Realistic RC Car

Introduction: Realistic RC Car

In this instructable you will learn how to wire the necessary hardware for a realistic RC car. Well what is a realistic RC car? This means it is a RC car that is realistic to a real automobile, it features four wheel drive, a fuel level indicator, and functioning headlights with indicators and hazards. This is a rather large project, so the instructions will be split into 3 main sections, the very first step is to gather all the supplies listed below.

Supplies

  • Arduino Uno R3 x 2

  • 9v battery x 3

  • Mini breadboard x 4

  • Light bulb x 4

  • Relay SPDT x 4

  • Power supply x 1

  • Slide switch x 4

  • H - bridge x 2

  • Hobby gearmotor x 4

  • Pushbutton x 4

  • 1k ohm resistor x 4

  • 0.10uf capacitor x 1

  • 1M ohm resistor x 1

  • 470 ohm resistor x 2

  • NE 555 timer x 1

  • 4 pin Ultrasonic distance sensor x 1

  • 7 segment display x 2

  • White LED x 10

  • A large assortment of jumper wires

Step 1: Part 1 Headlights

This is the first of three parts, in this section you will wire the headlights for your RC car. First collect the supplies needed for this section:

  • Arduino Uno R3 x 1
  • 9v battery x 1
  • Mini breadboard x 1
  • Light bulb x 4
  • Relay SPDT x 4
  • Power supply x 1
  • Slide switch x 1
  • A large assortment of jumper wires

Next take all 4 light bulbs, place two at the front left of your car and two at the front right of your car, these will be your headlights. Next take your power supply, using a jumper wire connect one pin of each lightbulb to the power pin of your power supply. Then take all four SPDT relays and lay them side by side in a line, using a jumper wire connect the other pin of the far left lightbulb to terminal 6 of the far left relay. Repeat this step so each lightbulb is connected to its own relay.

Step 2: Part 1: Connecting Relays

Now we will connect the relays to the arduino, first using a jumper wire connect terminal 1 of the far left relay to the negative pin of the power supply. Repeat this for all the relays so each relays terminal 1 is connected to the negative pin of the power supply. Next using a jumper wire connect terminal 5 of each relay to the ground pin on the arduino, the ground pin is found on the right side of the arduino next to the 5v pin. Next using a jumper wire connect terminal 8 of the far right relay to digital pin 8 on the arduino, pin 8 is found on the left side of the arduino. Next using a jumper wire connect terminal 8 of the middle right realy to digital pin 9 on the arduino, then using another jumper wire connect terminal 8 of the middle left relay to digital pin 10 on the arduino. Finally using another jumper wire connect terminal 8 of the far left relay to digital pin 11 on the arduino. Now the relays and lightbulbs are fully connected to the arduino.

Step 3: Part 1: Headlight Controller

First place the mini breadboard down under your arduino and slightly to the left, make sure your breadboard is horizontal so the line dividing the two sides in the middle should be horizontal. First on the left side of your breadboard place three slide switches, two should be right next to each other on the bottom half of the breadboard and the other should be above on the other side of the breadboard. Next take your 9v battery and place it under your breadboard, using a jumper wire connect the positive pin of your battery to the positive rail of the breadboard found at the very top of the breadboard. Next connect the negative pin of the battery to the ground pin on the arduino which is found on the left side next to digital pin 13. Using a jumper wire connect the common pin (the middle pin) of the switch that is above the other two switches to digital pin 13 on the arduino. Next connect terminal 2 (the pin on the right) of the same switch to the power rail on the top of the breadboard with a jumper wire. Next connect the common pin (the middle pin) of the switch, which is under and to the left of the one you just connect, to digital pin 12 of the arduino. Next connect terminal 2 (the pin on the right) of the same switch to the power rail at the top of the breadboard with a jumper wire. Then connect terminal 1 (the pin on the left) of the same switch to the ground rail at the bottom of the breadboard. Next connect terminal 1(the pin on the left) of the switch just to the right of the last switch you connected, to the ground rail at the bottom of the breadboard with a jumper wire. Next connect terminal 2 (the pin on the right) of the same switch to the power rail at the very top of the breadboard with a jumper wire. Then using a jumper wire connect the common pin (the middle pin) of the same switch to pin A5, this is an analog input pin found on the right side of the arduino. Finally using a breadboard connect the ground rail found at the bottom of the breadboard to the ground pin found on the right side of the arduino which is next to the 5v pin.

Step 4: Part 1: Explanation

Now you have wired the headlights of your soon to be RC car, now you need to know how it works. There are three switches, there is one above and then two under. The switch on the top is what controls the headlights turning on and off, when in the left position the lights will be off and when in the right the lights will turn on. This is due to when in the right position the switch allows power to flow to the pin on the arduino, it reads that pin and when it reads that there is power it sends power to the relays which switches the lightbulbs on. Next the two switches on the bottom, these work in the exact same way as the other switch, yet when these switches allow power through the arduino will flash the headlights, if you move the switch on the right then the headlights on the right will flash and the same with the left. If both switches move then all the lights will flash, but they will only flash if the on and off switch is also turned on. So now you understand how your headlights and indicators work, now it's time to give this car a fuel tank.

Step 5: Part 2 Fuel Tank Indicator

This is the second part of your RC car, in this section you will wire the fuel tank indicator for your RC car. First let's gather the supplies needed:

  • Everything built in Part 1
  • Mini breadboard x 1
  • 0.10uf capacitor x 1
  • 1M ohm resistor x 1
  • 470 ohm resistor x 2
  • NE 555 timer x 1
  • 4 pin Ultrasonic distance sensor x 1
  • 7 segment display x 2
  • White LED x 10
  • A large assortment of jumper wires

*Note: the arduino used in this section is the same one from the past section

Firstly take your mini breadboard and place it to the left of the arduino, make sure your breadboard is horizontal. Next, using a jumper wire, connect the power rail at the top of the breadboard to the 5v pin on the arduino that is found on the right side of the arduino. Next connect the ground rail on the top of the breadboard to the ground pin on the arduino, found next to the 5v pin, using a jumper wire. Finally connect the top ground rail and the bottom ground rail on the breadboard using a jumper wire on the far left side of the board.

Step 6: Part 2: Connecting the Timer

Next you need your NE 555 timer, place this over the middle of your breadboard, so half of the pins are on the top half of the breadboard and the other pins are on the bottom half of the bread board. Make sure the notch in the NE 555 timer is facing away from the arduino, so it should be on the left side of the timer. Next using a jumper wire connect the power pin of the timer (the top far left pin in the orientation for this situation) to the power rail at the top of the breadboard. Next connect the ground pin (the bottom far left pin in the orientation for this situation) of the timer to the ground rail at the bottom of the breadboard with a jumper wire. Next choose one of the open lines in the breadboard to the right of the timer, on this rail place a jumper wire over the middle of the breadboard connecting the two sides of the board. Next on that same line connect the line to the power rail at the top of the breadboard using the !M ohm resistor. Next connect the bottom of the same line to the ground rail at the bottom of the breadboard using the 0.10uf capacitor. Next, using a jumper wire connect the trigger pin (the bottom middle left pin in the orientation for this situation) of the timer to the line on the breadboard with the capacitor and resistor. Then using another two jumper wires connect the discharge pin (the top middle left pin in the orientation for this situation) and threshold pin (the top middle right pin in the orientation for this situation) to the line on the breadboard with the resistor and capacitor.

Step 7: Part 2: Connecting the Distance Sensor

Start by placing the ultrasonic sensor under the arduino. Next, using a jumper wire, connect the power pin of the ultrasonic sensor to the 5v pin on the arduino. Then using a jumper wire connect the ground pin of the sensor to the ground pin on the arduino found next to digital pin 13. Next, using another jumper wire, connect the trigger pin of the sensor to the output pin (the bottom middle right pin in the orientation for this situation) of the NE 555 timer on the breadboard. Finally connect the echo pin of the ultrasonic distance sensor to digital pin 7 on the arduino.

Step 8: Part 2: Connecting the 7 Segment Displays and LED's

First place one 7 segment display at the top right corner of the breadboard with the switches from Part 1, then place the second 7 segment display at the bottom right corner of the breadboard. Then place two LED's side by side, tight next to the top 7 segment display, then place two more under that in a straight line. Continue to place the pairs of LEDS under each other until you reach the bottom second 7 segment display, once finished you should have two straight lines of leds side by side with 5 leds in each row, going from the middle of one 7 segment display to the middle of the other. Now using jumper wires connect the anodes of each part of LEDS, then connect the cathodes of each part of LEDS as well. Next using jumper wires, vertically connect all of the cathodes of the LEDS on the left side of each pair. Then connect one end of one 470 ohm resistor to the cathode of one of the LEDs at the top of the line, then connect the other end of the resistor to the ground rail at the bottom of the breadboard with the timer on it, using a jumper wire. Then connect the anode pin of the LED on the right of the first part of LEDS, to digital pin 2 on the arduino. Then continue to connect the anode of the right LED of each pair to the next digital pin, for example for the next pair of LEDs under the top ones connect them to digital pin 3, and then the next to digital pin 4 and so on until you reach digital pin 6. Next connect using a jumper wire connect the common pin of both 7 segment displays to the farthest right line on the breadboard with the switches. Then using jumper wires connect pin A,E,F, and G of the top 7 segment display to the second most farthest line of the breadboard with the switches. Next using jumper wires connect pin A,D,E,F, and G of the bottom 7 segment display to the second most farthest line of the breadboard with the switches. Finally connect the line of the breadboard with the common pins connected to it, to the power rail at the top of the breadboard, then connect the line of the bread board with all of the lettered pins connected to it, to the ground rail at the bottom of the breadboard, using one 470 ohm resistor.

Step 9: Part 2: Explanation

You have now successfully built and wired your fuel level indicator, now you need to know how it actually works. The NE 555 timer sends power to the trigger pin of the distance sensor in intervals which are controlled by the capacitor and resistor connected to the timer. The distance sensor then sends out a sound wave and counts how long it takes for it to bounce off an object and then return, it then sends that information to the arduino, and based on the distance of in this case the fuel the LEDs will show if the tank is close to empty or full which is shown by the 7 segments displays. This is built for a fuel tank that is ten inches deep, so the sensor is at the top of the tank and if it reads that the fuel is very close to the top then it will show full with the LEDs and if the fuel is closer to the bottom of the tank then it will show almost empty and every level that the indicator shows is in intervals of 2 inches, so if it shows the middle LEDs are on then it has anywhere between 4 to 6 inches of the fuel tank left.

Step 10: Part 1 & 2 Code

Simply use this code for the arduino that is used in part 1 and 2. If troubles occur ensure that you have the code written correctly and all of you digital pins match the ones declared within the code.

int Leftblinker = 12;
int Rightblinker = A5;

int headlights = 13;

int farRightheadlights = 8;

int Rightheadlights = 9;

int farLeftheadlights = 11;

int Leftheadlights = 10;

int S = 0;

int L = 0;

int R = 0;

int LEDlevel1 = 6;

int LEDlevel2 = 5;

int LEDlevel3 = 4;

int LEDlevel4 = 3;

int LEDlevel5 = 2;

int fuelLevel = 7;

int val3 = 0;

int val4 = 0;

int distance = 0;

void setup(){

pinMode(Leftblinker, INPUT);

pinMode(Rightblinker, INPUT);

pinMode(headlights, INPUT);

pinMode(farRightheadlights, OUTPUT);

pinMode(Rightheadlights, OUTPUT);

pinMode(farLeftheadlights, OUTPUT);

pinMode(Leftheadlights, OUTPUT);

pinMode(fuelLevel, INPUT);

pinMode(LEDlevel5, OUTPUT);

pinMode(LEDlevel4, OUTPUT);

pinMode(LEDlevel3, OUTPUT);

pinMode(LEDlevel2, OUTPUT);

pinMode(LEDlevel1, OUTPUT); }

void loop(){

val3 = pulseIn(fuelLevel, HIGH);

val4 = val3/2; distance = val4/74; i

f(distance < 2){

digitalWrite(LEDlevel1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel2, HIGH);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel3, HIGH);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel4, HIGH);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel5, HIGH);

}else if(distance < 4 && distance > 2){

digitalWrite(LEDlevel1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel2, HIGH);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel3, HIGH);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel4, HIGH);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel5, LOW);

}else if(distance < 6 && distance > 4){

digitalWrite(LEDlevel1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel2, HIGH);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel3, HIGH);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel4, LOW);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel5, LOW);

}else if(distance < 8 && distance > 6){

digitalWrite(LEDlevel1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel2, HIGH);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel3, LOW);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel4, LOW);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel5, LOW);

}else if(distance < 10 && distance > 8){

digitalWrite(LEDlevel1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel2, LOW);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel3, LOW);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel4, LOW);

digitalWrite(LEDlevel5, LOW);

}

S = digitalRead(headlights);

L = digitalRead(Leftblinker);

R = digitalRead(Rightblinker);

if(S == HIGH && L == LOW && R == LOW){

digitalWrite(farRightheadlights, HIGH);

digitalWrite(Rightheadlights, HIGH);

digitalWrite(Leftheadlights, HIGH);

digitalWrite(farLeftheadlights, HIGH);

}else if(S == HIGH && L == HIGH && R == LOW){

digitalWrite(farRightheadlights, HIGH);

digitalWrite(Rightheadlights, HIGH);

digitalWrite(Leftheadlights, HIGH);

digitalWrite(farLeftheadlights, HIGH);

delay(1000);

digitalWrite(farRightheadlights, HIGH);

digitalWrite(Rightheadlights, HIGH);

digitalWrite(Leftheadlights, LOW);

digitalWrite(farLeftheadlights, LOW);

delay(100);

}else if(S == HIGH && L == LOW && R == HIGH){

digitalWrite(farRightheadlights, HIGH);

digitalWrite(Rightheadlights, HIGH);

digitalWrite(Leftheadlights, HIGH);

digitalWrite(farLeftheadlights, HIGH);

delay(1000);

digitalWrite(farRightheadlights, LOW);

digitalWrite(Rightheadlights, LOW);

digitalWrite(Leftheadlights, HIGH);

digitalWrite(farLeftheadlights, HIGH);

delay(100);

}else if(S == HIGH && L == HIGH && R == HIGH){

digitalWrite(farRightheadlights, HIGH);

digitalWrite(Rightheadlights, HIGH);

digitalWrite(Leftheadlights, HIGH);

digitalWrite(farLeftheadlights, HIGH);

delay(1000);

digitalWrite(farRightheadlights, LOW);

digitalWrite(Rightheadlights, LOW);

digitalWrite(Leftheadlights, LOW);

digitalWrite(farLeftheadlights, LOW);

delay(100);

}else{

digitalWrite(farRightheadlights, LOW);

digitalWrite(Rightheadlights, LOW);

digitalWrite(Leftheadlights, LOW);

digitalWrite(farLeftheadlights, LOW);

}

delay(100);

}

Step 11: Part 3 Motors

Finally part three, the last section of this project will show you how to wire your motors for your RC car. This RC car has all wheel drive, each motor can be individually coded. The steering movement is of a tank, it has a forward and backward motion and it can also turn either left or right on the spot. The supplies you will need for this section are:

  • Arduino Uno R3 x 1
  • 9v battery x 2
  • Mini breadboard x 2
  • Slide switch x 1
  • H - bridge x 2
  • Hobby gearmotor x 4
  • Pushbutton x 4
  • 1k ohm resistor x 4
  • A large assortment of jumper wires

First place one breadboard to the left of the breadboard with the switches for the headlights, then place the last breadboard above and to the left of the one you just placed. Then place the arduino to the left of the breadboard you just placed, make sure both the breadboards are horizontal and the side of the arduino with the reset button and ports to connect to a PC should be on the right away from the breadboard it is next to. Finally place two motors under each set of headlights with the actual motor part facing down away from the headlights, then under those motors place two more inverted compared to the ones you just placed. Next place one 9v battery to the right of the breadboard that is next to the arduino, using jumper wires connect the positive pin of the battery to the top power rail of the breadboard and the negative pin of the battery to the top negative rail of the breadboard. Then connect the 5v pin of the arduino to the bottom power rail on the breadboard, then connect the ground pin found next to the 5v pin on the arduino to the bottom ground rail on the breadboard.

Step 12: Part 3: Connecting the H-bridges

Take one of the two H-bridges and place it on the far left of the bread board that is next to the arduino, make sure it is over the middle so some of the pins are on one side of the board and the other half are on the other side. Ensure that the notch in the H-bridge is facing away from the arduino so it should be on the right, place the second H-bridge right next to the first one in the same orientation. For the first H-bridge found on the right, connect the two ground pins found on the top side of the chip to the ground rail of the breadboard using jumper wires. Next connect the two ground pins on the bottom side of the H-bridge to the ground rail at the bottom of the bread board. Next connect the power 1 pin of the H-bridge to the power rail on the bottom of the breadboard, then connect the power 2 pin to the power rail at the top of the breadboard. Then using a jumper wire connect the enable 3 & 4 pin to the enable 1 & 2 of the H-bridge, then using a jumper wire connect enable 3 & 4 to digital pin 5 on the arduino. Then using jumper wires connect input 4 pin to digital pin 3, input 3 pin to digital pin 4, input 2 pin to digital pin 6, and input 1 pin to digital pin 7 on the arduino. Repeat all of these connections for the second H-bridge, yet instead using jumper wires connect input 4 pin to digital pin 8, input 3 pin to digital pin 9, input 2 pin to digital pin 11, input 1 pin to digital pin 12, and enable 3 & 4 pin to digital pin 10 on the arduino.

Step 13: Part 3: Connecting Motors

Using jumper wires connect the positive pin of the bottom left motor to output 1 pin on the H-bridge to the left, then connect the negative pin of the bottom left motor to output 2 pin on the H-bridge to the left. Next using jumper wires connect the positive pin of the bottom right motor to output 3 pins on the H-bridge to the left, then connect the negative pin of the bottom right motor to output 4 pins on the H-bridge to the left.


Next using jumper wires connect the positive pin of the top left motor to output 1 pin on the H-bridge to the right, then connect the negative pin of the top left motor to output 2 pin on the H-bridge to the right. Then using jumper wires connect the positive pin of the top right motor to output 3 pins on the H-bridge to the right, then connect the negative pin of the top right motor to output 4 pins on the H-bridge to the right.

Step 14: Part 3: Connecting the Control Panel

First place the final 9v battery to the left to the last breadboard that has not been used up until this point. Next, using a jumper wire, connect the positive pin of the battery to the power rail on the top of the breadboard, then connect the negative pin on the battery to the ground pin on the arduino found next to the 5v pin. Next connect the ground tail at the bottom of the breadboard to the ground pin on the arduino found next to digital pin 13. Next place the four push buttons on the breadboard in a line side by side, make sure each button is placed over the middle of the breadboard. Half the pins are on one side and the other half are on the other side of the breadboard. Then place the last slide switch to the left of the buttons on the top half of the breadboard. Next using a jumper wire connect the common pin (the middle pin) of the switch to digital pin 13 on the arduino. Then connect terminal 2(the right pin) of the switch to the power rail at the top of the bread board. Next connect the bottom right pin of the button on the far left to the ground rail at the bottom of the breadboard using one of four 1k ohm resistors. Then connect the top left pin of the same button to the power rail at the top of the breadboard using a jumper wire. Finally connect the top right pin of the same button to pin A0 on the arduino using a jumper wire. Repeat the connection steps for each button yet for each button move on pin to the right for the pins on the arduino, for example for the button to the right of the one we just connected would be connected to A1 and then the next to A2 and so on until you reach A3.

Step 15: Part 3: Explanation

You are now done building and wiring the motors for your RC car, but how do they work. The switch on your breadboard is the ignition, so if this is not on then the motors wont turn. This is due to when the switch is moved it allows a current to flow to the arduino telling it that the motors are allowed to move. The buttons use the same concept, yet they control the direction, hold the first button from left to right to go forward, the second to go backward, the third to go right, and the last button to go left.

Step 16: Part 3: Code

For the arduino used in part 3 use the code shown here to allow your RC car to run. How the code works is it constantly checks for when the ignition switch is on or off, when it is off nothing can happen . Yet when the switch is on it reads the pin as high, so the it send a high or low value to the input pins on the H-bridge to move the motors dependent on which buttons you press giving it values of high or low, for example if the switch is on it will read it as high and if the forward button is pressed it will read that button as high and the reset as low, it will then send high and lows of certain motors to make it go forward.

int controlPinA1 = 3;
int controlPinA2 = 4;

int controlPinB1 = 6;

int controlPinB2 = 7;

int controlPinC1 = 8;

int controlPinC2 = 9;

int controlPinD1 = 11;

int controlPinD2 = 12;

int enablePinAB = 5;

int enablePinCD = 10;

int start = 13;

int forward = A0;

int backward = A1;

int right = A2;

int left = A3;

int val = 0;

int Fvalue = 0;

int Bvalue = 0;

int Rvalue = 0;

int Lvalue = 0;

void setup() {

pinMode(controlPinA1, OUTPUT);

pinMode(controlPinA2, OUTPUT);

pinMode(controlPinB1, OUTPUT);

pinMode(controlPinB2, OUTPUT);

pinMode(controlPinC1, OUTPUT);

pinMode(controlPinC2, OUTPUT);

pinMode(controlPinD1, OUTPUT);

pinMode(controlPinD2, OUTPUT);

pinMode(enablePinAB, OUTPUT);

pinMode(enablePinCD, OUTPUT);

pinMode(forward, INPUT);

pinMode(backward, INPUT);

pinMode(right, INPUT);

pinMode(left, INPUT);

pinMode(start, INPUT);

}

void loop() {

val = digitalRead(start);

if(val == HIGH){

Fvalue = digitalRead(forward);

Bvalue = digitalRead(backward);

Lvalue = digitalRead(left);

Rvalue = digitalRead(right);

if(Fvalue == HIGH){

digitalWrite(enablePinAB, HIGH);

digitalWrite(enablePinCD, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinA1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinA2, LOW);

digitalWrite(controlPinB1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinB2, LOW);

digitalWrite(controlPinC1, LOW);

digitalWrite(controlPinC2, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinD1, LOW);

digitalWrite(controlPinD2, HIGH);

}else if(Bvalue == HIGH){

digitalWrite(enablePinAB, HIGH);

digitalWrite(enablePinCD, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinA1, LOW);

digitalWrite(controlPinA2, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinB1, LOW);

digitalWrite(controlPinB2, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinC1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinC2, LOW);

digitalWrite(controlPinD1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinD2, LOW);

}else if(Lvalue == HIGH){

digitalWrite(enablePinAB, HIGH);

digitalWrite(enablePinCD, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinA1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinA2, LOW);

digitalWrite(controlPinB1, LOW);

digitalWrite(controlPinB2, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinC1, LOW);

digitalWrite(controlPinC2, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinD1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinD2, LOW);

}else if(Rvalue == HIGH){

digitalWrite(enablePinAB, HIGH);

digitalWrite(enablePinCD, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinA1, LOW);

digitalWrite(controlPinA2, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinB1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinB2, LOW);

digitalWrite(controlPinC1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinC2, LOW);

digitalWrite(controlPinD1, LOW);

digitalWrite(controlPinD2, HIGH);

}else{

digitalWrite(controlPinA1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinA2, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinB1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinB2, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinC1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinC2, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinD1, HIGH);

digitalWrite(controlPinD2, HIGH);

}

}

delay(1000);

}

Step 17: Finished!!!! =)

You are finally done with the wiring and hardware for your RC car, now it is up to you to build the best looking car to put all of these components in. Make sure that your fuel tank is 10 inches deep and the distance sensor is placed at the top of the tank. I hope this was a helpful tutorial and you can make your own fun and speedy RC cars.

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    2 Comments

    0
    AndreeaE1
    AndreeaE1

    1 year ago

    well done! such an ambitious project to be done in TinkerCAD and while Distance Learning:) great breakdown of all it parts

    0
    kcraske
    kcraske

    1 year ago

    I like how this demonstrates that a large project can be broken down into parts, each of which comparatively simply yet the end complex.
    One thing I must have missed somewhere. Where is the RC aspect.