Stars Taken From Above

Introduction: Stars Taken From Above

About: I am an advid writer, reader, scrapbook-er, and crafter!

Have you ever pondered on if you could possibly steal away a few hundred stars? Just some treasures, to keep for yourself?

While maybe the possibility of dragging behind you flaming fire balls seems pretty dim, you can still capture the dazzling beauty in your own creative way!

You'll learn how to discover, decorate, make, fold, and store a few of these fascinating gifts, and keep them with you forever.

Supplies

♡ Normal printer paper (or, if preferred, origami paper, hand-made paper, colored paper, pressed paper, stamped paper, etc.!)

♡ A scissor

♡ A ruler

♡ A willing hand

Step 1: Cutting the Size

First, we'll have to use our printer paper to cut out a well enough sized strip to make our first star.

The strip should be

♡ about 27 cm. long and

♡ about 1 cm in width.

These are the measurements to make a regular sized star.

Later, you can mess with the width and length to create tiny, fat, long, or skinny stars!

But it is important to master the basic star first, so we'll stick to these measurements.

Step 2: A Knot a Star

Next step is to make a knot!

Yes, we'll need to start our star somewhere, and a knot is a great beginning.

Making a knot with paper seems hard, and it takes practice; but once you've got the knot, the rest will literally wind up!

At first, your paper might rip, and you might need to start over. However, the core of the star is the knot, and you must not let frustration overcome you.

To make a paper knot, slowly grab the top, your first finger at the very top edge, and your second finger down enough to tie the two ends together. The video will give you the basic move instantly.

Make sure to perfect the knot at the end. The tighter and neater the knot, the tighter and neater the star!

Step 3: Folding Around

Now, it's time to fold around!

Take a look at your knot. It should resemble a sort of crooked pentagon. The more you practice, the better your knot will look. Again, make sure your knot is done tight so that it doesn't fall apart.

The first step is to bend the excess paper so that you only have a clean knot. Then, your job is to fold and fold around the base to make the sides of a pentagon.

This will take practice too, but if you have a clear knot, you should be able to trace the sides neatly.

It may be hard to know in which direction, but by your second star the sides should seem conceivable enough for a quick fold. You want to fold puffly, or in a puffy, airy way, because the sides are supposed to be squishy and bendable for the next step!

When you run out of paper to fold, neatly tuck the end into the rest, and voila! A pentagon!

If you realize your strip is too thin, you can always re-do to a brand new, hard strip, and try the steps again, if your strip shows signs of creases or worn trials.

The two videos above will guide you through the big steps!

Step 4: Puffing and Puffing and Creasing

Now, if you DID correctly make a puffy pentagon, it's time for the magic!!

All we're going to do is the fun part: creasing!! We're just going to invert the sides, and there you go! A paper star!

Step 5: DECORATE!!

Listen, it's tricky to get a star to look like, well, a star, at first.

Actually, you probably won't get it even at second!

But the more you practice, the quicker your fingers get, and the better your stars get.

You can make a lot of stars with one sheet of paper, and you can use other cutting tools instead of scissors for faster makings.

Try experimenting with different colors and materials and papers!! And sizes, too! Stars come in all designs!

And make sure, in the end, to celebrate with a jar's worth of stars.

Mason Jar Speed Challenge

Participated in the
Mason Jar Speed Challenge

Be the First to Share

    Recommendations

    • Micro:bit Contest

      Micro:bit Contest
    • Halloween Contest

      Halloween Contest
    • Space Contest

      Space Contest

    2 Comments

    0
    Penolopy Bulnick
    Penolopy Bulnick

    1 year ago

    Thanks for sharing! If you have any more photos of how to make these, they would be great to see :)

    0
    danadanadana
    danadanadana

    Reply 1 year ago

    They're really cool to display, and they're not too hard to make, either. It just takes practice. I'll make another instructable with more demonstrations and techniques! You can twist the paper at the ends, too, and make giant stars as well. The best are the colored ones, but the white are more authentic!