Repair Mouse With Double Click Problem

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Introduction: Repair Mouse With Double Click Problem

I have a Logitech wireless laser mouse and after a year or so of use, the left click button would double click every time I tried to single click something. As can be imagined, this gets frustrating very fast. So, being the tinkerer that I am, I decided to open her up and see if it could be repaired. Sure enough, It's a pretty simple fix, if you have some common tools and a teaspoon (edit:a tablespoon) of patience. There are some very small parts involved, so you will want to make sure you ware working in a well lit, clean environment so that any parts that are dropped can be easily found. I have now performed this fix for the third time and decided to take pictures this time to share with others who may find this useful. Each time the repair lasts about 6 months to a year before needing to be redone. I imagine at some point the piece causing the problem will break, at which time the mouse will need to be replaced (unless you're determined enough to try and source parts). Good luck with your repair, I hope this helps.

EDIT: There are quite a few comments about the difficulty of step 8. I would advise that you read through some of the comments for various approaches to completing that part of the repair.

Step 1: Remove Batteries

If you are working on a wireless mouse, you will want to first open the battery cover, and remove the batteries from the mouse.

Step 2: Access Screws

On this particular model there are four screws which hold the mouse body together. These screws are located underneath the slide pads on the underside of the mouse. To remove the slide pads, gently pry the edge of the pad up with a small flat head screwdriver and peel it off. They are held in place with some sort of adhesive.

Step 3: Remove Screws

Remove the four screws with a small philips head screw driver.

Step 4: Open Her Up

At this point the top cover should lift off, revealing the mouse's innards.

Step 5: Locate the Click Mechanism That Is Causing the Problem (usually Left Click)

Depending on the mouse, there can be one, or several click mechanisms. This particular mouse has 6, with the left and right click being the main mechanism. The left click is the one causing me problems, and is likely the one you are looking for also. Locate this mechanism so we can continue the repair.

Before you proceed, be sure to notice the very tiny white button located on the top cover. This will fall loose when the cover is removed, and you will want to be sure you retain this piece to be reinstalled later.

Step 6: Open the Mechanism Box

The small rectangular box, contains the part we need access to in order to complete the repair.
To open the cover, use a small flat head screwdriver to gently pry the box cover away from the latch. This will allow the cover to lift slightly until you can do the same to the backside. Be careful not to pry too far or hard as it could damage the cover. The first time I performed this repair, I damaged the cover on mine, but thankfully it still stays in place, so there was no real harm done.

Be sure to retain the small white button to reinstall later.

Step 7: Locate, Remove, and Retension the Spring

This is the key to the repair. You must remove the very tiny copper tension spring from inside the click mechanism.

After you have removed this part, make sure the small tab has a decent curve to it. You can see in the picture how I use the screw driver to bend the curve while holding it down with my finger.

Then bend the tab up, so there will be more tension on it after it is reinstalled. You can see the before and after pictures showing how this will look.

Step 8: Reinstall Tension Spring

This is where the patience comes into play.  This is probably the most tedious and time consuming part of the repair.
To reinstall the tension spring, first attach it to the small hook at the front of the mechanism, as shown in the picture. Then use the flat head screwdriver to push the curved tab into place while keeping the rear of the spring under the small arm at the rear of the mechanism. The second picture shows what it should look like after being reinstalled. Notice the arrows pointing to the spots that need the most attention. You want all three to be correct or the mechanism will not operate properly. 

Step 9: Reassemble the Click Mechanism and Test

Next, you will need to reassemble the click mechanism. First reinstall the tiny white button into the mechanism cover (you did remember to find and set aside the tiny button right?).  The easiest way to do this is by dropping or placing it into the cover with a pair of tweezers. With one hand, pick up the cover  while keeping it upside down so the button stays in place. With the other hand, pick up the mouse body, turn it upside down, and push the cover back into place. Doing it this way will insure that the tiny white button stays in place while the mechanism is put back together.

At this point, before reassembling the mouse, set it down on the table, and give the tiny white button a few test clicks. You should notice that it is making a crisp click sound when pressed, and that it now springs back with more force than it did before. If you are not hearing and feeling a difference, you may need to open the mechanism back up and try retentioning the spring again.

If all seems well, than go ahead and put the mouse top back in place, reinstall the 4 main screws, and put the slide pads back in place. If there is not enough adhesive left to keep the slide pads on, you can add some more. Regular elmers glue stick has worked for me, or a dab of superglue would certainly do the trick.

Thanks for reading. I hope you now have a mouse that clicks properly.

88 People Made This Project!

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381 Comments

0
csheng1
csheng1

8 years ago on Introduction

Hi, thank you very much for the great tutorial - I've tried it and my mouse is working fine. May I suggest that for step 8: Reinstall tension spring, you (1) place the curved tab (which is in the middle of the spring) at an angle on the tiny ledge of the metal piece on the mechanism first, then (2) hook the spring onto the front part of the mechanism, before finally (3) sliding the spring beneath the rear part of the mechanism?

I did not have much luck with the original action series of 2-1-3 until I tried 1-2-3 and the whole spring just slid into place while pivoting on the middle curved tab.

Hope this helps. And once again, thank you!

0
thegreatestnames
thegreatestnames

Reply 1 year ago

Did this one. My mouse doesn't make a click noise anymore, but it still seems to click, and only once now. Don't know if it's taking more pressure for me to click or not. Don't like it, but it works.

0
dmiranda8
dmiranda8

8 years ago

I cant believe it worked. After some yelling and time I finally got the damn copper piece into place. THANKS!

0
leroyklotz
leroyklotz

Question 27 days ago

So, I just threw away my mouse out of sheer frustration after trying to fix this issue for about 4 hours consecutively.
Good news is that I'm now a professional at taking it apart and putting it back together. I think I've done so about 20 times.
Bad news is that it just simply does not work. After reassembling the click mechanism it is not possible to click the white button. There is no sound, 0. So I've done it wrong, clearly. I take it back apart and try to put it together in a different way. Again, no sound, 0.

I'm sure the issue is the spring, the most frustrating thing about this whole exercise is that it is not possible to see. I can not, for the life of me, determine how the middle spring is supposed to fit back in. What is it supposed to rest on? On the top? On the bottom? In the middle?

Even when I look at your picture, downloaded and fully zoomed in, the most crucial part is hidden behind another part of the spring. You should really, REALLY, put a more detailed picture of that specific part on the guide. And maybe also explain in words WHERE the middle part is supposed to rest on.

I'm very sad to say that after the 20th attempt the spring broke off and the mouse was therefore done. I'd expect not to be the first one to run into this exact issue because it's absolutely impossible to see where to put it. You just have to guess. In any case, I've taken the time to write this out and hopefully prevent other people from destroying their mouse and throwing away 100 euro's in the process.

0
AiiH
AiiH

6 months ago

Thank you so much, I was having trouble finding a solution to this problem and days/weeks went by with all the same answers. I had to go through a few different hoops since my Logitech mouse had a few things in the way but I ultimately came out on top because of this! Thank you so very much :)!

0
16934
16934

9 months ago

I have been experiencing weird double click issues, but did not want to go into disassembling of the mouse like described here, especially when the double click was not recorded by any of the website tools posted here.
Here is my solution:
download and run Mouse Fix:
https://danieljackson.co.uk/fun/old/

It will solve the HW issue by removing the second click by its clever inner workings.

0
tsousa0
tsousa0

1 year ago

Thank you for the tutorial. I've tried it but without success - the problem remained. However, I was able to "fix" the issue via software, in Mouse Properties, by increasing double-click speed (!)

0
pofox
pofox

Tip 1 year ago

I just repaired my 9 year old Logitech MX Professional mouse with the help of this guide, thanks! I will add some tips:

When you pop off the cover of the switch, take a few close up photos of the mechanism for reference so you know how its meant to look when you reassemble it back again. Use macro if you can. The photos really saved me.

Reshaping the copper piece is very fiddly and getting the shape right is also challenging. I'd say instead of taking it out of the braces, try to reshape it in place because trying to hook it back in is hard. Go in sideways with a jewellers screw driver or toothpick to reshape the curved flange so it butts up taut against the braces. The curved flange is meant to push tightly up against the brace to provide the force behind the clickiness.

Also I accidentally bent the main frame and I had to unbend it, but end result was a slight bend, which actually was what was needed to stiffen the whole thing and now it is clicking nice and crisp.

Note: I had actually ordered a replacement switch (as one commenter recommended). But my mouse was designed in a way where it would be very complicated to get to the underside of the board to unsolder the old switch and resolder a new one. So check with your mouse before deciding which way to go.

0
matejhilmer
matejhilmer

1 year ago

Thanks! It took about 15 minutes and my M705 is good for another set of batteries (about 5 years hehe)

0
matejhilmer
matejhilmer

Tip 1 year ago

Put some isopropyl alcohol around the slide pads to peel them off easily without damage. The adhesive will regain stickiness after alcohol dries off. You can use tweezers to "pick up" a drop of alcohol.

0
Michae89
Michae89

1 year ago

Thanks! It work wonders, although I really run out of patience once or twice during the reassembly of the tension spring. Mouse works quite good now, and outside the mangled slide pads it didn't suffer much.

0
williamsharkey
williamsharkey

3 years ago

Thanks, this worked for fixing a logitech m570 wireless thumb ball mouse.

I did not take the copper thing off. I used a toothpick soaked in rubbing alcohol to clean where the copper switch touches. Only took a few minutes.

I wanted to be sure that the problem was fixed, so I made a web page that counted mouse clicks.

Before fixing it, when I pressed the left button down, it would register about 1 - 4 clicks. Sometimes it would not click at all. After, it only registered one click. I hope this page is handy for others who want to test their mouse: williamsharkey.com/mouse

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0
ash.renji
ash.renji

Reply 1 year ago

nice.. :)

0
JanH172
JanH172

Reply 3 years ago

Thank you, very usefull :)

0
ash.renji
ash.renji

1 year ago

its tricky, but its works!!!!! thanks alot guys

0
tuxshake
tuxshake

Tip 1 year ago

Sometimes you don't have to take out the copper piece ...
Just open the switch and use a contact cleaner spray first !!
Remove the spring only if you have no choice.

kontakt60-z.jpg
0
achhitnamgfi682731
achhitnamgfi682731

1 year ago

I tried this and ended up butchering the spring so bad it was unusable. It's far easier to just grab a dead mouse and soldering iron and harvest a switch and replace it. It's super easy to desolder and resolder a relatively large component like this. Almost all mice use the exact same switches.

0
squaid.ink
squaid.ink

1 year ago on Introduction

Thanks for the instructions! Also the video in the comment helped a bunch. A lot of people thought it was difficult but I can put you other people at ease who have worked a bit with mice before and other electronics. It's an easy 10 min fix if you've done jobs as such before.

0
minoABCD
minoABCD

1 year ago

It worked!! Thanks for extremely detailed instructions!!

0
Tagra
Tagra

1 year ago

I didn't dare take out the copper piece out of my freshly bought mouse that started doubleclicking (barely 6 months old and this stuff happens? My previous one lasted a darn decade for christ's sake) but taking off the casing from the switch was thankfully easy after jamming a needle into the tiny crevice.
As expected the curved tension part didn't look damaged so I only gently nudged at the end of it with a needle hoping for a miracle, which somehow worked. I suspect it had something to do with oxidation rather than the nudging, and knowing my luck the problem will return eventually.
I've no idea if the copper piece comes off easily on Logitech mice, but on mine (european brand) it seemed well seated in place and flimsy enough that I feared bending it and left it alone for that reason.
Overall this is NOT an easy fix. The pieces are very fragile and small, you need tools and good lighting and ideally a magnifying glass because separating the two parts without seeing the minuscule crevice is hardly enjoyable.
Oh and curse the mice manufacturers to hell and beyond for placing the screws underneath the teflon. Mine got all mangled after prying it off and doesn't feel the same afterwards.