Repair Mouse With Double Click Problem

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Introduction: Repair Mouse With Double Click Problem

I have a Logitech wireless laser mouse and after a year or so of use, the left click button would double click every time I tried to single click something. As can be imagined, this gets frustrating very fast. So, being the tinkerer that I am, I decided to open her up and see if it could be repaired. Sure enough, It's a pretty simple fix, if you have some common tools and a teaspoon (edit:a tablespoon) of patience. There are some very small parts involved, so you will want to make sure you ware working in a well lit, clean environment so that any parts that are dropped can be easily found. I have now performed this fix for the third time and decided to take pictures this time to share with others who may find this useful. Each time the repair lasts about 6 months to a year before needing to be redone. I imagine at some point the piece causing the problem will break, at which time the mouse will need to be replaced (unless you're determined enough to try and source parts). Good luck with your repair, I hope this helps.

EDIT: There are quite a few comments about the difficulty of step 8. I would advise that you read through some of the comments for various approaches to completing that part of the repair.

Step 1: Remove Batteries

If you are working on a wireless mouse, you will want to first open the battery cover, and remove the batteries from the mouse.

Step 2: Access Screws

On this particular model there are four screws which hold the mouse body together. These screws are located underneath the slide pads on the underside of the mouse. To remove the slide pads, gently pry the edge of the pad up with a small flat head screwdriver and peel it off. They are held in place with some sort of adhesive.

Step 3: Remove Screws

Remove the four screws with a small philips head screw driver.

Step 4: Open Her Up

At this point the top cover should lift off, revealing the mouse's innards.

Step 5: Locate the Click Mechanism That Is Causing the Problem (usually Left Click)

Depending on the mouse, there can be one, or several click mechanisms. This particular mouse has 6, with the left and right click being the main mechanism. The left click is the one causing me problems, and is likely the one you are looking for also. Locate this mechanism so we can continue the repair.

Before you proceed, be sure to notice the very tiny white button located on the top cover. This will fall loose when the cover is removed, and you will want to be sure you retain this piece to be reinstalled later.

Step 6: Open the Mechanism Box

The small rectangular box, contains the part we need access to in order to complete the repair.
To open the cover, use a small flat head screwdriver to gently pry the box cover away from the latch. This will allow the cover to lift slightly until you can do the same to the backside. Be careful not to pry too far or hard as it could damage the cover. The first time I performed this repair, I damaged the cover on mine, but thankfully it still stays in place, so there was no real harm done.

Be sure to retain the small white button to reinstall later.

Step 7: Locate, Remove, and Retension the Spring

This is the key to the repair. You must remove the very tiny copper tension spring from inside the click mechanism.

After you have removed this part, make sure the small tab has a decent curve to it. You can see in the picture how I use the screw driver to bend the curve while holding it down with my finger.

Then bend the tab up, so there will be more tension on it after it is reinstalled. You can see the before and after pictures showing how this will look.

Step 8: Reinstall Tension Spring

This is where the patience comes into play.  This is probably the most tedious and time consuming part of the repair.
To reinstall the tension spring, first attach it to the small hook at the front of the mechanism, as shown in the picture. Then use the flat head screwdriver to push the curved tab into place while keeping the rear of the spring under the small arm at the rear of the mechanism. The second picture shows what it should look like after being reinstalled. Notice the arrows pointing to the spots that need the most attention. You want all three to be correct or the mechanism will not operate properly. 

Step 9: Reassemble the Click Mechanism and Test

Next, you will need to reassemble the click mechanism. First reinstall the tiny white button into the mechanism cover (you did remember to find and set aside the tiny button right?).  The easiest way to do this is by dropping or placing it into the cover with a pair of tweezers. With one hand, pick up the cover  while keeping it upside down so the button stays in place. With the other hand, pick up the mouse body, turn it upside down, and push the cover back into place. Doing it this way will insure that the tiny white button stays in place while the mechanism is put back together.

At this point, before reassembling the mouse, set it down on the table, and give the tiny white button a few test clicks. You should notice that it is making a crisp click sound when pressed, and that it now springs back with more force than it did before. If you are not hearing and feeling a difference, you may need to open the mechanism back up and try retentioning the spring again.

If all seems well, than go ahead and put the mouse top back in place, reinstall the 4 main screws, and put the slide pads back in place. If there is not enough adhesive left to keep the slide pads on, you can add some more. Regular elmers glue stick has worked for me, or a dab of superglue would certainly do the trick.

Thanks for reading. I hope you now have a mouse that clicks properly.

81 People Made This Project!

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369 Comments

4
dmiranda8
dmiranda8

7 years ago

I cant believe it worked. After some yelling and time I finally got the damn copper piece into place. THANKS!

5
csheng1
csheng1

7 years ago on Introduction

Hi, thank you very much for the great tutorial - I've tried it and my mouse is working fine. May I suggest that for step 8: Reinstall tension spring, you (1) place the curved tab (which is in the middle of the spring) at an angle on the tiny ledge of the metal piece on the mechanism first, then (2) hook the spring onto the front part of the mechanism, before finally (3) sliding the spring beneath the rear part of the mechanism?

I did not have much luck with the original action series of 2-1-3 until I tried 1-2-3 and the whole spring just slid into place while pivoting on the middle curved tab.

Hope this helps. And once again, thank you!

0
achhitnamgfi682731
achhitnamgfi682731

2 days ago

I tried this and ended up butchering the spring so bad it was unusable. It's far easier to just grab a dead mouse and soldering iron and harvest a switch and replace it. It's super easy to desolder and resolder a relatively large component like this. Almost all mice use the exact same switches.

0
squaid.ink
squaid.ink

17 days ago on Introduction

Thanks for the instructions! Also the video in the comment helped a bunch. A lot of people thought it was difficult but I can put you other people at ease who have worked a bit with mice before and other electronics. It's an easy 10 min fix if you've done jobs as such before.

0
minoABCD
minoABCD

21 days ago

It worked!! Thanks for extremely detailed instructions!!

0
Tagra
Tagra

5 weeks ago

I didn't dare take out the copper piece out of my freshly bought mouse that started doubleclicking (barely 6 months old and this stuff happens? My previous one lasted a darn decade for christ's sake) but taking off the casing from the switch was thankfully easy after jamming a needle into the tiny crevice.
As expected the curved tension part didn't look damaged so I only gently nudged at the end of it with a needle hoping for a miracle, which somehow worked. I suspect it had something to do with oxidation rather than the nudging, and knowing my luck the problem will return eventually.
I've no idea if the copper piece comes off easily on Logitech mice, but on mine (european brand) it seemed well seated in place and flimsy enough that I feared bending it and left it alone for that reason.
Overall this is NOT an easy fix. The pieces are very fragile and small, you need tools and good lighting and ideally a magnifying glass because separating the two parts without seeing the minuscule crevice is hardly enjoyable.
Oh and curse the mice manufacturers to hell and beyond for placing the screws underneath the teflon. Mine got all mangled after prying it off and doesn't feel the same afterwards.

0
xdjav22
xdjav22

8 weeks ago

After what felt like years of battling the copper clip, I'm proud to say my left click is finally working again!

1
GPraz
GPraz

2 months ago

I found this guide by miracle and decided to try to fix my Cougar 250M. I don't have spare money to buy a new mouse. OMG it works thanks. I overdid the tension part and now my left click is very heavy but no more mis-click. Not bad for cheap mouse like mine

1
michelcabral
michelcabral

Tip 2 months ago

Thank you very much for the instructions! It worked perfectly!
I've also found the following YT video very helpful:
And on this site you can check whether your mouse is cursed by the "fast double click" plague: https://codepen.io/blink172/pen/vERyxK

0
GregsPetRock
GregsPetRock

3 months ago

Tried this with my Logitech m90 and it worked like a charm! Thanks a lot!

0
PetrusAtreides
PetrusAtreides

3 months ago

I've done these steps on my Logitech G300 and G500s mice. Extended their usefullness quite a bit, definitely.

0
charlesrievone
charlesrievone

4 months ago

Worked quite well for my Logitech G600. Thanks!

0
joecherwinski
joecherwinski

7 months ago

tedious!! was able to do a more reverse entry with the spring on the last part, definitely need patience, but now know how to do it, had to take the right click assembly apart to see how it should look. Did this on a logitech g400s (purchased new at 48$ 7 years ago, people trying to sell refurbished ones for twice that now.)

0
tomsterauds
tomsterauds

8 months ago

I didnt bend tension spring, but change it from left mouse button to right and right to left. It fixed my problem. Tnx for guide.

0
mousalou.m
mousalou.m

9 months ago

I just signed up to this site to tell you this:
You're a good man, thank you!

I have a Genius netscroll 120 mouse and I just fixed it with satisfaction. The only thing different was that the copper piece of my mouse was upside down relative to yours, so I had to straighten the curve instead of bending it. cheers

0
Dioggu
Dioggu

9 months ago

Thank you for the guide.
Just followed the steps and managed to fix the double-clicking.
The click is also softer now but it definitely doesn't click.

0
m.sabouri92
m.sabouri92

10 months ago

You just saved me from buying a new mouse, thank you so much!!!

0
GreekTech
GreekTech

10 months ago

Well it took time (the part t reinput that coper) but it saved me 50 bucks. So thank you for the help!!

0
jollyjoyjoy
jollyjoyjoy

10 months ago

Thanks for the tutorial! I actually broke the copper piece trying to fit it in. Luckily, I had another mouse that had the same exact problem. So I just took the right mouse button's copper piece from that one and placed it into the left mouse button of the other. Pity I decided to do this tutorial AFTER ordering 2 more mouse to replace my faulty device. :/

0
nxqs
nxqs

10 months ago

Thx for the guide, it worked perfectly!