My Little Pony : PaperCraft Is Magic

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About: I'm a pharmaceutical Research & Development Chemist that has a passion for all things artistic

Intro: My Little Pony : PaperCraft Is Magic

WARNING! : THE REPETITIVE HAND MOTIONS REQUIRED FOR THIS PROJECT MAY CAUSE CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME AND MAY CAUSE SEVERE HEADACHES OR STRAIN YOUR EYES. REQUIRES A DASH OF EQUESTRIAN MAGIC & MODERATE TO STRENUOUS CONCENTRATION. CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN BEFORE ATTEMPTING!(just kidding!- I guess you can get a little headache if you over do it!)

Pinkie Pie is goreous, Apple Jack is amazing ...... but what results when you go into a papercraft laboratory and splice together Pinkie Pie and Apple Jack's DNA? Well this project has you covered. Ordinary printing paper reinforced with newspapers was used to do this project. Note this is NOT a replacement for cardstock - which, among other media is definately a better and more structurally stable way to do papercaft. This instuctable uses characters based on the critically acclaimed "My Little Pony : Friendship Is Magic" by Hasbro.

Step 1: Cutting and Gluing

Basically I was gluing the pieces together in such a way that the printed lines and the edge numbers were within the model and not visible on the outside.I was working from the ground up - starting with the legs and then working my way up to the head. This makes it easier to stand the model while working on it. I used a non toxic water based glue for joining the pieces together. Where necessary I reinforced some areas with tape from inside the model such that it was not visible from the outside. Many sources would recommend that you start from intricate to coarse - but I recommend you start from coarse to intricate as in so doing you will get the hang of the gluing process so that when you move to the finer details you will be better able to handle the intricacy. Having the PDF open will be a big help as you can use the search facility to find the location of the corresponding piece or edge that you need to cut out and glue.

Step 2: Mounting the Model + Adding Steel Structural Supports

Assuming that you have managed to assemble the legs and glue both the left and right legs together next step will be to find a way to mount the legs on a platform.In order to have some stability- I used some stainless steel rods and embedded them within the feet. Two were placed in the right foot, two in the left. Two of the wires go through the heels of the model and are taped to the base where the model is to stand. Two are embedded in the area under the foot where the toes end. A longer stiffer wire is embedded from in between the models legs to the base where the model stands. This wire is taped to the insides of the model to give extra strength. These steel reinforcements were necessary as the flimsy 80g/m2 paper I used was not particularly strong enough to support the structure on its own and needed 'help'. I'm sure for those of you who will make this model using card stock or other stronger media, minimal supporting structures if any would be needed.

Step 3: Magnetic Feet and Internal Structural Supports

At this stage you will notice the model is a bit hollow and if you touch it indelicately 'dents' will be left in the model. To combat this , while at the same time putting some old newspapers to good use, I stuffed the model with crumbled up newspapers. Cloth could be used instead of newspapers I suppose - in which case its a great use for old t shirts, old socks e.t.c. Though I only used cloth for stuffing the waist. Thats because I designed the model with an extremely small waist and an extremely 'generous' hipline - as such extra support was required at the waist if the model was to stand upright. There are however, other methods to give a papercraft model of this magnitude structural integrity. These include the use of fibreglass resin, liquid glass, wood glue e.t.c . Also i added magnets inside the model in both feet and in the tail so that the model can stand stable on a magnetic surface without tipping over.

Step 4: Adding On

By now its all a matter of building up and joining the pieces together and internally reinforcing some areas with tape where necessary. As the model gets higher you will need to be fixing areas that need fixing and adjusting your supporting structures accordingly.Keep on going. Piece by piece. Edge by edge. Don't worry if you lose track of what you're doing - in the end it will magically fit together. This is where the PDF comes in handy, search for the edge number you require and your PDF reader will show you the page and the position of the edge you need in no time.

Step 5: Painting the Entire Model Using Nail Polish.

For painting the model i used various colours of nail polish. some people might ask why i used nail polish to paint, i ask them why not. The most challenging part to this instructable is assembling the face. It has a lot of small pieces to cut out and glue together. Personally i was overwhelmed by the amount of detail in the eyes, lips and ears that I ended up improvising those areas without using the PDF guideline. I also had to improvise the apex of the bust. The bust is not as detailed as the face - but it is fairly detailed. For structural support the bust is stuffed with newspapers also and reinforced with tape in some areas.

Step 6: Exeunt Omnes

After loads more cutting, gluing and improvising - all will be done. All that's left is to find a nice place to show off your model.
congradulations - You've made it!

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