to do a field amputation if you fail to bring the bleeding under control after releasing and then retightening the tourniquet. For the layman, once applied, the tourniquet should remain tight and in place, with the time it was applied annotated on the victim's forehead in marker or blood (if a marker is unavailable).

    0
    SashasDoc
    SashasDoc

    Reply 2 months ago

    It's life over limb. If you cannot stop the bleeding with direct pressure and pressure points, a properly applied tourniquet will save their life at the cost of a limb. You should assume the limb will be lost when you apply the tourniquet.

    Rubber bands aren't the best choice though. Narrow items like rubber bands and shoelaces damage the underlying tissues and should the limb be salvageable once the victim receives medical care, using narrow items as tourniquets can result in permanent nerve and vascular damage. Ideally, the item used for a tourniquet should be about 1" wide, but--that said--applying it when needed to preserve life is more important that the other considerations.

    0
    buggvin
    buggvin

    10 years ago on Introduction

    Thanks for sharing this... When I was a Boy Scout, we used to make these out of portable sewing kits, made of plastic and they would break easily. Now that my kids are starting Scouts, I wanted to recreate the little first aid kit, and using the Altoid tin is a great twist. We also made a "Get Lost" kit in a 35 mm film canister... wish I could remember that one as well.

    0
    SashasDoc
    SashasDoc

    Reply 2 months ago

    Old Boy Scout here too. I recall that our version of the "Get Lost" kit had a few quarters in the bottom to call for help from a pay phone (good luck using THAT today! ;-) ) along with some fishing line, lead shot, and a hook for fishing, some waterproof matches for starting a fire, and maybe some thread, a sewing needle, and a button or two to fix gear on the go.

    0
    MakerCL
    MakerCL

    10 years ago on Introduction

    You should add some allergy meds and tylenol so that you can treet even more things

    0
    SashasDoc
    SashasDoc

    Reply 2 months ago

    I was thinking that Tylenol, Benadryl, Motrin, etc all come in their own individual dose packs now (available at the supermarket for traveling) that are about the same size as the aspirin in this kit and could just as easily be taped up inside the lid. Or, just use the same method to add more--should probably label the clear bags though with a small label identifying the drug, dose (mg/tablet), and expiration date.

    Great solution nnygamer! Love the whole thing!

    0
    Slamjam
    Slamjam

    7 years ago on Introduction

    Great idea. Can't seem to find any containers small enough to put alcohol or betadine in though. Also I am confused by the first slide. I see what appears to be gauze on the bottom (outside) of the tin.

    On the back side of the box I put 4 layers of tape. A good storage area and easy to get to.

    Is the tape under the gauze? Why is the gauze on the outside and not on the inside?

    0
    SashasDoc
    SashasDoc

    Reply 2 months ago

    What appears to be gauze is actually the cloth tape widely used in medicine. A clever solution to get more items in/on the tin. It comes in a variety of widths with 1"-3" being common. Might want to add a small "courtesy tab" to one end to make the tape easier to remove--to do so, just fold over the edge of one end of the tape back onto itself (adhesive-to-adhesive) to make a tab.

    0
    sarah209
    sarah209

    Reply 6 years ago

    Sephora has teeny sample vials that would be perfect. Maybe include a sample of sunblock since you are hanging out at Sephora bumming vials, anyway.

    0
    MicheleF
    MicheleF

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    try eye drops bottles for your alcohol and betadine

    0
    candogoods
    candogoods

    8 years ago on Introduction

    If someone decides to lose a finger put it in a bag and then PUT THE BAG in the ice water or ice. Don't expose the flesh to the ice or water.

    0
    cowtipper97
    cowtipper97

    14 years ago on Introduction

    This is cool. I have been looking for an Instructable on one of these for a long time. Right now I can think of 3 thing to add to it, finger/toenail clippers, small scissor that are made for cutting of loose flesh off wounds are good for cutting into limbs to get something out, and needles (also are good in a small surgery to remove something)

    0
    nnygamer
    nnygamer

    Reply 14 years ago on Introduction

    I think a few needles and thread can be thrown in, they don't take up much room. As for scissors, that's why I put in 2 razor blades. Much smaller and sharper. Nail clippers would help, but I'm out of room! Tweezers too, but no room.
    Maybe adding a second tin to put more stuff in would work and still keep it pocket size.

    0
    shizumadrive
    shizumadrive

    Reply 8 years ago on Introduction

    That's why the Swiss invented their army knives. Scissors, tweezers and all the stuff you cant fit in this. Cool idea of things I ought to have around with me.

    0
    emersunrose
    emersunrose

    Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

    very small tweezers: Uncle Bill's Sliver Grippers. They're *very* pointy, so they can really get in there, find the intruding object, and pull it right out. Love them.