How to Make Flatcap

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Introduction: How to Make Flatcap

About: We are dedicated to providing quality DIY projects for all skill levels.

Printable pattern available!

Step 1: Video Tutorial

Detailed video tutorial to help visualize the process if you get stuck on a step!

Step 2: List of Supplies

Here is a list of supplies you will need to help with the making of this cap.

***Supply Links***
-LINK to Buy Pattern: http://capsupplyco.com/index.php?rout...

-LINK to Buy Sewing machine Singer 4423 https://goo.gl/33eHF8

-LINK to Buy Polyester/Cotton Twill Fabric By The Yard Here: https://goo.gl/33eHF8

-LINK to Buy Bias tape folder attachment: https://goo.gl/33eHF8

-LINK to Buy Bias Tape: https://goo.gl/33eHF8

Step 3: Print/Cut Pattern

First you will need to print and cut out your pattern.

-The top section will need to be taped on the portion indicated on the pattern.

(If you are not using the pattern provided then feel free to skip ahead.)

Step 4: Cutting Outer Fabric

Top Panel

-Place the top panel on the fabric fold.

-Trace around from top to bottom.

-Pattern indicated where to stop on the fold

-Once traced. Cut out.

Side Panel

-Place straight end of panel on the fabric fold.

-Trace and cut.

Unfold both panels and move to next step.

Step 5: Applying Interfacing​

-Place fusible interfacing over the panels.

-Wrong side of the panels should be facing the adhesive side of the interfacing.

-Take iron and apply heat to the panels. Avoid hitting the table surface.

-We used paper to help with this process. The iron we used was to hot at the lowest setting and melted the interfacing. We solved this by adding a piece of paper between the iron and interfacing.

-Iron and let sit until the adhesive is try.

-Once the interfacing is ready cut our the panels.

Step 6: Sew Top Panel Opening

-Take top panel back V shaped opening. Place right sides together and sew.

-We used about .25 seam allowance for this particular pattern. Keep this in mind for the entire pattern.

-Flip right side out and top stitch.

Step 7: Pinning Top and Side Panels

-Fold the top and side panel in half.

-Find the center and mark it with chalk.

-Place pin on front center and both ends.

Step 8: Sewing Top to Side

-After pinning start sewing.

-We recommend starting from the front center and working toward the outside edge. Then repeat this stitch for the other half.

Step 9: Twin Needle/Bias Tape Setup

-Place the twin needle into the domestic machine.

-Switch machine to zigzag stitch with 0 width.

-Add folder on to the machine. We used tape because our folder is designed for a industrial sewing machine.

-Links for the different types of folders are in the above supply list.

-Thread the machine with two spools of thread and you are good to go!

-You totally can just top stitch this seam like normal. We use the bias tape for a more professional finish.

Step 10: Trim and Add Bias Tape

-If you are using the bias tape method.

-Trim the access fabric from seam.

-Cut bias tape to the needs of folder.

-Place bias tape in the folder and start stitching.

-Be sure to stay in the center of the seam. This will add a nice top stitch on each side of the seam. Giving your flatcap a professional look.

-Make sure to cut the bias tape long enough to make it all the way around the cap.

Step 11: Preparing Brim

-Place the brim you are using onto the fabric.

-Trace the front curve.

-Stitch directly on the trace.

-Cut about .25 inches from the seam.

-Flip sleeve right side out and insert the brim.

-Use zipper or narrow presser foot to sew along the back edge of the brim.

-This will lock the brim into position and tighten the fabric.

Step 12: Brim Stitch

-When the brim is sew into the sleeve.

-Stitch on top of the brim near the outside edge. This will secure the fabric even more onto the brim.

-Cut back access fabric about .5 inches from the brim.

Step 13: Attaching Crown to Brim

-Make front center of top crown and back center of brim.

-Place right sides together and sew from the center towards the outside edges.

-This will help keep the brim in the center of the crown.

Step 14: Locking Top to Brim

-Grab the center of the top crown and middle of the top brim with fingers.

-Flip inside out and place a tack stick in that location. This adds that tradition flatcap look in front.

-Feel free to sew further across the front. Locking it down to the brim. It is really up to you and the look you are trying to create.

Step 15: Sew Lining

-The lining is sewn the exact same way at the outer top and side panels.

-Pin and sew. DO NOT add top stitching or bias tape!

Step 16: Adding Lining to Cap

-Place the lining and the outer layer wrong sides together.

-Align the back seams.

-Sew all the way around the bottom edge with about .25 seam allowance.

Step 17: Attaching Sweatband

-Take the sweatband and place it on the back middle seam. Wrong side of the sweatband to the right side of the crown.

-Use a zipper/narrow presser foot and start sewing around the bottom attaching the sweatband. Keep as close to the edge of the sweatband as possible.

-You can also make your own sweatbands by folding fabric in half or you can buy premade professional ones at capsupplyco.com

-When you near the end. Fold the end of the sweatband under so you have a finished edge. Sew through and you are all done!

Step 18: Thank You!

Thank you for checking out our instructable! Be sure to follow for more in the future! If you get stuck on any step check out the video. It will help you get a visualization of the sewing process.

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    14 Discussions

    This is so cool! I've been wanting to make a cap like this for a long time but I want to start from more scratch than this. Spin the wool into yarn, weave it into the fabric, cut out the pattern and hand sew it together. My plan may be a bit more involved but I am so glad to see someone else do it and how the pieces fit together. It may take a while to do it but I will try to share the results. Thanks for giving me some inspiration and impetus. Great job!

    Very nicely done...I used to make caps like these for myself, my husband, and son. They are versatile, useful, and comfortable to wear. "Buckram" is a heavy starched interfacing used in the hat making industry for stiffened areas such as the brim. It should be a product that is available from better fabric shops or specialty supply houses. Thanks for posting...voted for you!

    Very nice cap, and great video! I've been wanting to make one of these for each of the men in my life - you can't buy them for less than about $40 ! A great source for nice woolen or wool blend fabrics at a cheap price is men's sport coats or suit jackets from thrift stores! ( I especially like the stores run by churches or hospitals.) If you take them apart carefully (the jackets, not the stores) you can recycle the interfacing, lining, buttons, collar binding, etc.

    1 reply

    We apologize for the link troubles. We are ahead of schedule with the release of this tutorial. Capsupplyco will be adding all type of cap supplies in the very near future. If you need brims you can email them. They have flat cap brims in stock at the moment. Hopefully this helps with the miss understanding. Thank you so much for checking out our tutorial!

    I’ve been sewing for many many years and I have never seen this done. This is totally cool! I want to make this flat cap now! Beautiful job and great tutorial!

    How do you size the hat from young boys to adults?

    Sounds cool - I love flat caps/cabbie caps. But a few things missing - where does one get brims? And the fact that the place that sells the pattern directs you to the video by this maker to figure out how to make it is... Weird. The place that sells the pattern has all the components to make baseball caps, but not flat caps (that I could find). Some are useable for both, but not brims.
    I do really want to make my own flat caps, but I'll have to do some more digging first.

    This is BRILLIANT! Thank you for a terrific tutorial!

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    martee

    Question 5 months ago

    Very nice, good work ! Have you got the link to the specific pattern you used in this instructables ? I couldn't find it on capsupplyco ...

    Ok so, I love this question so I went to do a bit of research (aka Googling). Wikipedia states that flat caps were common in the working class. So what I'm *guessing* is that they wanted something with a brim to keep out the sun but not a lot of material so it wouldn't be expensive. This is just an inference though, I would love to find out the real reason behind it.

    Is the brim something I should buy or can I make one? And also where could I buy one? and How could I make one?

    This is so cool, totally a summer project!

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    gralan

    5 months ago

    Great tutorial, wonderful pictures, and I dig the hat.