Wooden Gate and Fence With Concrete Post

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Introduction: Wooden Gate and Fence With Concrete Post

About: My name is Blake, I make things for a living. I love experimenting with new materials to create sculptures, furniture and everything in between.

I build a DIY #wooden #fence #gate with a concrete supported post. I used reclaimed fencing and ended up only spending around $30 on this entire build! This is a quick and easy way to build a fence and gate with no sag. If you have a planer you can try using reclaimed fence boards like I did!

Step 1: Step by Step Video Instruction.

Step 2: Use Child Labor to Dig Hole for Concrete Post.

Lets be honest, nobody likes digging holes. I was lucky enough to hire this neighborhood contractor to dig the hole for me. For each concrete post, you want to make sure the hole is around 2ft deep by 12" wide. You will need to use a pressure treated 4x4 for this.

Step 3: Concrete Post

Set the pressure treated 4x4 in the hold. Make sure it is completely straight by using a level. Hold the 4x4 in place by using clamps, or braces so it does not move when pouring the concrete. For the concrete, I used 3 bags of quickrete. It is as simple as mixing water with the concrete until you get "oatmeal-like" consistency. Then just pour the concrete in the hole, pack it down using a shovel. Allow overnight for the concrete to cure before putting any kind of weight to it.

Step 4: Get Fencing for FREE!

The secret is out. I got every fence board and 2x4 for FREE by calling all the local fencing companies and asking them if they had any jobs with old 1" thick boards. Fencing companies have to pay to take old fencing to the dump. Most of the time, fences get replaced because the 4x4 in the ground rots out and topples over. This means that the actual fence boards are sometimes still good. Note that obviously some boards are not going to be used. I have found that any 1" old fence board torn out, I can salvage about 50% of them. Once I get a nice collection of old 1" boards, I remove all the nails and screws and then throw them through my thickness planer. Now if you don't have a thickness planer, you can just use the boards as is, (the fence will just look old). If you want a new looking fence I would recommend finding someone with a planer, or purchasing new lumber.

Step 5: Building the Gate

Measure the size of the opening of the gate between the 4x4's. I then subtracted 1" to that measurement to allow for some wiggle room for the gate to open and close. I then constructed a simple frame using 2x4s. It is crucial to add a cross 2x4. This will prevent the gate from sagging over time. I also tend to go overboard on strengthening things, so I also added 4 braces on all corners.

Step 6: Attach Fence Boards.

This is a simple process. I attached two horizontal boards on the bottom, then attached all the vertical boards by using 1 1/2" wood screws.

Step 7: Complete Fencing Around the Gate.

I used two 2x4's and used pocket screws to attach them to the two 4x4 posts. I then used the same method as the gate by placing two horizontal fence boards along with the vertical boards using 1 1/2" screws.

Step 8: Attach Gate

PUT SHIMS UNDER THE GATE. This part is crucial. You need to put shims underneath the gate. This will allow it the wiggle room to not scrape across the ground. I used 1" shims. Then attach the hinges making sure that the bolts are going into the studs on the backside of the gate.

Step 9: The Hammer Handle.

I didn't have any door handles on hand, and I am simply too lazy to go to the hardware store. Instead I opted for fabricating a door handle out of an old hammer. I first cut off around 6" of the handle. I then cut some scrap square metal tubing to act as my risers behind the hammer. Using long 3" screws I screwed them through the hammer, inside the square tubing on the backside and into the fence. I love the look of the hammer handle and it was really easy to do with scraps.

Step 10: Round Off the Corners.

Because I used the 1" shims when attaching the gate, it made the gate 1" taller than the rest of the fence. In order to smooth out this transition I used a jig saw and rounded over the first couple of fence boards on the gate.

Step 11: Watch the Entire Process!

Thanks for viewing this instructable and watching the video!

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    17 Comments

    0
    warlordking69
    warlordking69

    7 days ago

    While an ok diy you said dig your post holes 2 feet deep, while fine in some places you should tell people to check local building codes and frost depth. Not everybody lives in a warm climate.

    0
    BMsculptures
    BMsculptures

    Reply 6 days ago

    That is a good idea. I am not familiar with different climates. I only know what is standard here in Clovis, CA which is always warm and dry.

    1
    soppmail
    soppmail

    7 days ago

    I believe the crosspiece should have the lower end on the hinge side. This will allow the piece to push up on the top of the latch side and keep it from sagging. Wood is better at pushing than pulling.

    0
    BMsculptures
    BMsculptures

    Reply 6 days ago

    I didn't realize the brace was the wrong direction until I installed it. whoops!

    1
    roberthoyle0
    roberthoyle0

    7 days ago on Step 2

    It's too bad you put the brace in the wrong corners. You would give the gate better support by placing the brace from the bottom hinge position to the top open side. I've built many gates and doing it this way I've had them last 20 plus years.
    Nice gate though and enjoyed the build.

    0
    BMsculptures
    BMsculptures

    Reply 6 days ago

    I know. I may change it. I didn't realize it was the wrong direction until it was already installed. whoops

    0
    cspann560
    cspann560

    7 days ago

    Great job! I've done similar for some friends. Planing works but lacking that, pressure washing will get the grime off , You can sand it afterward or not.

    0
    BMsculptures
    BMsculptures

    Reply 7 days ago

    Yes I forgot to mention that you can pressure wash, or just plain sand the fence boards!

    0
    mrgomes123
    mrgomes123

    7 days ago on Step 9

    Where are the pictures of the old shovel handle?

    0
    BMsculptures
    BMsculptures

    Reply 7 days ago

    what old shovel handle? The one I restored a couple months back?

    0
    mrgomes123
    mrgomes123

    Reply 7 days ago

    You wrote ..." I didn't have any door handles on hand, and I am simply too lazy to go to the hardware store. Instead I opted for fabricating a door handle out of an old shovel..."

    0
    BMsculptures
    BMsculptures

    Reply 7 days ago

    Oh NOO!!! lol that was a typo... I guess I was thinking "shovel" in my head vs the Hammer. Thanks for catching that. I will edit it!

    0
    soppmail
    soppmail

    Reply 7 days ago

    Your picture of a hammer says shovel.

    1
    shalnachywyt
    shalnachywyt

    7 days ago on Step 2

    Instead of using child labor, you could've hired some neighborhood canine contractors. :)

    0
    BMsculptures
    BMsculptures

    Reply 7 days ago

    hahaha

    0
    BMsculptures
    BMsculptures

    Reply 11 days ago

    haha Thank you brother! I like how you did yours with the double cross bracing... Makes me want to go back outside and add another brace!