AnglEase

17,992

120

41

Please note that this project is 100% original!

PATENT PENDING

Need a simple, effective way of setting common angles, this is for you. Please look above for some feedback we recieved and please comment down below to tell us what you thinl.

Step 1:

Step 2:

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    41 Discussions

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    PaulB709

    2 months ago

    Finished making this today. Made all parts complete using oneCNC CadCam and machined on a Mazak VCN410A Vertical Machining Centre. Looking to surface grind all over soon.

    IMG_20190501_155733.jpg
    1 reply
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    dustee1000PaulB709

    Reply 2 months ago

    Looks good. It'll lookbeven better once you've ground it all over.

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    Don Barthel

    3 months ago

    I've redrawn the AnglEase using dustee1000's measurements and drawings using OpenSCAD. The .scad and .stl files are here: http://donbarthel.com/AnglEase.zip

    You can use the .stl files to create 3D prints. You can use the .scad script files to modify the objects. Programming required because OpenSCAD isn't a traditional CAD software, its a 3D programming language.

    I used a 5mm bolt in the pivot point.

    I've modified the Setting Piece to add a 'key' on the bottom that fits in the slot of the Bottom Piece. I printed the Setting Piece on its side using supports. The other pieces don't need supports if you orient them strategically on the print bed.

    Thanks to dustee1000 for his/her design.

    AnglEase_print.jpg
    4 replies
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    PaulB709Don Barthel

    Reply 2 months ago

    Same as you with the setting piece. I have drilled and tapped it for a dowel on the bottom that sits in the slot

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    dustee1000Don Barthel

    Reply 3 months ago

    Thanks for adding this information. I'm sure it will be useful in helping others to make their own on a 3D printer.
    It looks great in the photo.
    My only reservation is with you using a screw at the fulcrum point. The original design requires a close fitting pin. The fit with a screw may allow for movement at this point, altering the accuracy.
    Thanks
    dustee1000

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    dustee1000Don Barthel

    Reply 3 months ago

    Wow! That looks amazing it is a great feeling when someone else has made an instructable. It looks amazing! I

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    CNC GUY

    3 months ago

    Hi, I run a tool company in Iceland and this tool is excellent

    1 reply
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    dustee1000

    3 months ago

    Thank-you to all this who have voted, favourited and provided some constructive criticism, here are some comments that we received alongside 100's of more positive ones.
    Click below to enlarge

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    Jhonbaker

    3 months ago

    Super cool. I want one! Don't have the ability to mill metal - just wood. So far. lol - Anyway this is easily my favorite entry into the make a tool contest -

    1 reply
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    dustee1000Jhonbaker

    Reply 3 months ago

    Thank you very much, please vote! Instead of million you may have access to a laser cutter or 3-D printer so you could manufacture that way. Or you may even have a local makerspace that may be willing to help you.
    If you read below someone has infant given it a shot at 3-D printing and theirs looks great so far
    Dustee 1000

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    murf1979

    3 months ago

    Perfect for any machinist. Only suggestions are maybe a way to lock the setting piece in place, for repetitive use of that angle and better dimensioning on the print for the setting piece.

    Overall, fantastic piece that you can be proud to make and pass on

    3 replies
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    dustee1000murf1979

    Reply 3 months ago

    Another member has suggested to put in a spring to keep on the tension the parts. This seems a good improvement, and will solve the problem you have raised.
    dustee1000

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    dustee1000murf1979

    Reply 3 months ago

    Thanks for your comment.
    You have a valid point about locking the setting piece in place. The location in the radial grooves on the top piece is very positive when in position, and does hold itself in position very well, and has no tendency to want to "pop" out.
    If i was to make improvements in this area, I would make a 8mm peg, press fitted into the bottom of the setting piece to travel inside along the 8mm groove in the bottom piece.
    dustee1000

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    dustee1000murf1979

    Reply 3 months ago

    That is a great idea, I will look into adding it into the design, please show your support by voting!

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    _soapy_

    3 months ago

    Brilliant idea.
    A couple of improvements: add a "0 degrees" parallel setting, if only for smaller storage size and retention of the moving part. Add a spring to hold the device closed, so it can be used any way up, or at odd locations.
    I'll do the CAD in a minute.

    1 reply
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    dustee1000_soapy_

    Reply 3 months ago

    Thanks for the tips. Everyone of them is worth adding to the AnglEase. I'm sure the would be room for the spring within the slot at the pivot end.
    I didn't consider engraving a zero position onto it, but it would be a definite indication to show it will be parallel in the closed state.
    I did consider milling a pocket to store the setting piece so it wouldn't get lost. I'll leave that to the individual if they want to do that.
    dustee1000

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    _soapy_

    Question 3 months ago on Step 1

    I don't understand this step at all? What's the lathe for? This isn't a shape that can be turned by human hands.

    1 answer
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    dustee1000_soapy_

    Reply 3 months ago

    This is an error in the instruction. I will amend today. The round bar is clamped in a 3 jaw lathe chuck, and clamped into the milling machine table, with the end of the bar pointing up and the profile is machined into the end of the bar. It is then parted off on the lathe.
    I hope this clears up this problem for you.
    dustee1000