Plastic Wrap Sculptures!

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Introduction: Plastic Wrap Sculptures!

Sculptures made of plastic wrap and packing tape, how odd...

As I'm sure some of you, maybe many of you, have not seen a plastic wrap sculpture before, I will show you some pictures first.

Step 1: Materials

This project uses only a few cheap materials (depending on where you get them)...


Plastic wrap (What brand is up to you, some sticks better than others and sometimes you may not want that... so it's all up to you)

Packing tape (go for the clear packing tape for a nice clean look)

Scissors (it's not pictured but you need 'em)

An item to wrap (if it is your first/second try make sure to have something you don't mind getting cut a little. After you have some practice it is easier not to cut things)

Step 2: Wrapping...

The first real step is to wrap your model in the plastic wrap. Get EVERY nook and cranny. Believe me, if you don't you WILL regret it. It is nearly impossible to correct that mistake later on....

Do not worry about detail in this step, for now just get the plastic wrap around the model not too tight.

And remember, don't be afraid to wrap it twice!

Step 3: Packing Tape...

After you have double checked that is completely covered with the plastic wrap, bring out the scissors and the tape.

You will be taping everywhere on the model. Everywhere. This is another thing you don't want to muss up. If you don't get a spot the first time around you can come back with more tape. But after this step there is nearly no turning back.

Use your fingers to press down on the tape in certain areas where you want detail. The tape will typically stay depending on the brand.

If some tape is sticking out, feel free to just cut it off and tape over the area.

Step 4: Removing the Model...

Now that you have (hopefully) successfully finished all the wrapping, we need to remove the model. This is achieved by cutting a few simple lines in the wrap.

Cut a small hole in the plastic and cut through to create an opening. Depending on how complex your sculpture is, you may need more cuts to allow for easier removal. Just keep in mind, it may be easier to remove but it is harder to put back together with more cuts.

Step 5: Taping It Back...

In the previous step you cut up your sculpture and now you presumably have a mess of plastic that may or may not look how you want it to... This is how you put it back together.

Using just a small strip of plastic at a time, connect two corresponding sides of the plastic and place the tape on top. For better results, place your hand inside and press upward while the other hand presses downward on the tape.

Continue this process until it is all taped up.

Step 6: Finished!

Now you're finished! Put it somewhere fun!

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    56 Discussions

    0
    KOBUS HATTINGH
    KOBUS HATTINGH

    4 years ago

    I just put double sided tape on some bubble wrap and before sticking onto a model, clingwrap her or whatever you are making a mold from. Works well also. Here is a pot I made this way.

    DSC06463.JPG
    0
    exabopper
    exabopper

    6 years ago on Introduction

    So my daughter comes up to me and says, "Daddy, for my 6th grade science project, I need to make a model of a cell. It has to show the internal organelles, the nucleus, cytoplasm, and everything! And it's due next week! How can we make this?" I immediately said, "We got this. Plastic wrap sculpture for the win." I used several balloons, wrapped them and made an outside of about 8 layers of packing tape. Cytoplasm was wadded up plastic wrap with a sheet of plastic wrap over it to hold the wads together. Organelles I made with either more sculpture, or expanding foam, or painted pasta. Easy A+, and the teacher liked it so much, she kept it (which is why no photos)

    0
    Don LC
    Don LC

    Reply 6 years ago on Introduction

    You...are an AWESOME dad! It's great to have creativity in the house as kids. Even better when the parents are nerds :-)

    0
    TheJehosephat
    TheJehosephat

    Reply 6 years ago on Introduction

    That's so awesome! I love to hear stuff like this, I'm glad it worked out! What a brilliant use for these sculptures

    0
    pudgytaco
    pudgytaco

    7 years ago on Introduction

    How do you make a hand? I guess it'd be more challenging. But can you just wrap your hand up just like wrapping anything?

    0
    TheJehosephat
    TheJehosephat

    Reply 7 years ago on Introduction

    It'd be much more difficult, but it's certainly possible... I've only done mitten-like hands without fingers :P

    0
    FALCON4EVR
    FALCON4EVR

    8 years ago on Introduction

    My school did three of these, one of spiderman, and two others. i will post pictures later.

    0
    tinker234
    tinker234

    9 years ago on Introduction

    wow so do you wrap your self in buble wrap for the first one or what

    0
    TheJehosephat
    TheJehosephat

    Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

    Oh! You mean how did I do a sculpture of a human being? I answered this in an earlier comment, but here is the quote for you:

    It's a two person job at minimum and requires a LOT of care (it's recommended that you use a mannequin).

    The model is wrapped the same way as anything else, but one section at a time (arm, leg, torso, etc.).

    Continually ask about tightness and bloodflow! If it is too tight, it will be difficult to remove later.

    After wrapping, carefully (CAREFULLY) use scissors to remove.

    0
    tinker234
    tinker234

    Reply 9 years ago on Introduction

    ohh well a manquain would be better for my needs

    0
    WhyHello
    WhyHello

    9 years ago on Step 6

    OoO how do you do this with a person?

    0
    TheJehosephat
    TheJehosephat

    Reply 9 years ago on Step 6

    It's a two person job at minimum and requires a LOT of care (it's recommended that you use a mannequin).

    The model is wrapped the same way as anything else, but one section at a time (arm, leg, torso, etc.).

    Continually ask about tightness and bloodflow! If it is too tight, it will be difficult to remove later.

    After wrapping, carefully (CAREFULLY) use scissors to remove.

    0
    snotty
    snotty

    9 years ago on Introduction

    This is a great technique. I make hats like this.

    One of them is a Techno Viking Helmet with voice-activated glowing horns: https://www.instructables.com/id/be-ZIGGY-STARDUST-gone-SPACE-VIKING-Volume-Indica/

    0
    3.1415
    3.1415

    10 years ago on Introduction

    I like the pic with the legs hanging out of the ceiling! Check out my instructable using this concept to create a molding form for a "Tin Man" costume. https://www.instructables.com/id/Tinman-Costume/

    0
    themonorail
    themonorail

    10 years ago on Introduction

     ok, so, why not just fill it with helium and tie a string to it?