Rubber Trailer Fenders

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Introduction: Rubber Trailer Fenders

About: Retired Tool Maker ( 1980 ) Retired Mechanical Engineer ( 2009 ) Full time Tinkerer

I have this little trailer that didn't come with any fenders. I thought " No big deal ". Then I drove it in the rail. The tires threw mud all over the back of my truck. Now I could have gone and bought some tin or plastic fenders for boat trailers, but after a while they seem to be bent or broken. So I thought, what can't break or rust and always springs back? Old truck tires! So I found a nice tire in the "Magic Woods" and brought it home. I used some chalk to lay it out, first in two haves and then just enough rim to look nice on the outside and space for mounting holes on the inside. Then a little radius on the sharp corners so no one cuts themselves. I used a saber saw to cut through the rubber and spur drills for wood cut the rubber nicely.

Step 1: Mounting Bolts and Washers

To hold the rubber fenders to my trailer I used three bolts with regular washers and 2" diameter plywood washers. Rubber has a way of working around things so I thought the plywood washers would hold. Well they have held for over 20 years.

Step 2: Still No Dents or Cracks!

So these rubber fenders have worked fine.

The first time a friend help me push the trailer around the yard he was afraid the bearings were frozen! He shouted " Stop! Stop! The tires aren't turning! " Ha Ha.

Hope you can use this idea.

Good luck, Carl.

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    12 Discussions

    0
    LauriBikes
    LauriBikes

    3 months ago on Step 1

    You should use stainless nuts, bolts and washers at fenders because they are very likely to corrode and rust. In my opinion recommended. Of course you cab remove nuts with drill or angle grinder, but it's quite ruff method. Usable nevertheless. Comment on picture 1

    0
    carl5blum
    carl5blum

    Reply 3 months ago

    Stainless is painless! But rusting may be an advantage, rusted bolts don't vibrate loose??

    0
    LauriBikes
    LauriBikes

    Reply 3 months ago

    😃 yes they keep on a long time.😃

    0
    LauriBikes
    LauriBikes

    3 months ago on Step 2

    How much do fenders weight?

    I thought about plate metal fenders from old barrel, but discarded the idea at that time, because of the weight limit. Bicycle trailer was at all 50 kg at that time. Nowadays it's the manufacturers limit. I assembled trailer myself so i decide the limit. Pulled 180 cm cable roll with it. I don't have fenders in trailer, only short mud plates at back. Made of truck or car mudplate.

    1
    carl5blum
    carl5blum

    Reply 3 months ago

    Hello Lauri: I don't have the trailer any longer, but can make a guess. The whole tire might have weighed 50#, but after cutting off the bead and splitting in half, each fender might have been 18#. Depending on your trailer tire you might be able to start with a smaller tire for the fender. Go by a tire shop and ask to look at their old tires to find a good fit. Best wishes, Carl.

    0
    LauriBikes
    LauriBikes

    Reply 3 months ago

    Thankyou. Keep that in mind. I just took old tires to recycling center. I took the spikes out first, probably they take them anyway. It was car tire, the fender needs maybe bigger tires. They could support load somewhat too. Especially loose cargo like pile of woods. Maybe wood needs a special support stand anyway...

    0
    MarkM750
    MarkM750

    1 year ago

    Great idea! I am going to give it a try and take some pictures... i was going to try and pull it off with wood, however I like tire better for various reasons. I was shopping and trailer fenders can be pricey or just super cheap crappy from China. It is difficult to cut a steel belted radial tire so that will probably be the biggest challenge. I have a new angle grinder so I should be OK. I'll check out some "truck tire dealers" tomorrow and look for a good size in the used/junk pile... My tires are short 10" however wide...

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    1
    carl5blum
    carl5blum

    Reply 1 year ago

    Hello Mark:
    I found my fender tire dumped in the woods. If you have a Drag Strip in your area they may have a tire for you. Their tires are usually quite wide and they don't keep them long. I use a fine toothed metal blade in my saber saw and had no problems with the steel plies. They are not hard to cut with the support from the rubber around them. It is similar to a tip on cutting sheet metal with a hack saw: Sandwich the metal between two sheets of plywood. The wood controls the rate of cut so the teeth can cut the steel with out snagging.
    Good luck, Carl.

    0
    charlessenf-gm
    charlessenf-gm

    3 years ago

    Great idea. Next time, look at Stainless Steel FENDER WASHERS (and bolts and nuts in SS)

    0
    carl5blum
    carl5blum

    Reply 3 years ago

    Hello Charlessenf-gm:

    Stainless is Painless! The little trailer has been sold to a friend and I hope he has it for many more years.

    Thanks, Carl.

    0
    Blackcloud161
    Blackcloud161

    4 years ago

    I LOVE it!!!

    So kool and a PERFECT use for an old tire!!