"TANGO" THE PLYWOOD AUTOMATA

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Introduction: "TANGO" THE PLYWOOD AUTOMATA

About: I am engineer & hobbyist.

Surely you have ever heard the word "Automaton" or "Automata"..

According to Wikipedia “Automata is a relatively self-operating machine, or a machine or control mechanism designed to automatically follow a predetermined sequence of operations, or respond to predetermined instructions. Some automata, such as bellstrikers in mechanical clocks, are designed to give the illusion to the casual observer that they are operating under their own power. Since long ago, the term is commonly associated with automated puppets that resemble moving humans or animals, built to impress and / or to entertain people ”.

But maybe since we live in an age of so much electronics you may not have seen some of the mechanical wonders created like this:

https://www.youtube.com/user/CabaretMechTheatre/v...

If you are interested in learning more about the history of automata, you can see the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automaton

In this tutorial I explains how to do an automata easily and cheaply.

Let's start!

PS1: My special consideration to all the people who are suffering from COVID-19. My great recognition to the scientists who have created the vaccines, with which we hope this scourge of humanity will end.

PS2: English is not my native language. My apologies for mistakes in writing.

Supplies

- Plywood wooden 12 mm (for support and base).

- Plywood wooden 10 mm (for character and props).

- MDF 3 mm (for bandoneon).

- Cardboard paper.

- Wooden ball diameter 20 mm.

- Corks.

- Galvanized wire diameter 2 mm.

- Galvanized wire diameter 1 mm.

- Galvanized wire diameter 0,7 mm.

- Glue.

- Sandpaper.

- Matte transparent spray paint.

Tools:

- CNC (or table saw).

- Coping saw.

- Mallet.

- Hammer.

- Drill.

- Bit.

- Vise.

- tweezers.

Step 1: Design

Make an automata is complex, like a piece of clockwork.

As I like tango, I decided to design and build a small orchestra made up of a musician who plays the bandoneon and another who plays the violin.

In this design the main shaft moves 5 cams that allow the movement of the two arms and the left leg in the case of the musician who plays the bandoneon and the left leg and the arm in the case of the violinist (see kinematics scheme).

In both cases I made a design where the right arm is connected to the head, so that the head moves.

My objectives were twofold: on the one hand, to use cheap and readily available materials and on the other, to make the assembly relatively simple.

I chose plywood and galvanized wire.

From sketches and drafts, I designed all the parts in ASPIRE VECTRIC and generated the gcode files for cutting with a CNC router. For other pics I import dxf files into 360 to show 3d view.

It is also possible to cut all the parts with circular lock or bench lock, for which you can use the available dxf files to print and paste on the wood to cut.

Here: the aspire and dxf files. https://1drv.ms/u/s!AoZa4oXuD3mOgolYxqHhKZpkpcp47Q?e=lk7Tsb

Step 2: Cutting Plywood

In this step we will cut the main support and its base and we will also cut the musicians' chair, the torso, the head and the covers of the bandoneon.

Once the pieces have been cut, sanding is very important as a previous step to joining the parts with glue and then painting.

For this process, I used the excellent DREMEL CNC designed by NIKODEM BARTNIK (with 500w chinesse spindle upgrade).

The CNC's work space can may seem limited, but for the hobbyist, and those who have never worked with CNC in general, I really recommend it!

https://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-3D-Printed-D...

BIT USED: Straight end mill milling cutter flutes (tungsten Steel) 1/8 ”cutting diameter and 1/8 shank diameter.

If you don't have a CNC, you can cut all the pieces with a table saw.

Step 3: Forming Main Shaft

In this step we will build the main shaft.

Before starting, we must ensure that the 2 mm galvanized wire is perfectly straight. This action is also necessary for 1 mm diameter galvanized wire.

To do this we will use the well-known method of fixing the wire at one end and adjusting it in the chuck of a hole punch at the other. The wire is rotated, the end of a few turns is perfectly straight.

See:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqsi9v6gkVk

Following the model and dimensions indicated in the photo we build the shaft.

To make the shaft, use a vice, pliers and with the help of curved objects such as nails, screwdrivers, etc.

The shaft should look like the last photo. Entering a hole in one of the wooden side faces and leaving the other.

Note that the various parts of the shaft match the holes in the drilled top cap.

To finish the shaft, cut a cork as in the figure (approx. 10 mm wide) and drill a 2.5 mm diameter hole to pass the shaft. Make 5 parts of cork like this and place it by one of the ends, sliding it until it reaches its final position.

Step 4: Assembling the Stand and Base

At the beginning of this step we must have all the pieces as seen in photo 1.

The support is assembled using glue to join the upper part that has holes with the lower part and the two sides. The type of joint designed allows the assembly to be very rigid.

Next, we make holes with a diameter of 2.5 mm in the side boards. In those holes the shaft will pass. Likewise, in the upper wood we will make two 2.5 mm diameter holes that will be used for mounting the characters.

Finally we will glue the 3 lower timbers of the base joining it to the main support.

For a perfect bond use joinery clamps as seen in the photo.

Once the whole is perfectly glued, all surfaces must be sanded prior to surface finish with paint.

We will use transparent matte spray paint. We will apply two coats. In the photo, notice that the axle was already assembled so it was covered with paper to protect it from the paint. If you. you are going to build this project, paint first then add the shaft.

Step 5: Pre Assembling the Characters and Props

In this step we are going to pre-assemble the character set and his chair, as well as his instruments:

Chairs:

- Glue the two parts of each chair (two squares of 30x30 mm).

- Drill a 2.5 mm diameter through hole from top to bottom.

Torso:

- Glue the two parts of the torso.

- Drill a 2.5 mm diameter holes on the shoulders, at the bottom and others as indicated in the figure.

- Note in the photo that the lower torso hole is made with an approximate inclination of 10 degrees with respect to the axis of the body.

- Only In the case of the violinist's torso, a 2.5 mm diameter hole must be made (see figure) to hold the violin with 1 mm diameter galvanized wire.

Head:

- Glue the two parts of the head.

- Make a through hole diameter 2.5 mm from the top of the head to its bottom.

Bandoneon:

- Cut two squares out of 3mm thick MDF, forming a 30mm x 30mm square top.

- Drill two 2.5mm holes in each cap.

- Use a 30 mm wide strip of brown cardboard paper to make a bandoneon as shown in the photo (in my case I used 3 glued sheets).

- At each end of the bandoneon glue the two 30mm x 30mm MDF wood tops.

Violin:

- Make four 2.5 mm diameter holes as shown in the figure.
- The ropes are made with 2.5 mm diameter galvanized wire.

- The fourth hole of the violin is used to wire it 2.5mm to the torso of the character.

Arms and legs:

- This are molded with galvanized wire diameter 0.7 mm in a spiral shape.

- To do this, use a wooden rod and wind the wire and then pull off the rod (see photo).

- Cut the size you need in each case.

Shoes:
- They are made with cork with a thickness of approximately 10 mm.

Step 6: Final Assembling

Assembling torso-chair:

Insert 2 mm diameter galvanized wire across the torso and making a fold at the top end of the wire. Pass that same wire through the chair and then through the top wood drilled into its 2.5mm hole. On the underside of the wood (where the chair is resting), pull hard on the wire and bend it in a circular way so that the torso-chair assembly is firm.

Before pressing down hard on the chair-torso assembly, apply a little glue to fix the chair to the upper wood.

Crank:

Make a 2.5 mm diameter hole in the 20 mm diameter wooden ball and insert it into the left end of the shaft. Then make a bend in the end of the wire so that the crank does not come off.

The body of the musician who plays bandoneon has:

- Right leg fixed to the base, made with 2 mm diameter galvanized wire.

- Left leg mobile made with 1 mm diameter galvanized wire. Connected to cam number 2 with 1 mm diameter wire.

- Right arm mobile (moves the bandoneon) and connected to the head, made with galvanized wire diameter 2 mm. Connected to cam number 1 with 1 mm diameter wire.

- Left arm mobile (moves the bandoneon). Connected to cam number 3 with 1 mm diameter wire.

- Arm and leg padding made with galvanized wire diameter 0.7 mm shaped in a spiral.

The body of the musician who plays violin has:

- Right leg fixed to the base, made with 2 mm diameter galvanized wire.

- Left leg mobile made with 1 mm diameter galvanized wire. Connected to cam number 5 with 1 mm diameter wire.

- Right arm mobile (moves the violin needle) made with 2 mm diameter galvanized wire. Connected to cam number 4 with 1 mm diameter wire.

- Left arm fixed takes the violin, made with 2 mm diameter wire.

- Arm and leg padding made with galvanized wire diameter 0.7 mm shaped in a spiral.

Note: preform arms and legs of wire before assembling it into the characters, as seen in the photo.

Assembly steps:

- Place the violin firmly on your shoulder.

- Place the wires of the two right legs in a fixed way to the upper wood.

- Assemble the wire with the head and this to each right arm.

- Assemble the five extenders of the cams using 1 mm diameter wire firmly fixed to each cork.

- Cams 1 and 3 move connect to the arms of the musician who plays bandoneon.

- Cam 2 connects to the left leg of the musician who plays the bandoneon.

- Cam 4 connects to the violinist's right hand.

- Cam 5 connects to the violinist's left foot.

Once completed, you just have to move the crank and the artists will play their favorite tango!!

Step 7: Final Words

That's all for this project! I hope you enjoyed this instructable.

If you have any question ask them in the comments below!

I would also love to hear what you think about the project.

Happy making! cfb70

PS1: if you like the project, please vote for this!

PS2/Credits: Abstract photo created by freepik - www.freepik.es

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    38 Comments

    0
    jeanniel1
    jeanniel1

    11 months ago

    The cam planning seems to get me in designing for automata. And I typically think in 3D but maybe not in motion ... I love how you outlined your thought process. Thank you!

    0
    cfb70
    cfb70

    Reply 11 months ago

    Thank you very much for your comment. I'm especially glad that you like my creative process. I really enjoyed this project. I love working in 3d, but it was a huge challenge working with cork, plywood and wire.
    Cheers !!

    0
    pwilson52477
    pwilson52477

    11 months ago

    love this sooooooooooooooooooooooooooo cool!:)

    0
    cfb70
    cfb70

    Reply 11 months ago

    Thank yoooouuuuuu!!! :)

    0
    jiminashland
    jiminashland

    Question 12 months ago

    Thanks for all your good work. I could not open your Aspire crv3D files with my Aspire versions. I could import the DXF files into Aspire but not Photoshop. I will recreate the Aspire file. Thank You for sharing! Jim

    0
    cfb70
    cfb70

    Answer 12 months ago

    You´re welcome Jim. Thanks for comment!

    I wonder if my Aspire version will be newer? Anyway, the two options to recreate the file in ASPIRE is to import or DXF file or Adobe Illustrator file that I have left in the shared link of OneDrive (now available).

    https://1drv.ms/u/s!AoZa4oXuD3mOgolYxqHhKZpkpcp47Q...


    The CNC cutting parameters that I have used are:
    **For plywood 12 mm feed rate 300 mm/min - number of passes 7
    **For plywood 10 mm feed rate 250 mm/min - number of passes 6

    BIT used Straight end mill milling cutter flutes (tungsten steel) 1/8" cutting diameter and 1/8" shank diameter.

    Do not hesitate to consult me about this or anything else.

    Cheers.

    0
    jiminashland
    jiminashland

    Reply 12 months ago

    Thank You for your prompt response. I will try your new uploads. FYI . . . I tried the original files with Aspire 9.0, 9.5 without success. Strange in that they would show up as icons. Stay tuned for more feedback from Southern Oregon!
    Jim
    https://jiminashland.jalbum.net/

    0
    cfb70
    cfb70

    Reply 12 months ago

    Very strange ... The files were created with Aspire 64 bits version 9.5 for windows. As I mentioned above, I think the option to create a new ASPIRE file by importing DXF or AI files will be a good option.


    PS: Let me mention your amazing and fantastic photography work: https://jiminashland.jalbum.net/. Each take is better than another.
    Thank you very much for sharing it and greetings for that beautiful place in USA !

    0
    jiminashland
    jiminashland

    Reply 12 months ago

    Yes, Strange. I am using the same version but I see others have had that issue as well. Perhaps they have some type of encoding to prevent piracy. No worries. I used your AI files and it seems fine. I have some high quality plywood and will use a downcutting compression bit to make for clean edges without tearout. Another option is some oak that I salvaged from an old cabinet. I am using the Shapeoko 3 XL to make my sawdust.

    Looking forward to replicating your nice work. Your Cryptic Calendar is inspiring too. It would be interesting to use a V-Carve inlay instead of paint. Check out this technique for excellent results - Feeling lucky to live in a beautiful area with lots of wildlife to keep it interesting. Check out these crazy turkeys in front of the house:
    Thank You again!
    Jim

    0
    cfb70
    cfb70

    Reply 12 months ago

    Hi Jim,

    I'm glad AI (adobe illustrator) files work ok. Good to know that you will build the project with good wood. TIP: As the exact dimensions of the CNC cut depend on several factors, I suggest you do a test for the fit between the two woods, in order to fine-tune the dimensions to avoid having to add filler material or sand too much (see photo of an initial test that I did with two woods smaller than the complete design).

    Regarding Cryptic Calendar, thank you for your suggestions with this alternative technical (video).
    I encourage you to build it too.

    Cheers.

    PS: How curious the turkeys fighting near your house! jajaja

    IMG_6925.jpg
    0
    jiminashland
    jiminashland

    Reply 12 months ago

    Thanks for the tip.
    I am building a vertical clamp for my CNC and this would be a good way to experiment with making finger joints. The spindle of the Shapeoko can extend out in the Y axis beyond the frame. If you are interested in seeing photos of the progress let me know . . . it is still in progress.

    Yeah, we even had a bear in the driveway last month, so the turkeys are not a big event. https://jiminashland.jalbum.net/2020%20Fall%20Phot...

    0
    cfb70
    cfb70

    Reply 11 months ago

    CNC Shapeoko are awesome. Yes...I would like to see your photos of the work in progress you are doing.
    PS: nice bear in the driveway :)

    0
    hgn1ymail
    hgn1ymail

    11 months ago

    Very cute!

    0
    cfb70
    cfb70

    Reply 11 months ago

    Hi. Thanks a lot ! Cheers

    0
    AlexisFromParis
    AlexisFromParis

    12 months ago

    Very cute, sensitive, nice and artitistic ! Bravo ! PS: Can you give us a link to the CNC you used, it looks very usefull ? Thanks :-)

    0
    AlexisFromParis
    AlexisFromParis

    Reply 12 months ago

    Thank you very much :-)

    0
    gdf55
    gdf55

    12 months ago

    Grammar alert. One of these things is an "automaton". If you build two, they're "automata".

    0
    cfb70
    cfb70

    Reply 12 months ago

    Yes ! you're right ! Automaton is singular and Automata is plural. Thank you very much for clarifying. Cheers !

    0
    IvoG1
    IvoG1

    12 months ago

    Very impressive! For the feet stomping, you might use some kind of spiral 1-tooth geer.