UK Ring Video Doorbell Pro Working With Mechanical Chime

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Introduction: UK Ring Video Doorbell Pro Working With Mechanical Chime

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Please note that this method only works with AC power right now

I will update if/when I find a solution for doorbells using DC power

In the meantime, if you have a DC power supply, you will need to replace it with the Plug-in Adapter V1, with provides the correct AC power. You'll then be able to follow this page to get your mechanical chime working.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Plug-Adapter-Ring-Video-D...

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I'm based in the UK and like many other people out there, I have searched and searched for a way to get a Ring Video Doorbell to chime a good old fashioned mechanical 'ding-dong'.

While this is a very straight-forward task in the US with their powerful rugged doorbells, over here in Blighty, our doorbells tend to work on a lower (and so much more respectable) voltage.

The Ring Video Doorbell Pro requires a constant power supply of 24V and this is supplied from a transformer which is included in the box. US doorbells can easily cope with this sort of power and can therefore be powered from the same transformer, as described in the official Ring wiring diagrams.

Unfortunately for those of us in the UK, you'd be hard pressed to find a chime that would work on this rating. Most require an 8V power supply coming from an appropriately rated transformer. And this is the crux of the issue. Ring, fully aware of this issue, simply suggest you remove or 'bypass' your mechanical chime completely, removing it from your doorbell arrangement. Instead, they supply a plug-in digital chime, and again this is supplied in the box (https://support.ring.com/hc/en-gb/articles/209622213-Video-Doorbell-Pro-Information).

Of course (subjectively), the digital chimes sound naff when compared to a good old-fashioned mechanical one.

Nevertheless, some people have gone for it anyway, connected their mechanical chimes to the 24V transformer, and found their chimes get hot and emit a constant buzzing/humming noise and at the same time, found they have increased by a few decibels. More of a "DING-DONG!!!".

This is neither ideal nor sensible and could create a fire hazard.

Conversely, some people have used the 16V option on the supplied transformer as this reduces (but doesn't eliminate), the buzzing/humming to more bearable levels. The issue with this is that it can cause your doorbell to cut out during power heavy tasks such as at night with night-vision on, using Live View, 2-way voice comms, etc.

Luckily there is a way of getting your Ring Video Doorbell Pro to chime a mechanical 'ding-dong' while both are being supplied with the power they want and need.

Rather than break this Instructable down into a step-by-step (because I didn't know I was going to do this so didn't really document my installation), I'll describe what I made, with pictures and diagrams so that you can use it as a reference rather than instruction manual. This might have been a better option anyway as each installation is different, with power in different locations and chime/doorbells at different proximities to each other.

IMPORTANT NOTE

This does require some work with mains voltages. Please follow Ring's safety precautions and seek professional advice if you are not sure.

Step 1: The Secret Weapon

I mentioned that there's a way of having both the Ring Doorbell Pro and the mechanical chime being supplied with the power they respectively need AND having the doorbell make your mechanical chime go "ding-dong".

This arrangement uses a 24V AC relay doing essentially the same job that an old-fashioned push-button doorbell does - completing the circuit for the mechanical chime thus making it "ding" (when the circuit opens again, this is when the chime goes "dong").

The relay sits in-between the 24V circuit for the Ring Video Doorbell Pro, and the 8V circuit for the mechanical chime, and this means you don't over-power the chime, or under-power the Ring Video Doorbell.

This image shows my bench testing that proved the concept.

Step 2: Wiring Diagram

These wiring diagrams show two different options and which one you use depends on whether your chime has a built in transformer (like the Byron 776), or is powered by an external transformer (like the Honeywell D126).

In either of these cases the wiring is essentially the same but you will need to check the specific requirements in your own chime.

As an example, mine is the D126 and in the image (taken from the packaging of the chime) you can see that I need to use terminals '0' and '3'.

For the relay, you need to make sure that the coil is being powered by the 24V AC. The switching is done when the doorbell pulls enough current to energise the coil, thus pulling the switch closed. You therefore need to make sure that your chime is wired to the Normally-Open terminals (NO), and not the normally closed (you'd probably hear a 'dong-ding' if you wired it this way not a 'ding-dong').

One thing worth noting is that when you power this system for the first time, as the doorbell boots up and starts doing its internal checks, connecting to the network, etc, you might hear your chime make a ding or a dong or two. This is completely normal and to be expected. It won't do random ding-dongs in normal operation.

Step 3: The Enclosure

You probably noticed from the diagrams in the previous step that I have shown the main components all lumped together in one box.

I went for this layout because it suited my specific needs - I wanted to keep the installation as neat as possible, having everything hidden away unless absolutely necessary. Luckily, my garage adjoins the main house and is just on the other side of the wall to where I mounted the chime. This meant I could put all the bits and pieces in the garage, out of sight.

I just needed to run one cable to the chime and one cable to the doorbell, back to the central location in the garage.

The actual enclosure is shown in these images. I'd say this is a pretty big box and I'm sure there are other neater options out there. I'll put a link to all the bits I used in a section below.

Step 4: The 'Bypass'

All Ring Video Doorbell Pro's, supplied in the UK, come with a 'Bypass' kit.

In its unaltered form this provides a level of protection for the doorbell itself. I've seen some people not using this in their installation as some people have found that their doorbells are less likely to cut-out if you leave this out. I think this is a mistake. Ring make a point of stressing that this is a necessary component in the installation.

HOWEVER, we don't want to use this in 'Bypass' mode because we're not bypassing anything. We're creating an installation that mimics that of the U.S. set-up. So we need to use this 'Bypass', not as a bypass, but in its other mode of operation - the 'Power Pro Kit'.

In the UK, these arrive in the box with a sticker showing you how to insert the cables into the 'bypass' connector.

For this installation, you'll need to peel back this sticker which will reveal another port on the opposite side.

You'll notice, however, that there is a connector in there and you haven't been supplied with the cable to fit it.

At this stage, you have two options:

***UPDATE***

You can now buy the PPK V2 separately. It's £1 but shipping is about £4.

https://en-uk.ring.com/collections/accessories/pro...

At the time of writing this instructable, it wasn't possible to buy these.

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1) you can call Ring and ask them to send you the cable for the PPK V2 (as you won't be using the 'Bypass' mode). Or,

2) you can butcher the unit and solder your own cables to the two pins inside (not recommended).

My recommendation is to phone Ring and ask them to send you the 'wire' for the PPK as you won't be bypassing your mechanical chime. They should send you a pack (the one shown in these photos), that includes both the wire you need and, in fact, another PPK - they do this because they don't actually supply the cable as a separate item. I guess it's not worth their while. There's no difference to the PPK you already have (but now you have a spare!).

One important note is that you'll need to tell your Ring Doorbell that it is connected to a mechanical chime. This is found in the device settings in the Ring app. When you do this, it basically tells the doorbell to pull a big lump of current (about 1 Amp), and then release the current and this is what energises the coil in the chime making the hammer move and strike the metal bars (the ding, and then the dong).

Step 5: Concusions

Hopefully there's enough information here to help you create your own installation.

Upon seeing my new doorbell, my neighbour asked me to do the same with theirs. Both of these were installed just after Christmas 2019 and have been working flawlessly since - no issues whatsoever.

If there were to be some sort of issue, with the enclosure, everything is easily accessible so would be straightforward to swap. That said, I haven't had to do any maintenance just yet.

One thing worth noting is that my whole system is powered from a spur to a nearby plug socket. The pictures don't show it but I have now added a 3A fuse (a switched fuse), to provide that extra protection. 3A should be more than enough.

All in all, I'm really happy with the installation and delighted to hear the mechanical "ding-dong" whenever the doorbell is pressed......

.........which is hardly ever.

Step 6: Components I Used

Enclosure - https://cpc.farnell.com/hylec/dn16t/ip66-general-p...

Relay (if you choose a different relay you need to make sure it is a 24V AC coil) - https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00PZXGHZY/ref=cm_sw_e...

Transformer - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Byron-7770-wired-rail-tra...

There is an AC plug-in power adapter here. This will allow you to replicate this set-up (DIN rail power supply no longer included - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Plug-Adapter-Ring-Video-D...

PPK V2 - https://en-uk.ring.com/collections/accessories/products/pro-power-kit-video-doorbell-pro

7 People Made This Project!

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119 Comments

0
Eugene2022
Eugene2022

3 months ago

Hello!

I have a Ring video doorbell Wired.
According to Ring it needs

Wired (16-24 VAC, 10-40 VA, 50/60 Hz), or Ring's own DIN-rail-transformer (2nd gen, 24 V DC, 0,42 A, 10 W) gebruiken (apart verkrijgbaar). Only make use of Ring DC net-adapter or DC ringtransformer. Or you will damage your equipment.

So Ring says their video doorbells work with their own DC net-adapter or DC ringtransformer. But never to use 3rd party DC ringtransformers.
(then only a 16-24V AC one). Why is this?
Could a "balanced" vs non-balanced ringtransformer be the difference causing this discrepancy?

0
ozzyozzy
ozzyozzy

Question 7 months ago

Hi guys,

I've just got a Ring Doorbell Pro (not the V2) version and it came with a plug in adapter. Now I'm really confused, the specs state that the included adapter is DC and I should use a DC transformer to hardwire the doorbell:

" • Use provided Plug-In Adapter 2nd Gen (24V DC, 0.5A, 12W). Plug-In Adapter features a 6m cable and comes with cable clips. Plugs into standard indoor electrical socket.

• Hardwired. You can also hardwired your doorbell if you have a compatible doorbell system (16-24 VAC, 10-40VA, 50/60Hz ), or you can use Ring DIN Rail Transformer 2nd Gen (24VDC, 0.42A , 10.0W) sold separately."

Anyway, my old "dumb" doorbell has always worked fine. I've been using a Byron 772 chime (without a built in transformer). The (8v) transformer next to the CU is one I butchered out of an old Friedland Doorbell when I was renovating. It was only supposed to be temporary but I've never got round to changing it.

I kept everything the same initially but just changed the doorbell button to the Ring Pro and everything worked fine except that there was a loud buzzing at the Chime.

I bought a Byron Transformer to replace the Friedland butchered jobby (https://www.screwfix.com/p/british-general-fortres... and wired it up as 24v. There's a load of reviews on Screwfix of people who have used this transformer with the Ring, Nest and other Doorbells but no mention of mechanical Chime.

Anyway, I switched the transformer out to the Byron one, everything works great except for a small buzzing which lasts for about 5 seconds after the bell is pressed and the chime has sounded, sometimes there's a quiet hum when using the mic on the Rin so I suspect the increased load causes noise at the Chime. When the Ring is idle, there's no sound at the Chime though.

I'm wanting to perfect the set-up and follow this guide but I can't find a Ring branded transformer online, can I use a Byron transformer (wired to 24v) as seen in the link above instead of the official Ring one and then a second same Byron Transformer (wired to 8v) for the step down for the Chime?

In the current set-up I've not used the PPKv2 as I only got the Bypass Kit and wasn't keen on butchering it. I've spoken to Rin today who are sending a PPKv2 out. Would this alone just solve the humming issue without the need to change anything else?

0
len dacruz
len dacruz

1 year ago

Hi dancase
I always wished I could re -use my Friedland Chime 963 York instead of bypassing. it as suggested by Ring. Alas this is possible ! Thanks for this wonderful site. and the work you have put in that saved me lots of grief.

i have just one question/ instead of the DPDT you had in your wiring was a DPDT relay. Could I substitute it with
SPST NO Finder 22.21.8.024.4000 Monostable Modular Relay SPST-NO 24VAC 20A
This relay spec as
as used byTim Reczek has a max current rating of 20 Amps. Will it work if the operating current is around 3 to 4 amps as my bell circuit was originally wired from a lighting circuit spur that can take up to 6 Amps max

lscooby

0
chibrasil
chibrasil

Reply 10 months ago

Hi Len
I am also trying to use the Finder relay https://www.rapidonline.com/Finder-22-21-8-024-400...
Did you manage to get it to work ?
Am I right to connect 1 & 2 to the 24v transformer and the Ring doorbell and A1 & A2 to the 8v transformer and the mechanical door bell ?
Thank you very much for your help.
Chi

0
len dacruz
len dacruz

Reply 10 months ago

Hi Chi
Please study the attached diagram ;a modified diagram from Tim Reczek, ci to explain my connections. there is also an inset diagram which explains the internal circuit of the Finder relay
A1& A2 should be connected to be in the the 24V circuit (hence the need for the 24V Finder Relay ) & connected in parallel with the Ring Pro Power Kit .

When the Ring doorbell circuit is activated by pressing the button ; A1 & A2 activate the internal Finder coil which then becomes a magnet (electromagnetic switch) that connects 1 and 2 in the 8V mechanical bell circuit to chime. There is a slight delay between the ring door bell and the chime being activated..
Please let me know if your project works

20210918_173748 (1).jpg
0
chibrasil
chibrasil

Reply 10 months ago

Hi Len, thank you very much. Looks like I have it the wrong way round. So A1 & A2 are connected to the ring doorbell while the 1 & 2 are connected to the 8V transformer that drives the mechanical chimes. Somehow I got confused with the wiring diagram from Finder datasheet.
Chi

Finder wiring dia.JPG
0
len dacruz
len dacruz

Reply 10 months ago

Hi Chi
I apologise for not responding to your request earlier. I needed to explain my wiring set up using a similar set up to Tim. Thanks for the data sheet from Finder
The data sheet diagrams provided by Finder do not apply to the Ring doorbell. They do not use the relay in their wiring diagrams to control 2 more voltage circuits from a 240V set up :1) a step down transformer 24Vac and 2) step down 8Vac. You are using the 24V to control the 8V circuit. Please let me know if my wiring set up now works your doorbell Did you have any response if any when you followed the wiring diagram supplied by Finder? I hope your Ring doorbell did not sustain any damage. My Finder relay took a few weeks to arrive. Rapid Electronics UK did not have it in stock. I ordered it from Mercateo East England 4421 working from Germany. The relay arrived 6 weeks later supplied by Rapid Electronics UK !!
Luckily I retained my original doorbell circuit and 8v transformer and was able to reconnected it to the Friedland chime 963 York and relocate the Ring doorbell to work as a camera.Please let me know how quickly you got your Finder unit from Rapid and the price you paid.
Len

0
chibrasil
chibrasil

Reply 10 months ago

Hi Len,
I see. Thanks for explaining.
I just realised that I have another problem. I purchased a Ring Pro 2 which has a 24 DC output (a DC transformer) to the doorbell - unlike the Ring Pro which has a 24 AC output (an AC transformer).
I now need to see how I can use a DC output to drive the relay which in turn drives a 8v chime (which is a Friedland under dome buzzer) . Perhaps, I need a DC to AC inverter to convert the DC output from the Ring transformer to AC which then drives the relay. All is getting complicated.
I ordered my Finder relay on the 4th Sept and got delivered on the 9th Sept - total cost including postage £19.66

Chi

0
len dacruz
len dacruz

Reply 10 months ago

Hi Chi
It appears Ring are racing ahead to make the previous generation of Ring products obsolete. There are new players in the market and we may need to update our equipment as spares will be No Longer be Available (NLA).
I will have to give some thought to this problem. However you can contact Ring directly. Their Customer Service Centre for the UK at this time of day is located in Cairo Egypt. You can request them to send you the relevant 24V AC. equipment for your door bell as your equipment was set up using AC. They were very helpful when I requested an AC transformer having explained my problem . I explained that I was using my own Chime and not using a Ring chime and that I wanted to retain my current one. I purchased my equipment from Amazon who sent me a transformer with a built in UK plug. It was a sealed unit that I could not use to implement my circuit setup. Ring will require the MAC address of the equipment you purchased which can be found on the box. They may also ask you to photograph the equipment you purchased as well. It is all done in real time. Don't be deterred, it is a cumbersome process but in my case persistence paid. Ring need to verify that you are a genuine Ring customer. I suggest that you try this avenue first before considering using an inverter.

0
chibrasil
chibrasil

Reply 10 months ago

which ring doorbell do you have - I understand Ring Door Bell Pro (1st generation) comes with a 24V AC transformer while the Ring Door Bell Pro (2nd generation) comes with a 24v DC transformer. Also it is not only the voltage (24V), I think the Ring doorbell pro 2 requires 20 VA (while most 24V transformer in the Uk only has 8 VA).

0
len dacruz
len dacruz

Reply 10 months ago


2nd Gen takes 100/240 V AC and outputs 24V DC 0.5 A and 12W of power with efficiency level VI
I did not use this one and hence unable to help. you will need to contact dancase
I would be interested as to how someone has implemented a solution to use the 2nd Gen equipment to handle the 8v AC Chime
If you give me your email address I will send you photos of the transformer I used.

0
chibrasil
chibrasil

Reply 10 months ago

Hi Len

thank you for the reply.

Is the transformer you used a Ring transformer - is it a 24V AC ? What is the VA - I think the Ring doorbell pro 2 needs at least 20 VA ...
Is this transformer the Ring AUBT1-24 ? I think this one only has a 24V AC but only 8 VA and is only suitable for Ring Doorbell Pro ..
where did you get this info (interested in the source) - "2nd Gen takes 100/240 V AC and outputs 24V DC 0.5 A and 12W of power with efficiency level VI" ?

0
len dacruz
len dacruz

Reply 10 months ago

this info is on the 2nd Gen power supply in tiny print. The termination with spade connectors identifies the polarity Red (+ve )and Black (-ve)
The transformer I used and supplied by Ring has terminations that allow connections to be made for -8V,-12V, &-24 V
You will need to contact Ring Community Support to help you out. It is an 0800 numberand as mentioned previously you can get put to either Egypt or California

0
chibrasil
chibrasil

Reply 10 months ago

ok - I will try to call them tomorrow. Just to confirm - is the Ring transformer that you obtained from Ring the AUBT1-24 (see attached image)

Ring AUBT1-24.JPG
0
len dacruz
len dacruz

Reply 10 months ago

Did you manage to get the AUBT1-24v. transformer from any source?
You may have to get hold of a substitute to power the 24V Finder relay .
Try RS, Mercateao, Rapid or similar large Electrical Component supplier. PLease let me know when you find a 24V transformer with the correct VA

0
chibrasil
chibrasil

Reply 10 months ago

Hi Len

I found a transformer with 24 vac and 15 w which should give 0.625 A -

https://www.knxshoponline.co.uk/trm-24-transformer...

which is sufficient as I connected them all up and connected the Pro 2 doorbell at the transformer (I wanted to do this first before dismantling the old door push at the front door) - they all worked. After setting up with the ring app and when I pressed the doorbell - both the doorbell and the buzzer sounded and there was image shown on my ring app alerting me someone at the door.

However, my problem is when I dismantled the door push (at the front door) and connected the pro 2 - when I pressed the pro 2 - both the doorbell and the buzzer sounded - but no picture - and the ring app said that the device is offline and has not got enough power.

I am just wondering if my old door bell cable (only just a thin wire) is not capable to carry enough power from the transformer to the doorbell?

0
len dacruz
len dacruz

Reply 10 months ago

0
chibrasil
chibrasil

Reply 10 months ago

I am using the one with the transformer (not with plug in adapter) - but we cannot use the Ring supplied transformer as it is a DC transformer and it won't work with the AC relay arrangement designed by Dancase.

Good find - they both seem to have the same 30VA - but different prices - where did you see it said 24VA ?

My wiring is very simple but the bell wire is very thin .....- so may be the resistance is too high ...

when I used a 3 core cable (5 metres long) to connect the ring doorbell to the transformer - I had no problems of getting sound and images on the Ring app.

The Ring app registered a voltage of 27 volts (instead of 24 volts) - presumably because the input voltage is higher than the 240 volts ...

The doorbell was quite hot - probably because the voltage is higher than 24 volts ...

I am thinking of buying the 1st generation Ring plug in adapter (as its output is in AC - so I can make it work with the AC relay ...) which is compatible with Pro 2 (as per Ring)

https://en-uk.ring.com/collections/accessories/pro...

and then perhaps - I can try one of the transformers that you found ...

and then last resort - probably is to replace the bell wire - but I have not checked if this is feasible - as the wire is run below the floorboard and behind plaster (and I am not sure if it is run through a conduit ....)

But I can say that the relay did work ....

Regards

Chi

0
len dacruz
len dacruz

Reply 9 months ago

Hi Chi

Have you had success in getting your buzzer working with the Finder relay in the circuit diagram I sent you?
A colleague has had problems with the Finder relay. your experience will help if you have modified the circuit or have you reverted to the circuit shown by dancase ?

0
chibrasil
chibrasil

Reply 9 months ago

yes - I am using the connection diagram that you sent me - and it is working.
Thank you.