2 Brick Forge

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Introduction: 2 Brick Forge

I have been looking for a 2 brick forge design for a while and couldn't find any that met my needs. Most are 1 Brick Forges that are really too shallow for what I want to do.

I am working on longer pieces of 1/4 and 5/16th stock at about 5"-7" lengths.

This is my parts list:

  • 2 Fire Bricks 9"X4.5"X3"
  • 1" spade bit
  • 5/8th spade bit
  • 5/16th drill bit
  • Cold Chisel
  • 36" 5/16 - 18 threaded Rod cut into four even pieces 9" long
  • 16 5/16 - 18 nuts
  • 8 split washer
  • 4 one foot length 1"X1" steel angle stock
  • Power Drill

I decided that I needed an 8"x3"X3" chamber, so I marked the brick with a permanent marker.

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Step 1: Drilling

Using the 1" spade bit, I drilled out a honeycomb from the soft brick to a depth of about 1 1/2". I marked the spade bit to how deep I wanted it to go.

I took my time because of the soft nature of the Fire Brick, I didn't want to crack it.

Once I drilled out the chamber I used the 5/8ths bit to drill the hole to insert the burner.

Using the chisel as a scraper, I smoothed out the chamber floor and walls.

Step 2: Brackets

I drilled 2 holes on either end of one side of each angle stock. The stock should extend about 1 1/2 " past the brick.

I used a nut/split washer/nut method to measure out the leg height and locked the nuts in place on one end of each of the threaded rods. About an inch high.

Step 3: Final Assembly

Sliding the rods threw the holes and bracing each side of the bricks, sandwiching them together, thread the remaining nuts in the same nut/split washer/nut assembly to secure the brackets around the bricks.

Step 4: First Burn

Light and slide your propane burner into the hole on the side.

When I did the first burn, there was also a dust cloud from where I didn't get all the dust from the scraping out.

Also, I have read that a lot of these fire brick forges tend to crack during use. Most instructions that I read recommended just wiring the brick together. I thought that wouldn't look nice, which is why I went with the angle stock brace.

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65 Discussions

0
CharlesR62
CharlesR62

2 months ago

Nice Forge, I'm going to try to make one only use 4 Bricks, the ones shown as the ends and 2 more for the top and bottom pieces to give more surface area plus making the forge a little bigger. Any reccomends for a morter or Cement to hold them together that will with stand the heat?

0
squirejoe2
squirejoe2

Reply 2 months ago

I used the pressure that was created by the angle braces and the screws on the threaded rods. I did not use any mortar or cement. Those held up well and also helped keep the whole assembly together when thermal cracking occurred.

I know Home Depot and Lowe's carry a Furnace Cement that is rated to 2000 degrees f. Maybe between that and the angle braces, it might help, but that is just a guess.

Let me know how that goes!

0
RyanRamos98
RyanRamos98

4 years ago

I would have put like 2 or three burners on top would you think that works better? Ive seen some brand name forges with a similar structure but with the burners on the top

0
squirejoe2
squirejoe2

Reply 4 years ago

The reason I went with the side for the burners is because I was lazy and didn't want to figure out a bracket so they wouldn't fall into the chamber. I can't think of a reason it wouldn't work from the top.

About putting 3 burners in, due to the size, I would be worried about structural integrity. The fire brick I used was very fragile and can crack easily from significant thermal changes. Mine has cracks from usage. Adding a 3rd hole might be too much, but that is just my opinion. I have not tried it.

The bricks I used were only about $6, so I wasn't to concerned about breaking a couple, so I would say go for it. If it works, AWESOME! If it fails, at least you learned something.

0
apowell25
apowell25

4 years ago

i love this. wondering if you can fill the back with coal in opposition to propane using a hair dryer to supply oxygen as seen in other instructables.
My plan is to try just that. ill take pictures and credit this post

0
squirejoe2
squirejoe2

Reply 4 years ago

Go for it and let me know how it goes.

The only drawback that I could see is that the chamber is rather small. The amount of coal you would need to get the metal hot enough might take up too much space and you would be constantly feeding it.

0
sammcleod97
sammcleod97

4 years ago on Introduction

love the simplicity to it.... but I'm seeming to have some trouble drilling out the hole. Can I get the manufacture of your bit?

0
CodyL4
CodyL4

4 years ago

super awesome! easy design but I seem to be having some trouble with air flow. the air inside isn't circulating enough oxygen to keep it lit. I'm using a propane torch but it'll only burn for a couple seconds. I'd rather not have to drill more holes to allow air in unless that is what I need to do. any ideas on how to solve that problem?

0
CodyL4
CodyL4

Reply 4 years ago

I figured it out. I was too ambitious with the flame size. thanks for the reply though.

0
squirejoe2
squirejoe2

Reply 4 years ago

awesome. let me know how it works for you. I am debating on drilling a second hole 1/2 way down for a second burner. I will update this if I do that.

slightly on topic; any dutch people who know where to get these "fire bricks"??? or at least a proper translation? and nice ible !

0
Tango-Oscar-Mike
Tango-Oscar-Mike

Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

I'm from the Netherlands, and quite a while ago we built our own fireplace. We ordered some fireproof bricks from this site:

http://www.bouwcenter.nl/Webshop/Bouwmaterialen/Ov...

Depending on where you live you might want to consider stopping by there. Living in Brabant, I've got one quite close to me.

Hope this still helps you, if you haven't yet found what you were looking for.

0
knutknackebröd
knutknackebröd

Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

thanks for the input, but the problem is there aren't any shop nearby as far as i know and the shipping cost is often twice as much as the order itself!

0
Tango-Oscar-Mike
Tango-Oscar-Mike

Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

I'm from the Netherlands, and quite a while ago we built our own fireplace. We ordered some fireproof bricks from this site:

http://www.bouwcenter.nl/Webshop/Bouwmaterialen/Ov...

Depending on where you live you might want to consider stopping by there. Living in Brabant, I've got one quite close to me.

Hope this still helps you, if you haven't yet found what you were looking for.

0
squirejoe2
squirejoe2

Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

vuurvaste Brick ?

isolatie van de baksteen ?

I am using Google Translate, so I hope that helps?

Also Kiln Supply shops for Ceramics.

0
knutknackebröd
knutknackebröd

Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

haha quite commical translations, these are really litteral and probably will just get you funny looks if you ask for them in a store:P thanks for the input though!
ps. might be a good idea to look into ceramic shops

0
squirejoe2
squirejoe2

Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

Happy that I could make you smile! :-D

Good luck!

0
M2aestro
M2aestro

5 years ago on Step 4

I really like the free-standing nature of the legs for this thing, and would remind folk not to leave this on a wood bench or against flammable materials...don't laugh, I've seen that done with older torch pots!