Circuit Lumber Punking

Welcome to the Circuit Lumber Punking Instructables.

Why create circuit boards in timber. Well it's not really about the timber, it is more about celebrating the electronic components and not hiding them away. Timber is a great medium to do this with. Timber is beautiful and for me so are electronic component with their arrangement on a circuit board and odd shapes and colours. Timber is also nice to work with and easy to laser cut.

What I hope is this Instructable shows a process but not purely for replication, instead exploration into what could be done with these two mediums.

This project is associated with my PhD research and as such is required to abide to an ethical standard, please click on this link for further details. (Research Ethics Number - 2016/858)

Please leave comments in the section below.


I would love to know if you have built either of these devices, and if you have, please send an image.

Let me know if I have missed anything, and I will edit accordingly.

If this Instructable has inspired you to build something else, please let me know, I would love to hear from you.

Supplies:

Step 1: Intro to Microbit Musical Instrument

Both of the follow example projects are an extension of the Kitronik Inventors Kit (KIK) experiments. These examples can be found on this link: Kitronik Microbit Inventors Kit

The first device (above) is a Musical Instrument using an external light sensor (LDR), and variable resistor (potentiometer) and the Microbits on-board accelerometer to create a rudimentary (or to some just plain rude) musical instrument.

This is a combination of KIK experiment:

- Using A Light Sensor And Analog Inputs Experiment 2

- Setting The Tone With A Piezo Buzzer

- Dimming An LED Using A Potentiometer

PLEASE NOTE - The update Kitronik Inventors Kit has a photo-transistor and not an LDR. Please see this link for the update - ALSO - PLEASE NOTE THE POLARITY OF THE PHOTO-TRANSISTOR

- Photo-transistor and Analog Read

The second image is the prototype for this device.

The file below is an Illustrator file for Micorbit Musical Instrument. Please note that you may need to change the colouring of the lines, to ensure it is compatible with your laser.

Step 2: Intro to Temperature Controlled Fan

The second device is a temperature controlled cooling fan, using a transistor to power an electric motor with a fan. This circuit is programed to turn the fan on or off according to a temperature threshold.

- Using a transistor to drive a motor
- Dimming An LED Using A Potentiometer

The second image is the prototype for this device.

The file below is an Illustrator file for Microbit Temperature Controlled Fan. Please note that you may need to change the colouring of the lines, to ensure it is compatible with your laser.

Step 3: Tools You Need

Tools required for the project are:

The pre-cut wooden boards - laser cutter required. I will be creating a further instructables showing the workflow in how I created these boards but for now I have supplied the Illustrator and pdf file for you to download and use. The plywood used, is around 1- 1.5mm thick. Any thicker than that, you will have problems with electronic component legs protruding through the board.

Components used in the Kitronik Inventors Kit.

A soldering iron.

Some solder.

A soldering third hand - to help things from sliding around.

Wire cutters and pliers and maybe eye protection would be a cool thing to throw on.

Some hook up wire - I use old CAT5 solid core network cable - this stuff is always laying around.

5 - M4 nuts and bolts about 10mm long.

A microbit and computer to connect the Microbit for software upload.

- This is the Microbit website

- An Instructables link for beginners on the Microbit

Step 4: The Build : Microbit Instrument

The video demonstrates the task of building the Microbit Musical Instrument.

Use the images and schematics to help to understand the point to point wiring.

As well, I have attached screenshot of the block program, also the hex file to upload the the microbit.

Step 5: The Build : Temperature Controlled Fan

The video demonstrates the task of building the Microbit Temperature Controlled Fan

Use the images and schematics to understand with the point to point wiring.

As well, I have attached screenshot of the block program, also the hex file to upload the the microbit.

Currently the temperature threshold is set to 31 degrees C, upload the file to Makecode Editor and change the threshold if required.

I have also attached a second version of the fan program. This program uses the button to change the temperature threshold. Button A increases the threshold, starting from 29C, Button B decreases the threshold temperature. Pressing Button A and Button B together, the microbit will display the current room temperature.

Step 6: Bye Bye

Above is another project I created in the same fashion.

This is a 555 timer chip noise maker. Maybe I will create another Instructable on this.

As well, I will be doing a prequel to this project, and demonstrate the process I used to create the Lumber Punk circuit board... Stay tuned.

I hope you have enjoyed this Instructable

Please leave comments in the section below.

I would love to know if you have built either of these devices, and if you have, please send an image.

Let me know if I have missed anything, and I will edit accordingly.

If this Instructable has inspired you to build something else, please let me know, I would love to hear from you.

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    2 Discussions

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    SimonGo

    11 days ago

    These are a great way to practice soldering as wood is a better (and and reusable) option than a plastic circuit board for practice. Also the schematics were great for me to use as a reference to make my own for laser cutting.

    1 reply