AnglEase

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Please note that this project is 100% original!

Need a simple, effective way of setting common angles, this is for you. This project is easily understood and can be manufactured in a variety of ways using a variety of machinery:

There is a 360 degree real life video and next to this is also an image on how the AnglEase will be used. Below is an animation that I created in Fusion 360 showing how the AnglEase will be operated.

Step 1:

Step 2: Alternative Method of Manufacture

The images above are attached in order of the steps.

1. If a CNC Milling machine isn’t available it’s possible to drill a series of holes to produce the location positions for the different angles.

2. Tangents can be cut between the holes as shown above in red.

3. Sharp edges need to be filed smooth and corners can be rounded so as not to interfere with the setting tool.

Using a laser cutter

1. It would be great if you could laser cut this Instructable and share it below in the "I made it section".

2. Of you were to laser cut this Instructable you could go about it two ways:

a) Use Autodesk add-on for Fusion 360 : Slicer. I have attached the link to the add-on here, and this is a great video for beginners on how to use the software here.

b) Using the downloadable 3d model and the drawing I have attached above you could create a clip together version of this project, I would do this in Inkscape, here is a book on Inkscape for beginners.

Using a 3-D printer

3. Here are the 5 main steps in order to get your model ready for printing provided by Lifewire:

Make Sure the Model is Seamless

Hollow the Model for Lower Cost

Eliminate Non-Manifold Geometry

Check Surface Normals

Convert Your Model

You could also watch this on Youtube.

Step 3: Thank You!!!

Please share your creations down below.

The images in this Instructable are free for non-commercial use, the image used above is from the Instructables website.

I have attached all the instructions formatted as a word document!

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    37 Discussions

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    Don Barthel

    21 days ago

    I've redrawn the AnglEase using dustee1000's measurements and drawings using OpenSCAD. The .scad and .stl files are here: http://donbarthel.com/AnglEase.zip

    You can use the .stl files to create 3D prints. You can use the .scad script files to modify the objects. Programming required because OpenSCAD isn't a traditional CAD software, its a 3D programming language.

    I used a 5mm bolt in the pivot point.

    I've modified the Setting Piece to add a 'key' on the bottom that fits in the slot of the Bottom Piece. I printed the Setting Piece on its side using supports. The other pieces don't need supports if you orient them strategically on the print bed.

    Thanks to dustee1000 for his/her design.

    AnglEase_print.jpg
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    dustee1000Don Barthel

    Reply 21 days ago

    Thanks for adding this information. I'm sure it will be useful in helping others to make their own on a 3D printer.
    It looks great in the photo.
    My only reservation is with you using a screw at the fulcrum point. The original design requires a close fitting pin. The fit with a screw may allow for movement at this point, altering the accuracy.
    Thanks
    dustee1000

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    dustee1000Don Barthel

    Reply 21 days ago

    Wow! That looks amazing it is a great feeling when someone else has made an instructable. It looks amazing! I

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    CNC GUY

    25 days ago

    Hi, I run a tool company in Iceland and this tool is excellent

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    dustee1000

    25 days ago

    Thank-you to all this who have voted, favourited and provided some constructive criticism, here are some comments that we received alongside 100's of more positive ones.
    Click below to enlarge

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    Jhonbaker

    25 days ago

    Super cool. I want one! Don't have the ability to mill metal - just wood. So far. lol - Anyway this is easily my favorite entry into the make a tool contest -

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    dustee1000Jhonbaker

    Reply 25 days ago

    Thank you very much, please vote! Instead of million you may have access to a laser cutter or 3-D printer so you could manufacture that way. Or you may even have a local makerspace that may be willing to help you.
    If you read below someone has infant given it a shot at 3-D printing and theirs looks great so far
    Dustee 1000

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    murf1979

    27 days ago

    Perfect for any machinist. Only suggestions are maybe a way to lock the setting piece in place, for repetitive use of that angle and better dimensioning on the print for the setting piece.

    Overall, fantastic piece that you can be proud to make and pass on

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    dustee1000murf1979

    Reply 25 days ago

    Another member has suggested to put in a spring to keep on the tension the parts. This seems a good improvement, and will solve the problem you have raised.
    dustee1000

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    dustee1000murf1979

    Reply 26 days ago

    Thanks for your comment.
    You have a valid point about locking the setting piece in place. The location in the radial grooves on the top piece is very positive when in position, and does hold itself in position very well, and has no tendency to want to "pop" out.
    If i was to make improvements in this area, I would make a 8mm peg, press fitted into the bottom of the setting piece to travel inside along the 8mm groove in the bottom piece.
    dustee1000

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    dustee1000murf1979

    Reply 26 days ago

    That is a great idea, I will look into adding it into the design, please show your support by voting!

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    _soapy_

    25 days ago

    Brilliant idea.
    A couple of improvements: add a "0 degrees" parallel setting, if only for smaller storage size and retention of the moving part. Add a spring to hold the device closed, so it can be used any way up, or at odd locations.
    I'll do the CAD in a minute.

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    dustee1000_soapy_

    Reply 25 days ago

    Thanks for the tips. Everyone of them is worth adding to the AnglEase. I'm sure the would be room for the spring within the slot at the pivot end.
    I didn't consider engraving a zero position onto it, but it would be a definite indication to show it will be parallel in the closed state.
    I did consider milling a pocket to store the setting piece so it wouldn't get lost. I'll leave that to the individual if they want to do that.
    dustee1000

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    _soapy_

    Question 25 days ago on Step 1

    I don't understand this step at all? What's the lathe for? This isn't a shape that can be turned by human hands.

    1 answer
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    dustee1000_soapy_

    Reply 25 days ago

    This is an error in the instruction. I will amend today. The round bar is clamped in a 3 jaw lathe chuck, and clamped into the milling machine table, with the end of the bar pointing up and the profile is machined into the end of the bar. It is then parted off on the lathe.
    I hope this clears up this problem for you.
    dustee1000

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    Don Barthel

    26 days ago

    What is the diameter of the holes to drill for the notches? I could not find it listed and I cannot seem to open the DXF files in either Inkscape nor in an in-browser DXF file viewer.

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    dustee1000Don Barthel

    Reply 26 days ago

    Gis Don
    The Diameter is 10mm. On the drawing it states 5mm radius.
    It would be great to see your finished AnglEase.
    dustee1000

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    Don Bartheldustee1000

    Reply 25 days ago

    I programmed an OpenSCAD script to re-imagine the top piece using the measurements you provided. Here's a photo of the print. I'll do the same for the other pieces later in the week and after verifying that they make a reasonably accurate instrument I'll post the script (and STL files) here.

    20190331_184311.jpg
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    dustee1000Don Barthel

    Reply 25 days ago

    That looks great Don.
    I'm please that someone has attempted to 3D print this tool.
    Thanks for showing your work.
    I'll look forward to seeing the finished tool.
    dustee1000