RAM Trivot (hot Plate)

Introduction: RAM Trivot (hot Plate)

Use old sticks of RAM to keep the hot pans from burning your kitchen table. Quick and easy to make.

Step 1: Select and Prepare Sticks of RAM

Find RAM that look similar to one another. Using RAM with memory banks on only one side works best, as there are flat surfaces to glue together. Make sure all sticks are clean, then arrange to fit. I wanted my trivot to be symetrical, so I cut the pins off of one of the sticks with a dremel.

WARNING! If you cut RAM, who knows what kinds of metals were used; lead or other toxic metal dust could result. Use appropriate protective gear.

Step 2: Arrange and Glue

Arrange the RAM, then glue it. I used Amazing Goop, as that's what I had, and it's strong. Notice the two small piece of wood acting as straight edges to line up the RAM.

Two sticks are placed memory banks down. These are the "feet". The other sticks are placed memory banks up.

Step 3: Finishing

Sand any sharp corners.

Lacquer the glued sticks. The lacquer will make it shiney, and help protect against possible lead or other materials.

Optional: Attach feet to the bottom to keep the table from getting scratched. Felt, cork or hot-glue dots work great.

Step 4: You're Done!

Put the trivot in your kitchen and cook a meal for your S.O.!

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    8 Comments

    0
    pr3tard
    pr3tard

    14 years ago on Step 1

    With the danger of chemicals and metals coming from the RAM, why would you want to make something like this for kitchen use? Could a hot pan coming out of the oven, or off the stove cause any of the solder points to melt? Cool looking retechnology, but it doesn't seem like it is a very good idea.

    0
    omnibot
    omnibot

    Reply 13 years ago on Introduction

    I doubt anything edible will ever reach the temperature needed to melt solder even for cold-solder. Most things never go above 100 degrees celsius (at wich point water boils).

    0
    wperry1
    wperry1

    14 years ago

    Pretty cool but my wife would NEVER let me put that on the kitchen table ;-)

    0
    stuporglue
    stuporglue

    Reply 14 years ago

    I was wondering if my wife would too...she was skeptical, but supportive. I'm guessing it'll end up in the back of the drawer, unless I pull it out.

    0
    Murf
    Murf

    Reply 14 years ago

    This IS an awesome idea.... And I AM moving out soon... its just too bad I don't have some old RAM I could use cause I would definately make a few of these... stylish and conventional :P

    0
    Scurl!
    Scurl!

    14 years ago

    i've got a drawer full of this stuff (8 and 16 meg sticks)m but i could never bring myself to use it like this. im' convinced i WILL someday take over the world with an army of robots made from 2 and 386's all controlled by a dreamcast. and then who'll laugh?!?! not me, i'll be too busy licking honey off a models backside to laugh...

    0
    mikesty
    mikesty

    14 years ago

    Damn, that's some old RAM. We used to have an old pickle jar full of that, along with ancient procs and heatsinks.