UK Ring Video Doorbell Pro Working With Mechanical Chime

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Introduction: UK Ring Video Doorbell Pro Working With Mechanical Chime

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Please note that this method only works with AC power right now

I will update if/when I find a solution for doorbells using DC power

In the meantime, if you have a DC power supply, you will need to replace it with the Plug-in Adapter V1, with provides the correct AC power. You'll then be able to follow this page to get your mechanical chime working.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Plug-Adapter-Ring-Video-D...

*******************************************************

I'm based in the UK and like many other people out there, I have searched and searched for a way to get a Ring Video Doorbell to chime a good old fashioned mechanical 'ding-dong'.

While this is a very straight-forward task in the US with their powerful rugged doorbells, over here in Blighty, our doorbells tend to work on a lower (and so much more respectable) voltage.

The Ring Video Doorbell Pro requires a constant power supply of 24V and this is supplied from a transformer which is included in the box. US doorbells can easily cope with this sort of power and can therefore be powered from the same transformer, as described in the official Ring wiring diagrams.

Unfortunately for those of us in the UK, you'd be hard pressed to find a chime that would work on this rating. Most require an 8V power supply coming from an appropriately rated transformer. And this is the crux of the issue. Ring, fully aware of this issue, simply suggest you remove or 'bypass' your mechanical chime completely, removing it from your doorbell arrangement. Instead, they supply a plug-in digital chime, and again this is supplied in the box (https://support.ring.com/hc/en-gb/articles/209622213-Video-Doorbell-Pro-Information).

Of course (subjectively), the digital chimes sound naff when compared to a good old-fashioned mechanical one.

Nevertheless, some people have gone for it anyway, connected their mechanical chimes to the 24V transformer, and found their chimes get hot and emit a constant buzzing/humming noise and at the same time, found they have increased by a few decibels. More of a "DING-DONG!!!".

This is neither ideal nor sensible and could create a fire hazard.

Conversely, some people have used the 16V option on the supplied transformer as this reduces (but doesn't eliminate), the buzzing/humming to more bearable levels. The issue with this is that it can cause your doorbell to cut out during power heavy tasks such as at night with night-vision on, using Live View, 2-way voice comms, etc.

Luckily there is a way of getting your Ring Video Doorbell Pro to chime a mechanical 'ding-dong' while both are being supplied with the power they want and need.

Rather than break this Instructable down into a step-by-step (because I didn't know I was going to do this so didn't really document my installation), I'll describe what I made, with pictures and diagrams so that you can use it as a reference rather than instruction manual. This might have been a better option anyway as each installation is different, with power in different locations and chime/doorbells at different proximities to each other.

IMPORTANT NOTE

This does require some work with mains voltages. Please follow Ring's safety precautions and seek professional advice if you are not sure.

Step 1: The Secret Weapon

I mentioned that there's a way of having both the Ring Doorbell Pro and the mechanical chime being supplied with the power they respectively need AND having the doorbell make your mechanical chime go "ding-dong".

This arrangement uses a 24V AC relay doing essentially the same job that an old-fashioned push-button doorbell does - completing the circuit for the mechanical chime thus making it "ding" (when the circuit opens again, this is when the chime goes "dong").

The relay sits in-between the 24V circuit for the Ring Video Doorbell Pro, and the 8V circuit for the mechanical chime, and this means you don't over-power the chime, or under-power the Ring Video Doorbell.

This image shows my bench testing that proved the concept.

Step 2: Wiring Diagram

These wiring diagrams show two different options and which one you use depends on whether your chime has a built in transformer (like the Byron 776), or is powered by an external transformer (like the Honeywell D126).

In either of these cases the wiring is essentially the same but you will need to check the specific requirements in your own chime.

As an example, mine is the D126 and in the image (taken from the packaging of the chime) you can see that I need to use terminals '0' and '3'.

For the relay, you need to make sure that the coil is being powered by the 24V AC. The switching is done when the doorbell pulls enough current to energise the coil, thus pulling the switch closed. You therefore need to make sure that your chime is wired to the Normally-Open terminals (NO), and not the normally closed (you'd probably hear a 'dong-ding' if you wired it this way not a 'ding-dong').

One thing worth noting is that when you power this system for the first time, as the doorbell boots up and starts doing its internal checks, connecting to the network, etc, you might hear your chime make a ding or a dong or two. This is completely normal and to be expected. It won't do random ding-dongs in normal operation.

Step 3: The Enclosure

You probably noticed from the diagrams in the previous step that I have shown the main components all lumped together in one box.

I went for this layout because it suited my specific needs - I wanted to keep the installation as neat as possible, having everything hidden away unless absolutely necessary. Luckily, my garage adjoins the main house and is just on the other side of the wall to where I mounted the chime. This meant I could put all the bits and pieces in the garage, out of sight.

I just needed to run one cable to the chime and one cable to the doorbell, back to the central location in the garage.

The actual enclosure is shown in these images. I'd say this is a pretty big box and I'm sure there are other neater options out there. I'll put a link to all the bits I used in a section below.

Step 4: The 'Bypass'

All Ring Video Doorbell Pro's, supplied in the UK, come with a 'Bypass' kit.

In its unaltered form this provides a level of protection for the doorbell itself. I've seen some people not using this in their installation as some people have found that their doorbells are less likely to cut-out if you leave this out. I think this is a mistake. Ring make a point of stressing that this is a necessary component in the installation.

HOWEVER, we don't want to use this in 'Bypass' mode because we're not bypassing anything. We're creating an installation that mimics that of the U.S. set-up. So we need to use this 'Bypass', not as a bypass, but in its other mode of operation - the 'Power Pro Kit'.

In the UK, these arrive in the box with a sticker showing you how to insert the cables into the 'bypass' connector.

For this installation, you'll need to peel back this sticker which will reveal another port on the opposite side.

You'll notice, however, that there is a connector in there and you haven't been supplied with the cable to fit it.

At this stage, you have two options:

***UPDATE***

You can now buy the PPK V2 separately. It's £1 but shipping is about £4.

https://en-uk.ring.com/collections/accessories/pro...

At the time of writing this instructable, it wasn't possible to buy these.

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1) you can call Ring and ask them to send you the cable for the PPK V2 (as you won't be using the 'Bypass' mode). Or,

2) you can butcher the unit and solder your own cables to the two pins inside (not recommended).

My recommendation is to phone Ring and ask them to send you the 'wire' for the PPK as you won't be bypassing your mechanical chime. They should send you a pack (the one shown in these photos), that includes both the wire you need and, in fact, another PPK - they do this because they don't actually supply the cable as a separate item. I guess it's not worth their while. There's no difference to the PPK you already have (but now you have a spare!).

One important note is that you'll need to tell your Ring Doorbell that it is connected to a mechanical chime. This is found in the device settings in the Ring app. When you do this, it basically tells the doorbell to pull a big lump of current (about 1 Amp), and then release the current and this is what energises the coil in the chime making the hammer move and strike the metal bars (the ding, and then the dong).

Step 5: Concusions

Hopefully there's enough information here to help you create your own installation.

Upon seeing my new doorbell, my neighbour asked me to do the same with theirs. Both of these were installed just after Christmas 2019 and have been working flawlessly since - no issues whatsoever.

If there were to be some sort of issue, with the enclosure, everything is easily accessible so would be straightforward to swap. That said, I haven't had to do any maintenance just yet.

One thing worth noting is that my whole system is powered from a spur to a nearby plug socket. The pictures don't show it but I have now added a 3A fuse (a switched fuse), to provide that extra protection. 3A should be more than enough.

All in all, I'm really happy with the installation and delighted to hear the mechanical "ding-dong" whenever the doorbell is pressed......

.........which is hardly ever.

Step 6: Components I Used

Enclosure - https://cpc.farnell.com/hylec/dn16t/ip66-general-p...

Relay (if you choose a different relay you need to make sure it is a 24V AC coil) - https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00PZXGHZY/ref=cm_sw_e...

Transformer - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Byron-7770-wired-rail-tra...

There is an AC plug-in power adapter here. This will allow you to replicate this set-up (DIN rail power supply no longer included - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Plug-Adapter-Ring-Video-D...

PPK V2 - https://en-uk.ring.com/collections/accessories/products/pro-power-kit-video-doorbell-pro

6 People Made This Project!

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73 Comments

0
rsmith03
rsmith03

Question 5 months ago

Hi Dancase, thanks for putting this together for us, I actually managed to build it and it all worked!
One question for you, does your 24V AC transformer in your set up emit a small buzzing noise. It’s not crazy loud but enough to annoy you. Unfortunately for me i have to position the relays and transformers in a box in my hallway. And the buzz is just too annoying to leave it connected.
Interestingly when the ring doorbell is pushed the buzzing does temporary stop. I guess it must be current related?

For info, I got a 6VAC transformer built into my doorbell mechanical chime which runs through the relay switch.
Transformer through the relay coil is set to 24VAC. All wired up as per your circuits.

Any ideas how to get rid of this buzz?
Thanks for your help.

0
dancase
dancase

Answer 5 months ago

Oh no! Great news you got it working but nightmare with the buzzing!!

I have to say mine (and my neighbours), is nigh-on silent. I couldn't even begin to speculate about what could be causing it. And in fact - I'd have guessed at the opposite behaviour to what you're experiencing (buzzing under no load / no buzzing under load).

How weird!

The only buzzing I'm aware of from other people is typically when they're running the 24V straight into their 8V chime, but the even then, the buzzing comes from the chime, not the transformer.

I wonder if you could ask Ring to send you one of their 24V plug-in adapters to help investigate if you have a bad transformer. https://en-uk.ring.com/collections/accessories/pro...

I'm sure they'd be happy to do that. Failing that though, I did find another 24V DIN rail transformer but again, it would mean spending more money! https://www.screwfix.com/p/british-general-8-24v-8va-bell-transformer-module/8707P?tc=MA3&ds_kid=92700055281954493&ds_rl=1249401&gclid=CjwKCAiAsOmABhAwEiwAEBR0ZhlgGh3sScE-oUDhE9lzn_RgorDNoIw-JDPJCAboTm4xwJegmTGnPRoCIYQQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds#product_additional_details_container

Also - just checking you have the PPK installed and NOT using the bypass port. But again, this wouldn't explain the buzzing.

If you're able to get your hands on a multimeter it might be useful to know what your transformer is outputting. using the 24V terminals I'd expect to see the unloaded output (i.e. doorbell disconnected) to be about 28V. With the doorbell connected it'll probably be a bit lower than that - maybe somewhere around 20V (not sure about this figure though).

I guess you could also try connecting the doorbell to the 12V terminals on the transformer to see if that changes the tone/volume of the buzzing. It certainly won't damage anything but there may be some performance issues with the doorbell and chime (but maybe not).

Let us know how you get on and if you get to the bottom of it. Sorry I can't be of more use!!

0
Phuntoosh
Phuntoosh

Question 3 months ago on Step 1

Hi there. Thank you so much for the reference guide. I am doing the exact same setup. Except that mine connects to an 8v powered digital chime.
Just a quick question. You talk about the power pack pro/bypass module. I have just bought a new ring doorbell pro 2. It comes with a PPK V2. Do I still need to peel the sticker back on this and reveal the hidden port? Or does it wire in as it is straight to the relay as per your diagram?
Thanks.

0
dancase
dancase

Answer 3 months ago

Hi there! Great! Glad this was of use to you, and fingers crossed it all goes according to plan.

So, yes, definitely, it sounds like you'll need use the 'non-bypass' port for sure - the one behind the sticker, as you described - this is because the doorbell doesn't really know what it's chiming, so whether it's a digital chime, mechanical chime, relay, or something else, you'll always need to use the hidden port on the PPK.

The only situation where you would use the 'other' port (the bypass port), is when you don't have anything else in your system and you're just using Ring's wireless chime.

Just out of curiosity, are you planning to power it using the supplied DC power supply or the AC plug-in adapter? (or something else)?

I'm just curious because I haven't yet had success getting this arrangement to work with the Pro2 other than on AC. And even then, I suspect that the PPKV2 may cause issues with the Pro2. I've a feeling Ring are going to be releasing an updated PPK at some point.

I'd be really interested to hear how you get on and any observations you have.

Good luck!

0
Phuntoosh
Phuntoosh

Reply 3 months ago

Thanks for that.

I apologise that my electrical knowledge is not that great! I won’t be using the plug in adapter. Just the included 24v transformer as the power supply.

I assume that I will need to contact ring to ask them to send me the correct wires to use with the hidden port?

Lastly, if the relay coil is doing the switching for the “digital” chime, then i don’t understand what function the PPK has? What would happen if I was not to install it? From my understanding of your diagram, the setup is so that the ring doorbell receives its 24v, and the “existing” chime receives 8v courtesy of the relay coil. Hence I am confused what additional use the PPK is providing. Thanks.

0
dancase
dancase

Reply 3 months ago

Hi there.

Ah ok, I think I get your arrangement now. So, there's a slight problem in that the 24V transformer that is supplied with Pro2 is a DC power supply (rather than AC), and unfortunately, I've not had any success getting this arrangement to work on DC power.

There's a bit of a temporary work-around but it would require you to buy the AC plug-in adapter - I've put a link to the specific adapter right at the start of this page. If you do get the AC plug-in adapter it would mean you can follow this instructable and get it to work with your mechanical chime.

Frustratingly this is the only way I can get it to work right now.

I am working on a potential DC equivalent but I'm still trying to figure out the specifics at the moment so don't have a solution to share right now. As soon as I do though I'll reply to this thread to let you know either way.

In terms of the PPK you can in fact buy a brand new one that will come with the right cable - I've also put a link to this a bit further up on this page - in the PPK section. I think it's about £4 in total with delivery.

The PPK provides a couple of different functions - it's acting an electronic fuse firstly to protect the Ring doorbell from power surges, but in this arrangement (using the 'normal-mode' port), it also acts as a path of least resistance to prevent the chime being constantly supplied with power. When it detects the increased current from someone pushing the doorbell, it electronically increases its resistance to ensure all the current is passed through the chime to make it 'ding-dong'.

Hope this helps!

0
Phuntoosh
Phuntoosh

Reply 3 months ago

Ah! Now I understand it.

Right. So I will get the plug in adaptor rather than use the included 24v DC transformer.

I also re-checked. There is no PPK in the box with the doorbell pro 2. It just cones with some wires and gray caps to "bypass" the existing chime.

So my only question is: If I order the PPK V2 from the ring website - will that already come with all the wires/connectors I need to run it in PPK mode? Or will I still need to solder more wires?

0
dancase
dancase

Reply 3 months ago

Ah great. Yea, it's a shame to have to buy a plug-in adapter. It seems that Ring are moving away from AC power supplies in favour of DC, but of course that trips up this little arrangement.

It's specifically the V1 plug-in adapter that you'll need for now.

Oh yes! Apologies I forgot all about the fact there's no PPK in the Pro2 kit. As far as I know, if you buy the PPKV2 from Ring, it'll come in the little packet shown in this picture with the cable already plugged in.

IMG_4072.jpg
0
Phuntoosh
Phuntoosh

Reply 3 months ago

That’s brilliant.

One other option I thought of. Instead of the plug in adapter, would it be possible to just buy a 24v ac transformer off Amazon and use it instead of the dc transformer that came in the box?

0
dancase
dancase

Reply 3 months ago

This is a tricky one because I'm no expert here - I think if you had the first Pro, the answer would be yes, you could just use something like this:

https://www.screwfix.com/p/british-general-fortres...

The slight problem with this transformer is that it isn't really spec'd for the power requirements of the Ring Video Doorbell Pro. While it does output 24V AC, the power rating is only 8VA (Volt-Amps), and the Ring Pro should really be supplied with 20VA. That doesn't mean the doorbell won't work. In fact it will, and probably quite happily. There's a slight risk that during power-intensive tasks, like at night, with the IR LEDs on, and while doing a live view 2-way audio, the doorbell might not get the full juice it needs, and cut out (before restarting and powering back up again).

Now.... that's all for the first Pro.

For the Pro 2, this is a much more 'power hungry' device and would almost certainly cut-out at various points if you used that Screwfix transformer - it simply wouldn't be able to give the doorbell what it needs - I think this is also one of the reasons Ring are moving to DC supplies (amongst others).

Not straightforward is it!?

I hope this was of some use and apologies for not being able to give a quick and easy solution.

Like I said, I'm hoping to have a DC work-around soon. At which point, you'll be able to use the DC transformer that Ring supplied. More to come on this.

0
Phuntoosh
Phuntoosh

Reply 3 months ago

No it’s been brilliant. I really appreciate appreciate your help. I have returned my doorbell and now purchased the doorbell pro 2 with the plug in AC adapter. The PPK kit will arrive later on.

Just so it’s clear for me. As per your wiring diagram, where would the plug now fit in? So now I currently have my 8v chime connected to its own transformer via the main fuse board. This also has a wire going straight out to the push button. The ring doorbell will also be plugged into a socket. So both items have their own separate AC power supply.

So how would I best link up the relay between them in this scenario?

Thanks.

0
dancase
dancase

Reply 3 months ago

Hello again! Great news! Although, frustrating about the hit & miss-ness! You reminded me that there is actually a setting for digital chimes (instead of mechanical).

If you go to the Device Settings > General Settings > Internal Doorbell Settings and then set the doorbell type to 'Digital'. It should then give you the option to change the duration of the ring - Assuming your digital chime tone lasts for about 3 seconds, I would set 4 seconds, and that should make sure the whole tone is played.

It'd be interesting to hear if this alters the intermittent-ness.

0
Phuntoosh
Phuntoosh

Reply 3 months ago

Hello there again. I’m nearly there! Just need a little more help if possible.
As my chime is digital rather than mechanical - it has 4 wires instead if 2. Two of them are currently connected to the 8v power transformer and the other two are for the chime itself. (Previously connected to the doorbell push button)

This is what was causing me the confusion. So basically from your relay diagram, do I connect the two 8v wires to port 3 and the other two chime wires to port 5? Or do I split the pairs so that one of each goes into each port? Ie. One 8v wire and one chime wire in port 3 and the same for port 5?

Sorry if this isn’t clear.

0
Phuntoosh
Phuntoosh

Reply 3 months ago

Thanks for that.

Yes. I have tried to play with those settings. However at present, when I press the ring doorbell, I can hear my indoor chime start. But the melody abruptly stops within a second.

I can’t seem to let it play the whole tune from start to finish.

0
Phuntoosh
Phuntoosh

Reply 3 months ago

Hello Dan.

Finally got the thing wired up. All seems to be functioning Ok except my internal chime. It seems to be a bit hit and miss with the relay. Sometimes it rings. Sometimes it cuts off before completing the melody. Of note, my internal chime is actually an 8v ac digital chime rather than a mechanical chime. Would this require any tweaking to the wiring setup?

0
ChrisEw
ChrisEw

Question 5 months ago

A very useful site. I have built the set set up described and all seems to work fine. There is one issue however related to the fact that my existing mechanical chime is battery operated. The 24v ac relay comes into operation 3 secs after the bell is pushed and remains on for a full 21 secs. This means the mechanical door chime is drawing a heavy current from the batteries for the full 21 seconds when all that it requires is a momentary pulse (as per using a conventional door push). The consequences of this are a0 the batteries will be drained in a very short time and b) the dong occurs 21 secs after the ding ! Does anyone know how to either adust the duration the relay is activated or have a simple circuit to convert the 21 sec 'pulse' to a 1 sec (or less) pulse ?

0
dancase
dancase

Answer 5 months ago

Oh no! 21 seconds!? That's huge! Do you have any pictures of your set up?

What kind of relay do you have? Did you set the doorbell type to 'Mechanical' in the Ring app? Something is definitely not right there.

The observation about the 3 second delay seems consistent with other what I and other people have observed. Although, this doesn't seem to do this all the time - sometimes it can be instant but I've not figured out what the pattern is there.

In my experience the Ring Pro is designed to 'let go' after about 0.5 seconds at which point you get the "dong", but it sounds like either the relay is sticking (for about 21 seconds), or the doorbell is doing some other power-intensive task which means enough current is flowing to hold the relay contacts closed.

Any pictures you have might help figure out what's going on, and it'd be worth double checking that you have 'Mechanical' set in device settings.

Mechanical-Chime-Setting-Location.jpg
0
ChrisEw
ChrisEw

Reply 5 months ago

Thanks for the quick reply.The relay is a 24v ac versuion from Amazon as below...
SovelyBoFan JQX-13F LY2 AC 24V Coil 8-Pin DPDT Red LED Electromagnetic Relay
Product Name : Electromagnetic Relay
Model No. : JQX-13F/LY2
Coil Voltage : AC 24V
Contact Capacity : 10A 240VAC /28VDC
Type : DPDT
Yes, the App is set to 'Mechanical' chimes. Interestingly when set to 'Digital' it gives a similar surge holding the relay in for 21 seconds. As expected when set to "None' the relay doesn't trigger.
I have attached some photos. Probably a bit difficult to see the detail so I have also attached my own circuit diagram, where you can see the colour of the wires (matching the photos) labelled. Note this is a breadboard prototype so the actual battery operated mechanical chimes are not in the photo. The blue and yellow wires from the N/O relay contacts are intended to go to the chime and effectively replace the original bell push. ie when momentarily closed completes the battery circuit and pulses the solenoid in the chimes.
I guess the next step might be to investigate the shape of the current surge pulse to see if its actually 21 seconds long or whether the relay might have some hysteresis, although that seems very unlikely.
Any other ideas appreciated.
Chris

Ring Chime Circuit.jpegIMG_4771.jpegIMG_4772.jpeg
0
ChrisEw
ChrisEw

Reply 5 months ago

I have done some measurements. The ac surge through the relay is indeed only momentary (not long enough for the ac/amps multimeter to swing across the full scale) but after that there is a constant dc voltage of c 26v across the coil for 21 seconds. It must be that that is holding the relay in position. Would suggest the doorbell pro is drawing a dc current for some reason !