Wind Chimes

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Introduction: Wind Chimes

The Wind, we cannot control it be we can use its effects to create many things including music.

This Instructable shows how to make a Windchime from an assortment of metal parts.

Supplies

Large tin can.

Small tin can.

22mm copper tubing.

Cable ties.

Wire.

Electrical terminal blocks.

3mm drill bit.

5mm drill bit or countersink bit.

Ruler.

Marker Pen.

File.

Can opener.

Masking tape.

Centre punch.

Step 1: Making the Chimes

The chimes are made from 22mm chromed copper pipe.

Using a pipe cutter or a saw cut 4 length of pipe.

The lengths I chose were 20mm, 18mm, 16mm & 14mm feel free to use different measurements for different notes.

Having cut the pipes remove any sharp edges with a file.

Wrap a length of 25mm masking tape around the end by which the chimes will hang and mark a point 12mm from the end.

With a 3mm drill make a hole straight through the pipe to create 2 holes, remove any sharp edges with a file and/or a 5mm or larger drill bit.

Tread a cable tie through both holes in the chime and join the tie making sure not the pull the tie too tight, the loop created needs to be relaxed.

Step 2: Making the Chime Hammer

The chime hammer is made from a small metal can.

Using a can opener cut off the base of the can and with a file remove any sharp edges.

With a ruler and/or compass find the centre of the lid and mark it with a felt tip pen and/or hole punch.

Drill out 5 holes in the can with a 3mm drill bit and with a 5mm drill bit or larger remove any burrs.

Through the hole in the chime hammer fit a 3mm pop rivet such that the shank is still attached.

At this stage you may wish to paint the chime hammer to resist the affects of the weather.

Step 3: Making the Chime Hanger

The chime hanger is made from a large container with a metal base.

Using a can opener cut off the base of the container and with a file remove any sharp edges.

With a ruler and/or compass find the centre of the base and mark it with a felt tip pen and/or hole punch.

Proceed to mark the base into quarters with a ruler and using the chime hammer aligned with the centre draw around the outer edge of the chime hammer.

Measure 11mm from the edge of the chime hammer and along each quarter line mark a point which will become the hole to hang the chime.

Drill out 5 holes in the base with a 3mm drill bit and with a 5mm drill bit or larger remove any burrs.

At this stage you may wish to paint the chime hanger to resist the affects of the weather.

Step 4: Hanging the Chimes

Measure 2 length of wire.

These will be bent at right angles at 2 points to pass through 2 holes along the same line on the chime hanger.

Do the same for the other wire.

You should now have 4 lengths of wire protruding through the 4 holes in the base

Where the ends pass through to the other side of the chime hanger bend a loop the same distance at each end were the chimes will hang.

Step 5: Hanging the Chime Hammer

Cut a length of wire of sufficient length to allow the charm hanger to hang freely from the suspension point.

Bend a loop in the end to hang it on the suspension point.

Pass the loop free end through the chime hanger to come out on the underside and secure with one screw of a terminal connector.

Into the other end of the terminal connector secure with the other screw a length of cord

This will be attached to the chime hammer by a second terminal connector via the cord and the pop rivet shank.

Assembly is complete.

All that remain to be dome is hang the windchime is a suitable location and adjust the position of the chimes relative to the chime hammer.

The length and type of cord may require adjustment to swing freely and additional weight added to the chime hammer, magnets are very suitable if a ferrous metal can has been used.

Additionally, magnets can be added to the chime hanger to balance the chimes.

All you need do is set back relax and listen to the melody assuming there is a suitable breeze.

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    2 Comments

    0
    tercero
    tercero

    10 months ago

    They look nice, but from experience don't sound all that great. It's the schedule wall that makes all the difference to the way wind chimes, well, chime. Thicker walls contribute to dull less resonating notes.
    The thinner the wall, the more melodic the chime. Finding schedule walls that are thin enough gets a bit tricky. Emt tubing and copper K 1m will do, but if you can. Look on sites that sell tubing specifically made for wind chimes. You'll be much happier with the results.

    0
    Gammawave
    Gammawave

    Reply 10 months ago

    Thanks for the comments. Thicker walls are actually an advantage in my case as not all people like the high pitch resonating sound offered by thinner walls maybe a minority in this regard. The design does lend itself to easy modification allowing the chimes to be replaced with a variety of resonating materials to suit the listeners tastes. Did a search as suggested and found many at very low cost were some people may question why make one at all. But then again rather make than buy.