Custom Binder Sheet Organizer for Trading Cards or Small Parts

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I searched for a better storage technique for my electronic components because until now I've used box organizer to organize my resistors and small capacitors but those don't have enough cells to store each value in a different cell so i had some values share a cell which made the process of getting the component i need for the project annoying because i had to measure each component until i found a one that fits.

If you like the instructable please vote for it in the storage contest.

Step 1: Idea

I came out with a way to divide the binder sheet into cells of customizable size and amount and it can be done in 10 minutes with only 2 additional parts.

Step 2: Tool and Parts

Parts:

  • Binder sheet ( one per binder sheet you need ).
  • Sticky labels ( one per cell ) - I found mine thrown near the grocery store and they work great.
  • A thin cardboard piece ( dimensions - length - a bit less than the binder width , width - any , preferably short enough that the piece will fit inside the binder sheet.

Tools:

  • Soldering iron (preferably one with adjustable temperature because i don't know how the binder sheet reacts to 350°C )
  • Box cutter or a craft knife ( like a xacto knife ) would work the best but i found out that even a metal ruler can cut the binder sheet although it makes the cuts less clean.
  • Long Metal ruler ( we'll use it as a guide to melt the sheet in a straight line ).
  • Pen or pencil or marker for temporarily mark the position of the cuts and melting.
  • A heat resistant surface like an old baking tray or a glass sheet.

Step 3: Cutting

WARNING : Be Careful! - The following step includes cutting with a sharp tool so be careful and i don't bare any responsibility if you hurt yourself or someone else.

According to the number of cells per column you want mark the necessary cutting points for the openings for each cell. After marking those insert your cardboard piece so that it protects the other side of the binder sheet from getting cut and then use the ruler tom make a clean cut along all the width of the binder sheet according to the markings you made.

In order to calculate where to make the cuts divide the binder length ( 32cm in my case ) and divide it by the amount of cells per column . Mark so that between each mark the distance is the one you just calculated and start from the bottom but don't mark at the bottom.

(In the pictures you see I chose to divide my binder sheet to 16 cells - 4x4)

Step 4: Melting the Rows

WARNING : Be Careful! - The following step includes melting with a soldering iron at a temperature of at least 200°C and the melting of the plastic will produce unhealthy fumes so turn on a fan or follow this step in a ventilated area and try not to breath in the fumes .Please be careful and i don't bare any responsibility if you hurt yourself or someone else.

In order to not damage your working area perform this step on the heat resistant surface.

After we've made the cuts we'll need to close the bottom part of the cell , to do this we first remove the cardboard piece, then we set the soldering iron to the minimal temperature (In my case about 230°C) then we'll rise about 3-5mm from any place we've made a cut and with the help of the ruler we slowly pass the soldering iron across the width of the binder sheet.

Tips: I recommend to incline the tip of the soldering iron a bit to increase the area in which the iron touch the binder sheet .

Step 5: Melting the Columns

WARNING : Be Careful! - The following step includes melting with a soldering iron at a temperature of at least 200°C and the melting of the plastic will produce unhealthy fumes so turn on a fan or follow this step in a ventilated area and try not to breath in the fumes .Please be careful and i don't bare any responsibility if you hurt yourself or someone else.

In order to not damage your working area perform this step on the heat resistant surface.

At this step we'll divide the cells in each row.

Keep the soldering iron in the same temperature from the previous step.

Firstly, we need to mark where we'll divide so divide the width of the binder sheet ( about 22cm in my case ) by the number of cells per row you want and mark lines at the top with the distance between them that is the number we calculated from either left to right or right to left but don't mark the edges.

After you mark use your ruler to melt in a straight line across the length of the binder sheet at each marking.

Step 6: Labeling and Storing

The last thing to do is just add labels that specify what component is stored in each cell ad store that component in the cell. This is all the more important with components like resistors in which it's hard to see from outside what value they are . You can use any type of labels from printed labels to paper tape you write on. I used grocery store price labels.

Step 7: You're Finished

Congratulations! you've created your own custom binder sheet. I suggest to create multiple sheets because you'll most likely wouldn't be able to stuff all your component in one sheet ( it took me 2 sheets only for resistors ).If you liked the instructable please vote for me in the storage contest.

P.S.- English isn't my first language so I'm sorry about any grammar or spelling mistakes.

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    2 Discussions

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    seamster

    2 months ago

    This is a pretty clever way to make a custom storage solution. Nice work!

    1 reply