18'' Speaker Table

1,115

18

2

About: I make whatever i want to make :)

I had an 18'' Sub speaker, that I burned at some party... and decided not to
recone it, but buy a new, better one that will not burn easily.

So, the burned one was useless to me laying around my place. Years later I was thinking to throw it away, but than this idea of using it as a part of furniture came up, since it is quite a niece looking quality speaker.

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Step 1: Idea and Parts

Since the speaker was a part of my stage equipment, I tried do make a table in "stage" style.
I bought single point aluminum truss pipes that are usually used for hanging lights and other stage equipment.
The standard ones are 50mm in diameter, but there are also smaller, so I used 4 pieces of 35mm diameter 0,5m long truss pipes.

Step 2:

The pins for connecting the truss pipes are usually included. I divided them in half, so I got 8 "half pins" instead of 4 full ones. This is how I got the solution, to screw the pins on a flat surface and than fasten the pipes on them.

I drilled holes with threads in the pins. Bottom ones in the centre, and top ones out from the centre, since the speaker edge was not thick enough and I needed to use some custom "spacers" to screw the pins to the speaker.



Step 3: Custom Parts

As mentioned, I needed some spacers to make the pins stick out of the speaker's mounting edge.

I ordered them at a local laser cut shop made from 3mm stainless steel. At this point I also ordered the bottom circular base, that connects the legs and makes the whole thing stable.

The base needed dome brushing to look niece.

Step 4: Assembly

Assembly was quite easy at this point.
Just some screws and pins from the truss pipes and it was done.

Step 5: Glass Top

The
last thing was the glass top.

I ordered 6mm tempered glass 600mm in diameter.

The speaker has 8 mount holes. I used 4 of them to mount the legs and the rest 4 to mount the glass. I 3d printed small spacers and screw them in the holes, then glued the glass on the spacers with black epoxy glue.

Spacers are the same height as the speaker's foam top, so the epoxy glue just holds the glass in place, while it is actually lying on the circular foam.

Step 6: Final Touch

Add some anti schratch self adhesive legs at the bottom, not to damage the wooden floor with metal base.
And it is done!

Trash to Treasure

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    2 Discussions

    None
    Ashburner

    4 months ago

    Looks really great. LOVE IT

    None
    fawazam

    Tip 5 months ago

    You could use this to pull off some pretty neat magic tricks! Just emit a high enough frequency sound and you could shatter the glass cup on top of it! Just and idea...