How to Repair the Macbook Pro Logic Board at Home

Introduction: How to Repair the Macbook Pro Logic Board at Home

A Logic board failure (computer doesn't start, black screen) is a very common failure of (old) macbook pros. The repair costs are way higher (around 600$) than what a used non broken mac is worth. Therefore, I decided to use this method to repair my 2008 macbook pro. It worked out well. However, I do not assume any responsibility if something goes wrong using this guide.

All you need is

Teacher Notes

Teachers! Did you use this instructable in your classroom?
Add a Teacher Note to share how you incorporated it into your lesson.

Step 1: Open the Top Case

  1. open the top case - you will need a torx °6 screw driver and a small Philips screwdriver

Step 2: Remove the Logic Board

2. Remove the logic board, again you will need a torx °6 and small Philips screw driver

3. Clean the logic board (remove also the thermal compound)

Step 3: Bake It!

4. put the logic board on aluminum foil pillars

5. preheaten the (kitchen) oven to 220°C / 428°F with air circulation

6. put the logic board in the oven, turn the temperature to 200°C / 392°F with air circulation

7. After 7 minutes turn the oven off and open it a bit

8. put new thermal compound on the cooling

9. after the logic board has cooled down, take it out of the oven

Step 4: Reassemble

10. install the logic board

11. put on the top case again

8 People Made This Project!

Recommendations

  • Backyard Contest

    Backyard Contest
  • Silly Hats Speed Challenge

    Silly Hats Speed Challenge
  • Finish It Already Speed Challenge

    Finish It Already Speed Challenge

66 Discussions

0
WillW36
WillW36

4 years ago

This is such nonsense, solder does not melt at 350 degrees. You might fix your board temporarily but this is not a permanent fix.

Take it to someone who knows what they are doing.

0
raphan
raphan

Reply 4 months ago

No, not since the 80s where lead was forbidden in solder's paste, it was supposed to lower the melting temp and it did ! But since manufacturers found new alloys where the melting temperature is lower than 220°C, otherwise CMos components would burn.

0
JuanC222
JuanC222

Reply 3 years ago

yeah and they'll charge you an arm and a leg. just dump the thing and move on.

0
mdshann
mdshann

Reply 4 years ago

I'm not saying that this is a good idea, but it can work. Solder melts at lower temperatures that what he says to set the oven to. (428 preheat 392 bake)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solder

0
sueget
sueget

Question 10 months ago

Do you need to use a convection oven? I figure that is what you mean by air circulation. I have a non-conviction oven.

0
ptero6000
ptero6000

1 year ago

It worked! I was ready to recycle my late 2011 15" Macbook when I came across this method. Apple certified repair estimate was $750. The only mistake I made was breaking the wire to the speaker (I pried when I should have slid). The speakers don't work but can still use external speaker and headphones. I found a couple of other YouTube videos to clarify some of the instruction. I used a long cool down in the oven with the door ajar.

0
Wally_J
Wally_J

1 year ago

Where will we need to put the thermal compound? I know what it is, but not sure where it goes, in Step 8.

1
ptero6000
ptero6000

Reply 1 year ago

I suggest searching on youtube on how to replace thermal compound for your particular model and year of laptop as it will vary.

0
IkaiK
IkaiK

Question 1 year ago

Can someone explain to me in detail on how and why this works? Are there any risks into doing this? I don't know much about this, so keep that in mind. Thanks in advance.

0
ChristophE6
ChristophE6

1 year ago

It worked?! It worked!!
Did this “repair” on 10-20-2018, on my 2011 MBP 15” with success. One thing to note is that some flux bubbled out from under the AMD chip after about 3 minutes and continued until I opened the oven door slightly.

FEEB3E14-44B6-4F61-A34B-CD3BDD70A696.jpegA00C8438-20F3-4C67-8A67-F7ABC174756E.jpeg
0
madtube
madtube

Reply 1 year ago

I also have a Late-2011 MBP15. At this point, it’s either do this, shell out $500 for a logic board out of a Mid-2012 to swap, or buy a new one. Any pointers I should be aware of?

0
ChristophE6
ChristophE6

Reply 1 year ago

Not really anything extra to be aware of. I followed the instructions exactly. Just make sure you note all the ribbon cable locations and screws etc etc. take a photo before you take it all apart. The logic board balancing on the aluminum foil legs is pretty wobbly... if you think up a way to keep it more stable that’s the only thing extra I’d say. But I was pleasantly surprised this worked :-) Makes sense tho, reflowing solder on the surface mount components is a practice they use in industry... so... why not at home.

0
johnthethird
johnthethird

Question 1 year ago on Step 2

Can I get a little instruction on how to clean the logic board and remove the compound? Also need to know how to apply new compound. I've got a late 2011 15" Macbook pro. Thank you!

1
PMAZ7
PMAZ7

Answer 1 year ago

Just simple rubbing alcohol and a paper towel. Be sure not to leave any paper fibers behind. New compound will go between the cooling rails and chips. Just a pea sized bit.

0
JohannesM17
JohannesM17

2 years ago

Worked for a late 2011 macbook pro with horizontal stripes and crash on boot. Set the oven to 175° Celsius 7 Minutes and long slow cool down period with opened and turned off oven

0
johnthethird
johnthethird

Reply 1 year ago

Great to hear it worked! I have the same computer. Can you tell me how you cleaned the logic board and removed the old thermal compound? Also how you applied the new compound. Thank you!

0
captnkirk
captnkirk

Reply 1 year ago

The thermal paste helps to carry the heat away from the three main computer chips on the lower side of the logic board onto a thermal pipe, which is then cooled by the fans on the right and left side of the logic board.

You can get this stuff at Radio Shack, or other places that sell electronics hobbyist supplies.


You will need to clean off the dried thermal compound that is on the 3 main computer chips on the lower side of the logic board, before you put it in the oven.

Before putting the logic board back into the case, you should clean off the dried thermal compound on the 3 rectangular plates located on the heat pipe that runs along the back of the lower inside of case.

You will want to add some fresh thermal paste to these 3 rectangular plates, before you place the logic board back into place.

0
captnkirk
captnkirk

1 year ago

I am totally impressed ! I tried this fix tonight on an early-2008 MacBook Pro 15" that had died 4 years ago and was sitting in my garage. I had decided to give this beast one last chance before I threw it out, and I am glad that I did.

It took a little bit of work to get all of the connectors off the logic board. I cleaned it up and then put it in a preheated oven at 425˚F for 10 minutes. Then I turned off the oven and opened the door a crack to let it cool down. I later put it back into the chassis and reconnected all of the connectors and turned on the power. AND IT WORKS AGAIN !

Now I need to get some thermal paste for the heatsinks on the 3 major computer chips on the lower side, before I screw everything down and close it up.

Brilliant solution. Thank you very much !!!

0
BillyA41
BillyA41

1 year ago on Introduction

I tried it and about halfway through all I could think was what am I doing right now. I continued letting it bake for the full 7 minutes, reassembled, and I couldn’t believe that it booted up. Couldn’t be happier.