Mission Style Key Hanger Shelf From a $3 Pine 1x4

Turn a 3$ pine 1x4 into a functional mission style key hanger shelf that makes a good gift.

Step 1: Starting With a Single 1x4 Board of Pine

I had an 8 foot long 1x4 pine board lying around, I decided to start with that and build a key hanger shelf thing.

The requirements were that I should be able to hang 5 keyrings and have a little shelf for cell phones and gadgets above the keys.

I looked up the price of a similar 1x4 and you can get one for around 3$ at the Home Depot.

Now, to make the cuts I used my miter saw and cut pieces with the following lengths:

1 piece 13 inches long

1 piece 12 inches long

2 pieces 11 inches long

Thats a total of 47 linear inches out of the total length of 96 inches - a little more than half the board.

Step 2: Making All the Cuts and Removing the Rounded Corners

Use the miter saw to make the cuts and since my board had slightly rounded corners, I had to shave 1/8th of an inch off the sides of the boards.

I then drew the outlines of the side pieces - the 12 inch board will yield both side pieces as seen in the drawing.

The 13 inch board is for the top shelf.

Rip the 11 inch boards into one board of width 1 3/4 inches and one with 2 3/4 inches.

Use the remaining waste piece from the 1 3/4 inch cut to make the 3 small vertical pieces - 3 inches each.

Step 3: Make Curved Cuts Using a Scroll Saw or a Jig Saw

I used my scroll saw to make the curved cuts on the side pieces - the 3/4 inch pine board is about the limit of a scroll saw but it worked slowly but precisely. I also tried one piece using my jigsaw but it was tough, clamping one end and then the other to finish the cut.

Step 4: Template Routing All Side Pieces to Match the Master Piece

I sanded and perfected the first curved side piece and then used that as the master piece to use with my template routing bit - all side pieces end up identical this way. You can skip this step if you can live with slightly dissimilar side pieces.

Step 5: Gluing Up the Key Hanger Shelf - No Nails or Screws Used

I decided that this project piece will not experience a lot of stress - 5 keyrings hang off it, and the top shelf rests on the side pieces, so glue should be more than enough.

First, a dry fit to make sure everything lined up before I got messy with the glue.

I glued up the pieces and then clamped them up overnight. If you don't have clamps, you can use glue and screws but then you see the ugly screw heads on the sides. Maybe pocket hole screws would work, hiding on the backside of the key hanger shelf.

Step 6: Sanding Through the Grits

I used my belt sander with an 80 grit belt, my sheet sander with 150 grit sandpaper and then my big heavy Bosch Random orbital sander to sand to 220 grit. All weird corners were hand sanded with 220 grit.

After the 220 grit, the pine was very smooth to the touch, ready for the staining and varnishing.

Step 7: Staining

I used three different stains (did I mention I was making three identical keyhangers) to get some variety in the final products.

Varathane Traditional Cherry https://amzn.to/2QTVXIV

Varathane Dark Walnut https://amzn.to/2BJDbcO

General Finishes Java Gel Stain https://amzn.to/2BNTAwJ

Flood the surface and then wipe it off.

Step 8: Varnishing/Polishing

Wipe on poly is my preferred method of polishing projects.

Wipe on and remove the excess. Dries fast - you can usually do 2-3 coats in a day.

Since this project is not going to see much wear and tear, 3 coats of polyurethane should be enough to last a long time.

Step 9: Screw Golden Cup Hooks

Next step is to add cup hooks - I got a whole bunch of these cup hooks - mark off 5 equidistant locations and drill pilot holes before hand screwing in the hooks.

You can use any suitable hardware here - I just had these on hand.

Step 10: Brackets for Hanging From the Wall

I will use some right angle aluminium brackets under the horizontal shelf to fasten this to the wall.

Since I made three of these, I will give 2 away as gifts - I will include the angle brackets and drywall anchors plus screws along with them so that the recipients don't have to hunt down suitable fasteners.

Thats it - thanks for reading - this was a quick project but yielded some nice functional furniture.

Home Depot 1x4 Pine Board

Amazon Affiliate Links to all products referred in this Instructable:

Varathane Traditional Cherry https://amzn.to/2QTVXIV
Varathane Dark Walnut https://amzn.to/2BJDbcO

General Finishes Java Gel Stain https://amzn.to/2BNTAwJ

Bosch Random Orbital Sander

Dewalt 745 Table Saw

Miter Saw

Ryobi Sheet Sander

Ryobi Jig Saw

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    5 Discussions

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    earniejohn

    Question 10 days ago on Step 2

    This looks great and I am anxious to try it. Is there a pattern for the side pieces?

    2 answers

    Sorry, I don't have a pattern for the side pieces - you can see in the scroll saw photos I have drawn the shape of the side pieces by hand with pencil. If you zoom in on those, you can see the general shape I drew - I just made it up as I went, no template or design.
    The 12 inch board allows you to cut the two pieces - 3 inches widest point and 9 inches long arranged "head to toe" - minimizes the waste.

    Thanks! I will try my hand at free forming the shape. I am no artist, so we will see how it turns out.

    0
    None

    That looks really nice. I need to make one of these for my kitchen.