Sunny Concrete Pot

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Introduction: Sunny Concrete Pot

About: I’m designer, passionate about creating and collaborating developing my creativity in solutions that can serve the maker community.

Inspired by nature and committed to create a succulent pot, I designed the "Sunny Concrete Pot". A sunny day in Sunnyvale in Sunny California I started looking to my desk when the main inspiration seeing nature made it create a minimalist look, capable of adapting to any environment.

Step 1: Sketched Concepts

A simple and organic form combined with the nature of the concrete material result in Sunny concept pot. Once the concept was sketched I began to plan how to build my mold by making some sketches of the idea. I decided to create the mold in 3 parts to make the demoulding of the piece easier.

In this stage I decided that the center piece of the mold will be in a flexible material to remove the center without damaging the piece. Investigating I found the Alginate as an easy and quick to use material for my center mold.

Step 2: Creating 3d Models

In this stage I used Autodesk Inventor to create the 3d models and to visualize that everything will assemble well.

Step 3: 3d Printing Molds

I used 3d printing to create some parts of the mold. This helped create some improvements in the final mold.

Step 4: Assembly 3d Printing Mold to Create Alginate Mold

Once that I printed the two parts of the exterior mold and the inner part of the mold I assemble the 3 pieces of the mold, press them with tweezers on the edges of the mold and began to prepare the alginate powder with water.

I used 3 full cups of alginate powder mixed with 2 cups of water and then I mixed. It is necessary to mix the material quickly and empty the mold as it hardens very quickly.

Step 5: Pour Concrete in Mold

With the 3 parts of the mold ready to start preparing the concrete mix. I reassembled the final mold pieces and started pouring the concrete from the top.

Step 6: Concrete Drying

I left the mold with concrete for 24 hours drying. After that time I removed half of the outer mold. Leaving for 12 hours more to dry the concrete, to ensure that the piece was solid.

Step 7: Complete Demold

I removed the last 2 pieces of the mold. I applied concrete sealant to make the pot waterproof.

Step 8: Sunny Ready to Use

Finally I chose a combination of succulents of different textures and colors to generate an harmony with neutral color of the concrete.

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    8 Discussions

    0
    Rhino12343
    Rhino12343

    Question 1 year ago

    I'm not sure what I missed, what did you use the alginate for?
    I see a step referencing its use but not sure what it was used for haha.

    0
    vassa2187
    vassa2187

    Answer 1 year ago

    I made the internal part of the mold with alginate to be able to unmold because the internal part of the pot has the same shape has the external part, I had to use a flexible core, and the alginate has this properties. To make the alginate core I started 3d printing the positive and the external molds to assembly the 3 parts. Once assembled, I prepared 3 cups of alginate with 3 cups of water and mixing everything quickly. Then I poured over the inner part filling up the mark of the second level of the circle. In less than 10 minutes the alginate was ready to use as internal core. Once I got the positive off the mold, the last step was removing the alginate part and the 3d printed pot, then reassemble the alginate mold with the two outer parts of the mold, aligning the circle of the second level so the alginate is in place. Finally, to pour the concrete you have to turn the whole assembly up side down.

    IMG_4974.jpgAlginate.jpgpieces.jpg
    0
    Rhino12343
    Rhino12343

    Reply 1 year ago

    aaahhhh, I understand now thanks.
    Does the core have to be flexible though?
    I was wondering if you couldn't make the core with the 3d print and put some clingfilm / shrink wrap around the internal so it has a smooth extraction?
    Equally could you have put a coat of sealant that the concrete wouldn't stick to on the core?
    Just curious about how else this could be done.
    thanks for clarifying for me and I really like this idea, I might give it a go at some point.

    0
    Davilyn2
    Davilyn2

    1 year ago

    Although I have no desire to get a 3-D printer, still, I like to see how they work, what people do with them; and to follow the development of the 3-D printer concept in general. Very nice tutorial, you made it easy to understand....and of course, a Lovely pot.

    0
    Marcells44.
    Marcells44.

    Reply 1 year ago

    I was very much like you until weeks ago when I asked a friend to print parts for a ventilation system. Printing figurines or stuff like that was of no use for me, but when I discovered the possibility to do mechanical stuff, and molding like this instructable, I finally dove into the world of 3D printing... and I'm waiting for my first one :D

    0
    Davilyn2
    Davilyn2

    Reply 1 year ago

    You certainly seem to have a talent for it. May you have endless Inspiration in your new focus.

    0
    audreyobscura
    audreyobscura

    1 year ago

    Awesome design and casting tips! Thank you so much for sharing!

    0
    vassa2187
    vassa2187

    Reply 1 year ago

    It is a pleasure to share with the community, thank you. I’m glad you liked it!