Slatted Console Table

5,220

105

16

Introduction: Slatted Console Table

About: Educated as an architect. Employed as a builder. Always a maker. https://www.instagram.com/muldoon_made/

This slatted console table take inspiration from our 100+ year old house and from the "Vedima Console" by Lulu and Georgia.

Supplies:

Materials

  • White Oak
  • 2" screws
  • Finish - I used water based polyurethane

Tools

  • Table Saw
  • Jig Saw
  • Biscuit Joiner
  • Router w/ 1/4" round over
  • Drill - with a few different sized bits
  • Drill Press w/ Plug hole bit
  • Orbital Sander

Step 1: The Slats

  • Cut the slats to the desired width. Mine are 1" wide
  • Use a router table to make a round over edge to the slats. I used 1/4"
  • Sand smooth

Step 2: The Shelves - Assembly

  • The white oak that I purchased was already planed and had straight edges.
  • I lined up the boards to find the best matches for each.
  • I used a biscuit joiner to keep the shelves plane.
  • I made (3) 14" x 64" shelves and sanded them to remove marks and glue.

Step 3: The Shelves - Round Ends

  • Mark out a 7" radius circle at the ends of the boards
  • Cut just outside of the line with the jog saw
  • I made a circle cutting template with spare plywood to attach to the router. Using a trim bit, I smoothed out the edges to meet the line.

Step 4: The Shelves - Cut Notches

  • I made a template out of 1/4" plywood with the size and spacing of my slats.
  • Transfer the pattern onto the boards
  • Drill corners to fit the round over edges of your slats
  • Cut the straight edges with the jig saw
  • I used an offcut of the slats to ensure a good fit.

Step 5: Console - Assembly

  • I made a spacer jig out of mdf and 2x4s to establish the heights of my shelves.
  • Center the shelves and begin laying the slats into the notches
  • I left the slats long on one end. They will be cut and sanded flush at the end.

Step 6: Console - Attachments

  • Drill pilot holes for screw attachments
  • Drill an oversized hole to recess the screw about 1/2 way through the slat
  • Install screw
  • Cut plugs the same size as the oversized hole
  • Insert plugs into the screw holes and sand flush

Step 7: Console - Base

  • Leave 4 slats that are directly across from one another for the legs
  • Stop the round over where it leaves enough room for the space beneath the bottom shelf to attach flush to another piece.
  • Install these longer pieces in the designated notches
  • Install a piece of wood to connect the front and back legs
  • Install another piece of wood horizontally to connect the left and right bases

Step 8: Finish Console

  • Sand smooth to a fine grit
  • Apply finish
  • Style and enjoy!

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    16 Comments

    0
    dkistner
    dkistner

    14 days ago

    So lovely!

    0
    Mike Muldoon
    Mike Muldoon

    Reply 17 hours ago

    Thank you!

    0
    wyldemedia
    wyldemedia

    12 days ago

    Love it. Thanks for the effective step by step tips on doing the round ends and slots. Excellent work on the slots and whole piece looks great in positon. The choice of wood adds value to a piece that you can keep for many years. Bravo

    0
    Mike Muldoon
    Mike Muldoon

    Reply 17 hours ago

    Thank you! I am very happy with it.

    0
    cirena
    cirena

    2 days ago

    Wow! Slots on round edges, with hand tools! Thank you!
    I do like it more than the original "VEDIMA CONSOLE TABLE", because of flush look of the edjes.

    0
    Mike Muldoon
    Mike Muldoon

    Reply 17 hours ago

    Thank you! The flush look was a must for me.

    1
    JoopB1
    JoopB1

    17 days ago

    very nice!! voted!

    0
    snowf7
    snowf7

    Reply 14 days ago

    How were you able to vote?

    0
    Mike Muldoon
    Mike Muldoon

    Reply 15 days ago

    Thank you, I appreciate it!

    1
    dv3law
    dv3law

    14 days ago

    I am curious why you did not use glue in the joints for the slats, nor on the plugs covering the screws. I would think that would add materially to the strength of the joints, and I have always glued in wood plugs. I do really like this project and it absolutely complements your home. Thanks for sharing it.

    2
    Mike Muldoon
    Mike Muldoon

    Reply 14 days ago

    I guess my thought process at the time was that in the event that I would have to adjust or shift the slats, I didn't want to have to sand down glue smudges on every slat. In hindsight, the dry fit went very well and I should have applied glue at that point.

    Adding glue would absolutely strengthen this assembly. Luckily for me, the length and amount of screws keep this very strong. Thanks for your input!

    3
    Stevens Workshop
    Stevens Workshop

    19 days ago

    Lovely piece and fits perfectly in the house.
    I also love the fact that it was all done with 'simple' tools rather than just dropping the wood onto a CNC and hitting go. No shade on CNC as I would love to have one.

    1
    Mike Muldoon
    Mike Muldoon

    Reply 15 days ago

    Thank you! a CNC certainly would've made those notches faster than I did.

    1
    Stevens Workshop
    Stevens Workshop

    Reply 15 days ago

    Yes, but would you have got the satifaction

    1
    Maladiun57
    Maladiun57

    16 days ago

    I had the same thoughts- why not use CNC but also love the handmade (sort of!) Shows why bespoke furniture is expensive but also why things are so cheap with automation now that decorating becomes 'disposable'. Craftsmen and artisans cant compete...

    1
    Mike Muldoon
    Mike Muldoon

    Reply 15 days ago

    I guess we are all subject to our limitations. No CNC here, so I need to design and build with the tools/skills that I know I have access to. That's also the beauty of making things for your own home ... no one to compete with.