Mason Jar Planter

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DIY reclaimed wood, indoor planters for your home!

Visit Peaches + Salt for more creative ideas!

Step 1: Get Wood

Dumpster dive or search alleyways to find some reclaimed wood. If that fails, then I suppose you could go to your local hardware store and purchase said wood. You might also want to check Craigslist for wood in the 'free' or 'material' sections.

Depending on how many mason jars you want to add per board, measure appropriately for spacing. Each of my boards were about 40 inches so I separated my jars 8 inches apart and centered them using a ruler and a sharpie.

Step 2: The Foundation

To secure my mason jars, I used metal clamps and mending plates. The mending plates secure the clamps to the board.

First, I marked the center, where the mending plate would be placed. I marked where each plate would drilled into the board using a sharpie. Then I drilled the bottom screw about 3/4 of the way into the board and slid the clamp underneath. Then I drilled the top screw in to secure the clamp. I repeated this until I had secured all of my clamps to the board.

Step 3: Finished Board

Here you can see the clamps and plates screwed into the board.

Step 4: Install Mason Jars

Using the clamps, I attached my mason jars to the piece of wood.

Step 5: Finished Planter

Finally, I put my plants inside each mason jar and then used picture hanging hardware to hang the planter on the wall. This is what your planter will look like when you have finished.

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36 Discussions

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 tpmike

2 years ago

Amazing work...thanks for sharing...

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jdc2450ClaudioDonate

Reply 3 years ago on Introduction

Hey sorry for the very late response, but I just used soil and have been watering maybe once a week. I have now had the plants in regular sized mason jars for almost one year and they are still growing. I would suggest if you wanted larger plants to use the larger mason jars, also adding layers of charcoal and rocks will help. I did that in a later project which you can see if you copy this link http://www.peachesandsalt.com/blog?tag=DIY

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Mkcastillo

3 years ago

This is awesome for none other but looking TOTALLY AWESOME. Its pretty simple....you just dont over water and considering the jar is see through overwatering shouldnt be an issue. The rock idea is cool too. If the roots grow theough the rocks that just makes a much cooler view!!!! Will be making this with the hubby today!!!!!

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jdc2450Mkcastillo

Reply 3 years ago on Introduction

Yeah I have had the plants in for almost a year with no issue, watering them maybe once a week and they are perfect.

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locoblondie

3 years ago on Introduction

that looks amazing I shall use this in the house ill be moving into soon

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Great idea. How do you water them? Since there's no draining holes, just a bit of water so doesn't rot the plant roots? Men, I'm gonna do that! Thanks for the idea, got my vote.

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jdc2450ptuny

Reply 3 years ago on Introduction

I have some plants in mason jars already but they are succulents so they don't require much water. The charcoal idea is great and I might have to add this in. Thanks for the tip!!!

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blomanClaudioDonate

Reply 3 years ago

Drop an ice cube in every few days to maybe a week? The melt time should allow for some absorption

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zackerClaudioDonate

Reply 3 years ago on Introduction

maybe put an inch or so of stones in the bottom so the water can drain from the soil? that'd be my guess... lol

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ClaudioDonatezacker

Reply 3 years ago on Introduction

Even so, the water would have nowhere to go, and the roots will grow up to the stones. I guess that the way is to not over water it, so that evaporation and plant transpiration would take care of eliminating the water. Maybe... I don't know, my thumb is not very green...

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zackerClaudioDonate

Reply 3 years ago on Introduction

I guess how the stones work is you don't use enough water to actually fill up the jar. you use just enough to wet the soil and any little bit more will seep down into the stones and as the soil dries it should wick some moisture back up. if the plants roots grow down into the rocks I don't know what to do...lol cut them? lol or make a hole in the bottom of the top jar so the water can drip into the jar below it and water that plant... lol

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patsheldon

3 years ago on Introduction

This would work great for those who don't have a lot of space, but want to bring some plants in the home! :) Thanks for the share!

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Wired_Mist

3 years ago on Introduction

Beautiful use of everyday materials ! You have a nice balance of reuse and greenery going on; Great job !

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Catley

3 years ago on Introduction

These look great! I love the idea. Your directions are very easy to see and follow. Can you tell us what some of those plants are? I'm wondering how they get enough light, unless there is an unseen skylight up above, or they have a low light requirement.

I wish I could grow herbs this way in my kitchen, if a neighbor had not planted a big leafy tree/bush in front of the window that gets the most sun.

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jdc2450Catley

Reply 3 years ago on Introduction

haha that's funny because I wanted to do the same thing in my kitchen but there is a huge tree next to the window. As for the plants I just went to Lowes and found plants that didn't require direct sunlight.

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JeffM6

3 years ago on Introduction

What exactly does "and then used picture hanging hardware to hang the planter on the wall" entail? This is a pretty important step to miss? Please explain/details? Thanks. J