How to Propagate a Pothos Plant

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About: I work at instructables by day, and turn into a stitch witch by night. follow me on instagram @jessyratfink to see what i'm working on! ^_^

If you're got an overgrown pothos plant or are looking for an easy way to get more plants, propagation via cuttings if the best way to go! In this instructable I'll show you how to trim your pothos plant, take cuttings, root the cuttings in water, and how to plant the pothos cuttings and take care of them.

I love this method of pothos propagation because it is super easy - all you need is some time and glasses of water!

Step 1: Tools for Propagating a Pothos

Thankfully, you don't need much!

  • Sharp scissors or an x-acto knife
  • Glasses full of water to hold cuttings
  • Pot for planting
  • Indoor or all-purpose potting soil for planting

Step 2: Trim Your Pothos Plant

As you can see, my plant was getting a little out of control. I had to wind its vines into the other pothos nearby to keep them up and away from my cats. It was actually as long as I am tall!

First things first: time for a trim! Decide how long you'd like the vines to be and trim them directly below the lowest leaf node you want to leave. Untangle the vines and lay them out individually to get ready to make some cuttings!

Step 3: Cut the Pothos Stems Into Individual Nodes

Now it's time to dismantle the pothos stems into individual cuttings. Some folks like to root a whole stem, but I find that takes a very long time and often doesn't produce a plant that transfers easily back to soil after being in water so long.

Instead, I cut along the stem to create individual leaf cuttings. Cut to the left and right of every leaf stem, leaving a small piece of vine attached to the bottom of the leaf stem. See the little brown bumps on the vine? Those are called nodes, and that's where new roots will form.

Step 4: Place the Pothos Stems in Water and Wait

I use small juice glasses for this, but have a look around and see what fits your pothos cuttings best!

Fill your container(s) with water and place the cuttings into the water so the cut ends remain submerged.

Place the cuttings in a warm, bright spot and leave them to grow roots. Check on the cuttings every couple of days and dump out the old water and replace it with new. (Oxygen dissolves in standing water after a time, so it's important to refresh!)

Step 5: How to Know When Your Pothos Cuttings Are Ready to Plant

I always leave my pothos cuttings in water until they have at least one inch of roots. In this case, I ended up with much longer ones waiting for more of the cuttings to root, so the roots are between two and three inches.

Keep in mind that the longer the roots remain in water, the harder it will be for them to make the change to soil. It's better to plant some of the cuttings while waiting for the rest. :)

Sort your cuttings and remove the cuttings with roots from the water. Cuttings without roots can remain in water until they form roots - some can take quite a while!

Step 6: Planting and Growing the Pothos Cuttings

Fill a pot about 2/3 full with fresh potting soil and start placing the cuttings around the edges of the pot, adding soil as necessary to keep the cuttings in the right place. Then fill in the middle of the pot with cuttings and add more soil as needed.

Water slowly and thoroughly, until the water runs out the bottom of the pot. Once it stops dripping, place the pot where you want it to live and care for it like a normal pothos. Congrats! You just propagated a pothos. :D

2 People Made This Project!

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23 Discussions

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R ‘n’ W

14 days ago

If you have a fishtank you can put them at the surface of the water with a suction cup or something different. The nutrients in the water will help the plant grow. You can even
let it be inside the tank when it’s bigger. The plant doesn’t need substrate at all and it’s great for the water quality as it kills nitrates.

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cneibarger

3 months ago

You think yours are out of control? Get a load of my tangled mess... Got the plant (and another unknown vineing plant) as a housewarming gift 7 yrs ago and just do my best to keep it above cat's reach... I think its doing more than surviving, its thriving! Lol! Question... A lot of my plant is empty vine. When I begin to untangle and prune, have you noticed if leaves and nodes from the tips grow better or ones closer to the soil end of the vine?

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mrl7635cneibarger

Reply 15 days ago

I've heard if you trim them, from the tip side, they will get thicker. I haven't tried it yet.

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KatyM43

22 days ago

How long does it take for the leaves to grow more leaves? Or do the these single leaf cuttings grow into vines?

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jessyratfinkKatyM43

Reply 21 days ago

I'd say between a few weeks and a couple months! It can be a pretty slow process if they aren't in the right conditions.

Each of the cuttings should continue to grow additional leaves, letting it grow into a longer vine!

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ArethaR1

5 weeks ago on Step 2

My daughter, bless her heart, gave me cuttings from a pothos she has and placed the cuttings in potting soil. When I got home, I removed them from the soil, as I'm not used to propagating in that way, place them in water and all but 1 withered and died. The surviving leaf has quite a long root now. I'd like to see if I'll have luck placing "little baby" in a small clay pot w/soil. What do you all think?

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jessyratfinkArethaR1

Reply 4 weeks ago

I'd definitely give it a try! Though I'd recommend avoiding a clay pot - it may dry out too quickly for the pothos. Plastic or glazed ceramic would be best :)

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ChloeJ13

2 months ago

hi i was recently sent a satin pothos in the post but when it arrived all the roots were poking out and it had obviously been disturbed quite a lot through the moving around. i took the plant out and put the soil back in and replanted so roots were below soil but it’s roots are all varying in size but mainly quite short. it’s in a 12cm width pot and 10cm depth. i watered it and then noticed this morning after a week and a bit it’s still really soggy where the roots aren’t long enough to get the roots water from the rest of the soil. i’m a bit of a plant newbie and really don’t want it to die, should i re pot it into a smaller pot? and i’m currently using houseplant mix is this ok for it? i refreshed the soil again this morning as the bottom half was so soggy and the corners of the plant are getting brown and crispy :( help please! thank you x

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jessyratfinkChloeJ13

Best Answer 2 months ago

That pot size is good for small plants! Does it have a drainage hole? That could be the problem - pothos don't like to sit in soggy soil for a long time.

The other issue may be that the plant is in shock. Shipping will stress it as will replanting, and it can take a little while for a plant to recover. My suggestion is to make sure the pot has a drainage hole (houseplant mix is fine - just don't pack it down into the pot really firmly, you can damage the roots) and to water it just until the water runs out the bottom. Place it next to a sunny window and let the soil dry out almost completely before watering again. Stick your finger down into it to check.

Let me know how it goes and feel free to upload a photo if you're still having problems :)

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samfxr

2 months ago on Step 6

When you trim the plant for the cuttings, does the cut vine continue to grow, or is it stunted?

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jessyratfinksamfxr

Best Answer 2 months ago

It will continue to grow! Sometimes you may even get 2 new vines growing from the cut. :)

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Jack of Most Trades

3 months ago

Those little jars that Dannon "French Style" yogurt come in make great rooting jars. I didn't know you propagate from a little snip of stem with a node. Now I'll have more success with my vines.

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amcgamcg

3 months ago on Introduction

Thanks! My mum used to propagate all sorts of plants, and very quickly too. Her "trick"?: she always cut the leaves with very little or no stems attached, and placed them in twos, one facing the other, in warm compost that she kept moist and sunlit.The "twosomes" grew roots very quickly, and she said they liked to be with siblings!

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Rae1929

7 months ago

Thank you so much for this. My pathos plant needs help and this sounds like just the ticket!

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Huniblue

10 months ago

I’m so excited to have found this. My 13-year-old granddaughter will be spending a few days with me next week. I’ve been looking for fun & educational projects for us. My pothos needs a good trimming, so this is perfect. Thanks!

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MadeByBarb

11 months ago

Interesting... I'm wondering if spring/summer is the best time for this. It would be great if I could get them going outdoors!

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jessyratfinkMadeByBarb

Reply 11 months ago

Mine have definitely grown roots quicker when it's warmer. The ones I started over the winter went sooooooo slow. :)

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CapnChkn

11 months ago

I was about to say! Water roots are different from soil roots. I would have suggested the cuttings be placed in sterile starter mix.

Moisten the mix and place it in a roasting pan or something oven safe. Moisten the mix and set the oven to the lowest temperature, place the soil, in the covered pan, in the oven until the soil temperature reaches 165°F for 20 minutes.

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Kink Jarfold

11 months ago on Step 6

I've always liked the coloring of these plants. Nice How To post. Kudos. Also, cute moniker. Your pictures cannot hide that impish sense of humor of yours.

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RaasAlHayya

11 months ago

Now I understand why my cuttings never survived...thank you! :D