3D Printed Air Purifier -- Get Rid of ABS Smell and VOC's

About: I have a ton of fun making things... especially things that go BOOM! Whether it's 3D printing, welding, or just building cool stuff, I have a great time doing it.

HOLD UP: A few people smarter than me commented and noted that this doesn't get rid of UFP's (ultra fine particles) This respirator cartridge has a P100 filter in it but some of the super fine particles will still get through. It still does get rid of the smell and VOC's namely formaldehyde which is a carcinogen. There isn't much you can do for the UFP's except make sure you chamber is sealed and/or vent it to the outside (best way). Just thought I'd let ya know :)

Hey guys! Hows it going?!?!?!?! So I've been addicted to 3D printing for 3 freakin years now and I have dumped... ahem.. invested almost every stinkin' stupid penny I have into this hobby. KEY WORD: Invested (means I have a clear conscience when I see how much is in the ol bank account)

Now I LOVE to print with ABS. In fact, I've done so much printing with this stinky warping crap that I've even found ways to partially "un-warp" the stupid stuff. Now all it took was $50 (excluding the enclosure) to fix the other huge downside of ABS (the part where it stinks and the stinks is toxic). It wasn't not easy but here it is!I call it the "Air Wizard 2.0 5,000". JK butt seriously no not really it's just an air purifier for the inside of your printer enclosure.

It's extremely easy to print and put together. It uses easy to find and easy to replace respirator cartridges! This particular one I used is a "3M Formaldehyde Organic Vapor Cartridge/Filter 60925, P100 Respiratory Protection" which, as far as I understand, is the best type for this application.

Step 1: Parts

Links to files and parts:

(1x) 120mm radial blower

(1x) 12v wall adapter

(1x) 2 pack of filters

cheap PLA I like to use

(1x) part file at Thingiverse.com

Note: Some of these links are affiliate links (clicking the links, or even better buying the item, will help support the development of future projects. It costs you nothing though!) As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Step 2: Super Easy Assembly

1: Print out the adapter

2: Put a ring of hot glue around the rim of the fan to seal it. Make sure to press the adapter on while still hot.

3: Optional but recommended - - Bolt adapter to fan

4: twist on your respirator cartridge and you are good to go!

Step 3: Enjoy!!!

Hope you find this useful! If it's not much trouble could you subscribe to me one YouTube?

DISCLAIMER:
Always check with your manufacturer and keep in mind that this air purifier has not been tested and I can not guarantee that it is effective.

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    17 Discussions

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    garzo

    Tip 3 days ago

    To everyone that suggests to have a sealed chamber to minimize the chance of air polluting: you don't actually have to have a sealed chamber. At the opposite, you should have some (small) air entrance, otherwise the filter fan can't properly work. As long as the fan can produce some underpression in the chamber no pollutant will exit (except from the filter, but that's a filter fault) because it's the clean air that will enter the chamber, not the polluted air that will exit.

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    Alex Kov

    6 days ago

    This project makes me wonder: is there anything that CAN NOT be 3D printed?

    1 reply
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    KyleD122

    7 days ago

    Unfortunately this doesn't do much for the harmful VOC or UFP's in question. It's a really cool setup but based on research and studies the emissions in question are much smaller than what this filter screens out. P100 filters filter 0.3 micron and large particulates. The emmissions detected from 3d printing are on the order of 0.02 microns, around ten times smaller. See below sources and Google for more info on recent studies. reference 100nm=0.1 microns.

    https://pksafety.com/blog/what-does-p100-mean/

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02786826.2017.1342029?src=recsys

    https://www.google.com/search?client=ms-android-verizon&ei=d103XLzIO8q10PEP7MKn-AE&q=microns+to+nm&oq=microns+to+nm&gs_l=mobile-gws-wiz-serp.3..19j0l3.15947.17197..17581...0.0..0.184.886.0j6......0....1.........0i71j0i67j0i20i263j0i131.jzXpPir83Ig

    The reason I say this is not to deflate bubbles on really cool possible solutions, it's because there is allot of misinformation and false safety solutions like this going around that further confuses people. currently alot more research is being done as more is needed for difinitive safety guidelines. Please research if you plan to 3D print without a serious ventilation and filtration solution to understand the risks.

    8 replies
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    JustinB37KyleD122

    Reply 7 days ago

    Wow, I came here to share that exact study :)

    Definitely wouldn't be trying to burst any bubbles either and don't think you are.

    This may help reduce the smell, but harmful particles are still going to get out unfortunately.

    Might help to rename the title of this and put the disclaimer at the top?

    Keep being addicted to this awesome hobby! I know I am :P

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    KyleD122JustinB37

    Reply 7 days ago

    Yeah I have a list of studies I have been forwarding to our industrial safety team at work so they start looking into this. Since I saw the article title here I was excited to see if someone figured it out. Seems sealed printing with outside ventilation is the key for now...

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    Yeah I'll put a disclaimer. I would think though that this filter isn't obsolete as it still removes the VOC's. I thought this thing had the UFP's covered but I guess not. Prob just add a "HEPA" filter and be good to go? Thanks btw. Wouldn't want anybody (myself included) to think they're ok and not be. I appreciate it!

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    Happy_Mad_ScientistKyleD122

    Reply 7 days ago

    It actually does filter out the VOC's. Namely formaldehyde which is carcinogenic.
    As for the UFP's I thought that the p100 was considered HEPA (i guess that's a buzz word huh?) and HEPA filters are what's in my UpBox and supposed to get rid of that crap. I guess I was wrong. Are there different levels of "HEPA" filters that are supposed to get rid of the super small stuff?

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    KyleD122Happy_Mad_Scientist

    Reply 7 days ago

    My mistake, although I would need to break out the old chemistry book as VOC have to do with boiling point, I think, and UFP is a group of particulates under a certain size. So maybe they're could be overlap? But thank you for clarifying in your article. I love printing both at work and home and hope there is clarity soon on the proper safety precautions. Even at the massive company I work at they are still trying to figure this out... Thanks again, love the idea, if you find anything new on protection against UFP's I look forward to hearing about it. Happy and safe printing!

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    Haha, exactly! We care about your life!

    But unfortunately HEPA filters will be inefficient as well. While studies show that HEPA filters can capture at less than 0.3 microns that is all they are rated for. And as Kyle mentioned and is written about in the study, ABS can go as low as 0.02 microns. I don't know of any filter that will work currently (But willing to learn about one if I'm wrong) - Basically you still need a properly sealed chamber for your printer and sealed ventilation out of the room.

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    Ok that's prob why I was confused cause I've been told HEPA filters are what you need and p100 does what a HEPA can (or is considered HEPA).... now it all makes sense! Thanks again!

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    FusionBolt77

    7 days ago

    Do you have an estimate of how long each respirator cartridge will last?

    2 replies

    My good advice: change them every ~20hrs like the manufacturer says
    My bad advice: I think I can make em last 200+hrs. So far I've printed about ~80hrs and it's hard to tell but I think it's prob at 90-95% yet. I still can't smell any "fumes" at all in the room I have it in. As soon as I smell the stuff though it's gettin changed. If you had a sealed enclosure you could prob just turn it on a minute or two before you open it and make it last really long.

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    Yonatan24

    7 days ago

    Why did you choose to use this type of radial fan/impellor/blower instead a regular fan, like a PC fan? Do they have more suction power to get the air through the filter?

    1 reply
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    I was told they have more suction power but I'm not sure. This kind of fan is easier to mount to a wall or ceiling though. If you really need a lot of suction I've heard air bilge pumps are good but loud.