Project: Home Energy Saver

Hannah Robinson, Rachel Wier, Kaila Cleary

The use of an Arduino board and Matlab proved to be a simple and effective method to help homeowners optimize their energy usage. The simplicity and versatility of the Arduino board is surprising. There are so many add-ons and uses for the board, that it was difficult to choose what the best and most interesting type of assistance would be without choosing something extremely complex. Overall, we chose to focus on taking the temperature and being able to turn a fan on or off based on the temperature given.

Step 1: Parts and Materials Used

(1) Arduino Uno

(1) Breadboard

(12) Double-ended jumper wires

(1) 330 Ohm resistor

(1) Hobby motor

(1) NPN Transistor

(1) Diode

(1) DS18B20 temperature sensor

(1) Push button

Step 2: Problem Statement

Our project was to design a home energy saver using the Arduino and MATLAB. We knew a lot of people wasted energy keeping their house at a comfortable temperature when they were away, so that when they came home it would be at the temperature they wanted. Our goal was to help optimize this energy usage. We decided to use a temperature sensor to take the temperature of the room the Arduino was located in. The homeowner was then told the temperature and could choose to turn the fan on or off based off of their preferences. We also decided to add a graph of the weather so that the homeowner could see what the weather would be on that day.

Step 3: Giving the Breadboard Power

Here we begin by plugging the positive end of the board into the 5V and 3.3V slots in the Arduino and both negative sides of the board into the GND in the Arduino. This will supply power to the components in the board.

Step 4: Attaching the Push Button

We now attach the push button. Plug the push button into the board. The left side of the push button will connect to D10 on the Arduino and the right side of the push button will be connected to the ground. Another picture of the breadboard can be seen above.

Step 5: Attaching the Temperature Sensor

We will now begin constructing the other part of the circuit, the temperature sensor. Plug the temperature sensor into the board. A wire will be attached to the left side of the temperature sensor and will connect to the ground. Another wire will be attached to the right side of the temperature sensor and will connect to the power. A third wire will be connected to the middle of the temperature sensor and will then connect to A0 on the Arduino. A picture of the breadboard can be seen above.

Step 6: Attaching the Transistor

Next, we will now begin constructing another part of the circuit, the transistor. Plug the transistor into the board. A wire will be attached to the left side of the transistor and will connect to the ground. Another wire will be attached to the right side of the transistor and will connect to another part of the breadboard. A resistor will be connected to the middle of the transistor and then connected to another part of the breadboard. Another wire will then be connected from the resistor to D5 on the Arduino. A picture of the breadboard can be seen above.

Step 7: Attaching the Motor

Lastly, we will now begin constructing the last part of the circuit, the hobby motor. Plug the diode into the board with the wire that was connected to the temperature sensor on the right side. A second wire will be attached to the left side of the diode and will connect to the power. Then the red wire of the hobby motor will connect to the right side of the diode and the black wire of the hobby motor will connect to the right side of the diode. A picture of the breadboard can be seen above.

Step 8: Final Product

Your circuit is now ready to be coded and used. Here is a picture of our personal circuit.

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