Giant Gee Haw Whimmy Diddle

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About: Professionally I have been a summer camp counselor, a Draftsman/designer, salesperson, bicycle mechanic, laminate flooring machine mechanic, teacher, and designer of the OP Loftbed. Personally I am a human...

A classic American toy. Whimmy Diddle, Whammy Diddle, or Hoey Stick, whatever you call it they are all cool. There are some great Instructables on how to make Gee Haw Whimmy Diddles.

like crrdlx's https://www.instructables.com/id/I-Have-a-Whammy-D...

and savvas_papasavva's https://www.instructables.com/id/Native-American-T...

Phil B's https://www.instructables.com/id/Whittled-Hooey-St...

and even a lazer cut version by masynmachien https://www.instructables.com/id/Hooey-Stick/

I decided to make mine different by scaling it up... way up. I had a 70+ year old oak tree get waterlogged roots and blow over by a recent storm. I am going to make some other things out of it, but first I couldn't resist trying to make a giant Gee Haw Whimmy Diddle. Plus I thought it would be good to enter in the Big And Small Contest!

Step 1: Warning! Danger! Caution!

There are many ways to get hurt making a Giant Gee Haw Whimmy Diddle. Falling trees, Exploding Chainsaws, Burning Limbs, and Sonic Booms....just to name a few. Do not try this Instructable.

Step 2: Safety Equipment

If you are going to ignore the previous safety warning, you will at least need to wear some protective equipment. I wore earplugs, safety glasses, leather gloves, long pants, and steel toe boots.

Step 3: Tools

I used a chainsaw to make all the cuts and a brace and bits to make the holes. I used a small log to hammer in the nine inch nail mainly because it was close and I had left the hammer in the garage.

Step 4: Materials

I used an oak tree that had fallen over but was still off the ground. The only item I did buy was one nine inch nail, for the axle of the propeller.

Step 5: Cut the Notches

I cut 21 notches in the tree. The exact number is not important, it just happened to be how many I cut. I cut them at an angle of about 45 degrees. When you rub a stick on the notches, it vibrates the log and makes the propeller spin.

Step 6: Measuring the Notches

I thought I would mention how I measured the spacing for the notches. All I did was use the width of the chainsaw bar to measure and mark the spaces. Sometimes people get all caught up on measuring exactly. Sometime exact measurements are important, but sometimes something simple works the best. And then no one argues over whether inches are better or if we should all use metric.

Step 7: Making the Propeller

I made two different propellers. The larger propeller I made out of a section of tree about six inches in diameter and two feet long. I tried to make it a bit fancy and slim in the middle. It seamed a bit heavy, so I made a smaller, more simple propeller out of a section three inches in diameter.

Step 8: Drilling the Hole in the Propeller

The hole in the propellers has to be bigger than the nine inch nail diameter. It has to let the propeller spin freely on the nine inch nail. You want the hole to be as close to the balance point as you can get it.

Step 9: Drilling the Hole for the Nine Inch Nail

The hole in the end of the log has to be about the same diameter as the nine inch nail and not too deep. You want the nine inch nail to be able to be hammered a little way into the tree and still leave room for the propeller to spin.

Step 10: Attaching the Propeller

I put the propeller on with the nine inch nail. I hammered it in softly using the small propeller. After unsuccessful attempts to make the large propeller work, I used the large propeller as a slide hammer to pull out the nine inch nail and then attached the smaller propeller.

Step 11: Using the Giant Gee Haw Whimmy Diddle

I tried with a smaller log and large propeller. I was unsuccessful with that combination, so I switched to a smaller propeller and a large log to rub the notches. The large log was so heavy and cumbersome that I was only able to push it one direction at a time. I was able to get a partial rotation out of the propeller and believe that if I had the help of a few more people that we could maintain some rotation of the propeller. The Giant Gee Haw Whimmy Diddle is more of a novelty proof of concept and I see it's future being re purposed into a green wood working draw horse.

Step 12: Video

As usual, I made a video.

Thank you for watching. I hope you enjoy.

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    32 Discussions

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    jeanniel1

    2 months ago

    I know the smaller version of this, but - hey, go big or go home, right? LOL

    2 replies
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    CHARLESCRANFORDjeanniel1

    Reply 2 months ago

    The normal versions are much easier to make. This one wore me out. I am thinking the next might be not as big. Thank you for the comment.

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    jeanniel1CHARLESCRANFORD

    Reply 2 months ago

    I can well imagine - but I love that you did it BIG just to show it can work

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    CHARLESCRANFORDjimvandamme

    Reply 4 months ago

    Thank you for the comment. My favorite is Hayseed Dixie.Their first album was a bluegrass tribute to ACDC.

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    chuckstake

    5 months ago

    did not know what it was but love it may make a small one to start

    1 reply
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    CHARLESCRANFORDchuckstake

    Reply 5 months ago

    Whimmy Diddles are fun and great conversation starters. Good luck making one.

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    ndr1968

    5 months ago

    Oh Man! What a gyp!

    You should'a at least went inside, had a cup of coffee and came back out made made it work! What a lousy gyp!

    Just kidding! <grin> Great use of materials at hand for and wasting a morning!

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    CHARLESCRANFORDndr1968

    Reply 5 months ago

    I was disappointed as well. What you did not see in the video, was the part that I pulled something in my knee, while moving the larger log. I am just now able to walk without it hurting. Once my knee gets better and I get some friends over, we are giving it another try. As far as a waste of time, I got to spend time outside and I was able to make a video and an Instructable to provide some entertainment for a few people, so not a total waste. Thank you for your comment.

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    lmwhitmo

    5 months ago

    Have you tried stomping and yelling hooey? I always say that if it's not working, then you're not stomping hard enough! ;)

    Great video, brought back some awesome memories from my boy scout camp days.

    1 reply
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    CHARLESCRANFORDlmwhitmo

    Reply 5 months ago

    It is like an inside joke, that you hate, until you are in on the joke. Thank you for the comment.

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    jkimball

    5 months ago

    This is ridiculous and I support you in this.

    1 reply
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    dragon flyer

    5 months ago

    That's hilarious! I'd never even heard of a Gee Haw Whimmy Diddle before and just came to check that out, but got mesmerized into reading/viewing the whole thing. I hope you'll post another video when you and your brother-in-law get it working properly!

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    CHARLESCRANFORDdragon flyer

    Reply 5 months ago

    I will try and make another video. I am also thinking of making something else out of the log, once I am done experimenting with the whimmy diddle. Thank you for the comment and keep watching for more to come.

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    dirtboy4x

    5 months ago

    It may have worked if you would have tried moving the vibrator log in one direction only: one way for clockwise, the opposite rub for counterclockwise. You were rubbing it back and forth, which probably cancelled the direction the propeller was trying to rotate.

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    CHARLESCRANFORDdirtboy4x

    Reply 5 months ago

    Thank you for your comment. This would be a good suggestion, if that was the way the gee and the haw work, but they are not. Part of the problem may be that I can not keep my thumb and pointer finger on opposite sides of the whimmy diddle.

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    thurtado

    5 months ago

    Nice job! No doubt a fun way to relive a bit of your childhood. Kudos, man!

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    CHARLESCRANFORDthurtado

    Reply 5 months ago

    Thank you for the comment. Every time I play with a chainsaw, it is like I am reliving my childhood, even that time I had to go to the emergency room.

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    ventifact

    5 months ago on Step 12

    I hope you realize this is a technique for attracting giant earthworms, be careful.