Renew Your Laptop Battery

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35

Introduction: Renew Your Laptop Battery

Change Your Laptop Battery cells instead of buying expensive new battery...

2 People Made This Project!

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35 Discussions

0
kovacs.aj
kovacs.aj

6 months ago

Hi All,
my laptop tells me the battery is dead and i searched for a solution how can i renew by my own hand. So,i opened a battery and did a simple measure and i faced a hard surprise...
My cells have a 9.28V voltage and the computer tells the battery is dead, it is mean for me a bit more than 90% charged...
So, am i missed something or it is a force to buy a new one? Is my battery good and just the notebook claims as battery dead? Sorry for my english, i hope everybody can understand.
I attached two images about this issue.

IMG_1512.jpegIMG_1511.jpeg
0
Ethan1976
Ethan1976

3 years ago

If the battery is a 2100 mhA can i use new 18650 cells of 4000mhA? will not change the output?

0
yaly
yaly

Reply 3 years ago

It will only last longer, but make sure it has the same physical size, should be the same if both are 18650s.

0
Tyran Tesmer
Tyran Tesmer

4 years ago

Hi I've replaced cells of my 8-10 year old Fujitsu laptop with cheep cells but only got the same lifespan (45min tops). After re-soldering the pack and even replacing the original set of cells the laptop now alternates between 99% charged and 0% capacity continuously every 3 seconds or so and shuts down immediately once the AC power is shut down.

Could I have damaged the battery circuit?

0
PsychoDrake
PsychoDrake

7 years ago on Introduction

If the battery is a 2100 mhA can i use new 18650 cells of 4000mhA? will not change the output?

0
thethiefmaster
thethiefmaster

Reply 4 years ago

It's a bit late, but for anyone else wondering, there are no (true) 4000 mAh cells yet. The highest at time of writing is 3500 mAh. Anything claiming higher is a total fake.

0
gnanmorder
gnanmorder

Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

As long as the voltage is the same as the old batteries, you'll be ok.

0
NisalP
NisalP

5 years ago on Introduction

This is a waste of money and time. I replaced my toshiba battery with new cells but buttery itself doesn't identify new cells. The problem is there is a microchip in battery which has the details of the battery. To reset the battery you have to reset the values on EEPROM of battery too. If you can find a datasheet of the MCU you maybe able to reset it by grounding the RESET| pin. Be causes!!!. Otherwise you have to use be2works software and GPIO cable. But you will not find it for free on internet. Best option is to go for a duplicate battery on ebay and replace the cells with orginal s3 battery before using it.

0
SheikhM
SheikhM

5 years ago on Introduction

How can i define which kind of cell i need to replace my dead cell of my laptop battery? My product is "Dell Vostro 1540 6 Cell battery". 4400 mAh, 6 cell.

There is no mention of volt, mAh rate on the cell.

Also please tell me where from can I buy and collect these cells? My local store doesn't hav these.

0
glendalf81
glendalf81

8 years ago on Introduction

nice job but would it be possible to use NiMH batteries, they seem to be able to withstand a high number of charges

0
morigen
morigen

Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

2 years is late for a reply but the answer to your question is "NO". Not unless you change the charging circuit to suit different kind batteries.

0
DanielE15
DanielE15

Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

the chemical makeup of the cells should matter less than the actual maximum discharge current (measured in Amps) that the cell can withstand. As a rule of thumb, the higher the rated Ampere of a rechargeable lithium cell, the longer it's lifespan (because it takes less damage on recharging than a cell which can withstand a lower current)

0
dvdspeler
dvdspeler

5 years ago on Introduction

Hmm I did this with my t400 thinkpad, expected 10.8A with 9 cells

Unfortunately when I connected it, it blew up the charging board. I'm glad my laptop is OK!

any clue what happened? I used fully charged cells. Too much juice I'm guessing...

0
DanielE15
DanielE15

Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

Some of the cells in the pack must have had different amperage and/or were nearing their lifespan. Happens a lot with cheap knockoff cells that are more-than-often repackaged dead cells from the recycle bin.

That's why the multimeter is a geek's best friend :I

0
chris2u
chris2u

5 years ago on Introduction

8 Samsung batteries for $17, these days, would be Chinese "fakes"!...When the Chinese rate a cell at 5000mAh, it means 500mAh in real life.....So you could expect a capacity of about 1Ah all up..

Genuine Samsungs or Panasonics are at least $13 each..

So cheaper to buy a new battery..

Surprisingly Laptop batteries from China are quite good with reasonable capacity.

Probably worth buying a laptop battery to get some half decent cells for your torch .

So don't throw that old battery away..pull it apart and check the cells with a meter, you may find a pair of dead ones and the others are OK :)

0
DanielE15
DanielE15

Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

Not if you get them shipped str8 from the factory off Alibaba.

High-end 3100mah 20Amp Efest batteries (which have an authentication code sticker on each cell that you can verify on their site) are 4 to 6 usd per cell at most (not including shipping tho)

But yea, gotta' be careful of obvious knockoffs like those laughably tagged 6000mah batteries you might come across.

0
DanielE15
DanielE15

5 years ago on Introduction

Wow, didn't even have to connect the new battery pack in parallel to the chip before desoldering the old one?!

AND the chip shows 100% right off?!!

:o

NiceGuyHP.jpg

^v^

0
JewelA1
JewelA1

5 years ago on Introduction

t is only dangerous if you don't know what you are doing. Laptop batteries can take A LOT before they actually become dangerous.. Shorting them out, or deliberately placing them in a fire or anywhere hot.