LED'S on 220V AC GRID 7-8 WATTS ONLY

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About: student of electrical engineering.

IN THIS INSTRUCTABLE I WILL TELL U HOW TO MAHE AN EFFICIENT LIGHT CONSISTS OF LED'S THAT ARE COMMONLY RUN ON DC CIRCUIT.
HERE IT WILL WORK ON 220 V AC FROM GRID
POWER CONSUMPTION IS 7 TO 8 WATT
AND ITS TRANSFORMER LESS.

COMPONENTS:
• Capacitors 2× 0.47uF 275v AC
• Capacitor 1× 10uF 400v AC
• Resistor 1× 10Ω 0.25W
• Resistor 1× 1MΩ 0.25W
• Fuse with holder 1×200ma
• 50×Led’s white 5mm

Hardware and tools required:
• Cable Duct 25×16mm
• Hand hack saw
• Soldering iron
• Drill machine
• Wire cutter
• Steel ruler
• marker
DRILL BIT ACORDING TO LED SIZE

Step 1: STEP 1

1. Get a duct and cut a small piece for 50 led’s depending on design and shape

Step 2: STEP 2

2. Remove its cover

Step 3: STEP 3

 Mark drill Points with marker and steel ruler

Step 4: STEP 4

 Drill Holes on marked points

Step 5: STEP 5

5. Place Led’s in each hole

Step 6: STEP 6

6. Solder led’s all in series

Step 7: STEP 7

7. Solder all other components according to circuit diagram and place them in bottom of duct use 200mA Fuse instead of 1A as in circuit.

Step 8: STEP 8

RUN THE CIRCUIT.

BECAREFULL WHILE USING 220V ITS DANGEROUS IF U ARE NOT PROFFESIONAL
I AM NOT RESPONSABLE FOR ANY DAMAGE .

5 People Made This Project!

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10 Discussions

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PierreV16

1 year ago

Is scheduled 1 amper köprü diyot : what I can find is 1, 5A in 3 different models.

1) Urrm 400V, Urms 280V, Uf 1V, IF 1,5A ,Ir 10µA

2) Urrm 400V, Urms 280V, Uf 1,05V, IF 1,5A, Ir 10µA

3) Urrm 400V,Urms 280V,Uf 1,1V, IF 1,5A, Ir 5µA

Or can it be replaced by something else?

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xgashi

3 years ago

Will be a big help for me if u can explain....the purpose of R2 and using of two capacitors 470nF

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gandresito

4 years ago on Introduction

Hello, could you please tell how to make this 220v 50hz circuit but with 100 or 200 leds at 3v 20mA? I'd really appreciate it!

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btahir90jigneshramani

Reply 4 years ago on Introduction

Dear i didn't measure but it was enough for my study table and hobby table. It mostly depends on the LED you are using. But its enough for small areas.

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jigneshramanibtahir90

Reply 4 years ago on Introduction

ok dear....but can u compare its light with cfl light...i mean how much watt cfl illumination is same as ur led light 's illumination. for example my 12W led lamp has same illumination as 20W cfl.

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btahir90jigneshramani

Reply 4 years ago on Introduction

This 8W led tube is giving the same light as 14W CFL. But as i told you earlier it depends on LED you are using. If you use a high Lumens LED you can get equal to 18W CFL or more Light. Another plus point is that it can work in damp envirment and its age is quite more than CFL.

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GideonW

5 years ago on Introduction

Well it's a risk i prefer not to take, because one day someone else who has less knowledge may be messing with it.

The comment about parallel leds was meant more the moment when one led dies. a configuration like http://www.circuitstoday.com/mains-operated-led-lamp is a bit easier when looking for that one dead led.

But I like the end result of your labor :)

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GideonW

5 years ago on Introduction

If you don't understand why this circuits is very dangerous don't build it. [hint: galvanic isolation]

Wouldn't it be better to wire the LED's in a parallel configuration?

1 reply
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ironsmiterGideonW

Reply 5 years ago on Introduction

parallel would most likely require the use of a transformer.
defeating the second sentence.

by running in this configuration you get pretty darn close to required voltage to each led right from the power line.
220VAC reticified and divided by 50 led = ideally 4.4 volts(220 can range from 200 to 240 volts) which is just about exactly what some of the more powerful bright white leds require. This means you only need the one minimal current limiting resistor. Parallel running circuits require not only a transformer to get close to the correct voltage, but also a current limiting resistor for each led(or series of leds, if run in a parallel/serial configuration)

Isolation would make the circuit much "safer" but we're makers, and accept certain risks when doing it ourselves.
That being said, make sure if you make one of these, to only plug it into a GFCI outlet. And make sure your cable duct is plastic. that will help provide a margin of safety, since there will be no exposed conductive materials.