Flip Top Planer Stand

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About: DIY Montreal is all about woodworking & DIY projects. I post how-to videos on my YouTube channel, as well as step-by-step tutorials on my website www.diymontreal.com. Builds include mainly woodshop proje...

If you’re like me, you have limited space for tools in your workshop, aka garage. What can I say, I love tools, but my single car garage has gotten so cramped, I can barely move around, let alone find room to build something. I desperately need to do something to save some space and optimize the layout.

A simple solution I came across is a flip top tool stand, that allows you to store 2 tools in the space of 1, all while making them easily accessible and ease to use when you need them.

This design was inspired by Brad at FixThisBuildThat and he's got plans available for this build if you're interested. Get the PLANS from FixThisBuildThat HERE (specs may vary).

My stand's dimensions were intended to accommodate a Dewalt DW735 planer and a Ridgid oscillating spindle sander.

Step 1: Gather the Hardware

This planer stand has a super solid locking system that's easy to make, and I'll show you how.

Here is the hardware you'll need:

Step 2: Assemble Cabinet

Start by cutting down some 3/4 plywood:

  • 2 equally sized pieces that will be used for the side panels
  • 4 equally sized pieces that will be all the horizontal pieces (bottom, shelf, platform faces)

Drill pocket holes into the side edges of the bottom and shelf pieces. Attach the bottom to both side panels using pocket screws.

Then cut some spacer blocks to prop the shelf into place, and screw it to the side panels from underneath using more pocket screws.

Lastly, cut a piece for the back and secure with pocket screws.

Step 3: Make Drawer

To make a really simple no frills drawer, cut 4 pieces of plywood to make a box that will be 1/8" smaller than the height, width and depth of the opening. No slides are necessary, not even a drawer face.

Use your table saw to cut a shallow groove in all 4 pieces in order to accommodate a drawer bottom.

Then, using pocket screws, assemble 3 sides, but slide in the drawer bottom before attaching the 4th side.

Step 4: Prep Sides for Hardware

Start by tracing a line 2 inches down from the top of each side panel. It helps to lay the cabinet on its side for this step.

Find the center of the line and drill a hole using a 3/4 Forstner bit. This will accommodate the steel pipe that rotates the tabletop.

Use a 5/16 drill bit to drill a hole on the line, 1-1/2" in from the edge. Do this on both the front and back edges. With a square, extend the sides of the hole to the edge of the plywood and use a jigsaw to cut out a notch.

Oh and while the cabinet is on its side, it's a good time to mount the 3" locking caster wheels using some #14 3/4 screws.

Step 5: Build Platform

Grab one of those 4 pieces you cut at the first step for the platform.

Cut 4 pieces of 1x2 pine that are the same width as the platform.

Lay the plywood board flat and find the center line front to back, then measure 3/8" on each side. Butt a piece of 1x2 pine up to each of these lines and screw them down using 1-1/4" wood screws (first drill countersunk pilot holes). This will be the nook for the steel pipe.

The other 2 pine pieces need a notch cut out of the ends. Make a simple jig that will ride along your table saw’s fence to make a 5/16 notch in the center of the boards, that’s 1-½ inch deep. Then screw these pieces down flush with the outside edges of the plywood.

Complete the perimeter by adding more 1x2 pieces all around.

Before sealing up the platform, it’s important to add blocking underneath the tools you'll be mounting so you'll have something to screw into. You want to make sure to line up the blocks under the smaller holes if you’re using screws, the bigger holes are if you’re using bolts.

Seal up the platform with the other piece of plywood using 1-1/4" screws.

Step 6: Assemble Hardware

For each corner of the platform, do the following to assemble the hardware:

  1. Mark 1 inch in from each edge using a combination square.
  2. Make a recessed hole using a Forstner bit, approx. 1/2 inch deep. Do this on both the top an bottom sides of the platform.
  3. Drill a hole through the center using a 3/8 bit.
  4. Insert the head of the eyebolt into the cavity.
  5. Slip a 3/8 washer into the recessed hole, followed by a 3/8 hex bolt.
  6. Slip another 3/8 washer onto the end of the bolt from underneath.
  7. Add a 3/8 nut.
  8. Slip a fender (or regular) 5/16 washer onto the eyebolt, followed by a star knob.

Step 7: Mount Platform

Mount the platform onto the base by threading the 3/4" steel pipe through the hole in the side panel and the cavity in the platform.

Cut down the excess steel pipe using a hack saw, leaving 1/2" protruding from each side.

Use a 3/4 Forstner bit to make a recess into a set of plywood blocks, 1/2 deep. Mount these blocks over the pipe ends and screw them to the cabinet using 1-1/4" screws.

Step 8: Mount Tools

Mount the tools using 3-1/2" screws (smaller holes) or lag screws (larger holes), centering the tool front to back.

For cord management, I used a piece of leather with a pressure snap that I screwed to the platform. This will be a quick and easy way to keep the cord secured and out of the way.

Now, let me tell you, the first time I flipped the tools over I was pretty nervous! The planer alone weighs about 90 lbs… But all my fears melted away when I saw how smoothly the platform rotated and a new tool magically bobbed into place.

_________________________

If you haven't already, be sure to check out the video. If you like what you see, subscribe to my YouTube channel to get notified when I post new project videos.

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33 Discussions

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JT Woodworks

Tip 5 days ago

This is a great space saving solution. You can increase stablity by doubling up on the two plywood sheets that make up the sides.

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JeffM15

7 days ago

Very nice!! Great Instructable.

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patrick1425

7 days ago

Agree with all of the others!!! This is a great video. I've been intimidated to make this... not anymore. I'll get you pictures when I'm done.

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brewerg

8 days ago

Great looking stand. Good job. With 100lb plus perched about 3 ft off the floor, is the unit stable in a side to side direction? i.e. is there much movement if a load is applied to one of the side walls?

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diymontrealbrewerg

Reply 7 days ago

Can't say I've tried, but why would you push against the side walls? There's some minor sway, but nowhere near the point of failure.

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brewergdiymontreal

Reply 7 days ago

Excellent, was a little concerned that a 100lb plus weight supported essentially by 2 off 3/4 ply sides may deflect. Pleased to hear only minor deflections.

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Jedi008

Tip 8 days ago on Step 7

To install the top by yourself, flip the whole cabinet upside down and then insert the pipe. This looks like a great build - I am going to try it!

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KenF9

8 days ago

I really like the concept, but a cut sheet would be very helpful with a caveat that adjustments may have to be made depending on the size of one's planer.

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diymontrealfitzgeraldl

Reply 7 days ago

Yep, we both based our builds off of Brad's design from FixThisBuildThat.

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FerretPD

9 days ago

I've been wanting to do this...but I couldn't figure out an easy way to keep all the Sanding Disks and throat plates in place....how are you managing that?

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Yonatan24FerretPD

Reply 9 days ago

Make storage for the sandpaper on the side of the cart?

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diymontrealYonatan24

Reply 7 days ago

Haha! Sorry to disappoint, I just hadn't made it that far yet. I actually forgot all the sanding accessories on the tool the first time I flipped it... you can imagine.
Nice tip for the feed tables!

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diymontrealFerretPD

Reply 9 days ago

That’s what the drawer is for! I keep all the accessories, extra sand paper and even my planer’s infeed/outfeed tables in the bottom drawer.

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FerretPDdiymontreal

Reply 8 days ago

*laffs* ...I noticed in the mounting Pic you still had all the accessories in the Sander....I thought you'd come up with some brilliant method of keeping them in...outside storage was the solution I was coming to, as-well! Great build!

P.S. I couldn't live without my feed tables mounted...I angle-cut a piece of PVC & glued a magnet in it, & mounted that under the exhaust port to keep the Outfeed Table folded up when it's stored (I'm using a Delta Universal Rolling stand right now)

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RC41

8 days ago on Step 2

Very nice. I built one some years ago out of metal to mount my planner and miter saw. The pivot bolts are a great idea for locking the table in. I ended up using a locking pin on mine.

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justiniano

8 days ago on Introduction

You are a pro builder congratulations Look very nice God bless.

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cdavenport

9 days ago

Excellent tutorial! So refreshing to see women in the profession!