Raised Garden Bed Made of Wood

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Intro: Raised Garden Bed Made of Wood

I love gardening and I love making things from wood.

This is how I make my simple raised beds. You just need wood, a chop saw, drill, and screws.

Step 1: Cut and Lay Out Your Pieces

I bought (2) 2 in. x 6 in. x 12 ft. #2 Prime Cedar-Tone Ground Contact Pressure-Treated Lumber

I bought 4 in. x 4 in. x 6 ft. Pressure-Treated Cedar-Tone Moulded Fence Post

I bought #9 x 2-1/2 in. Star Flat-Head Wood Deck Screws

I cut the 2 X 6's into 3' sections. And I cut the posts into (4) 11" pieces.

In the picture I laid out the lumber in the grass. Then I placed it on a flat surface and put it together without any screws.

I will be planting sunflowers in this raised bed. No veggies. Veggies and pressure treated wood are not a good combination.

Step 2: Screw It All Together

Since I'm placing 2 boards on top of each other to create a higher raised bed, I like to join the wood using these Simpson Strong-Tie 1-13/16 in. x 5 in. Tie Plate or whatever size you want. I do this because some of my raised beds have buckled from the weight of the soil inside. These plates help to hold it together.

Then just screw everything together with long deck screws.

Step 3: Project Completed

Drag your finished raised bed out to your garden area, leaving ample space between raised beds to fit a lawn mower.

When it's time to add soil, I'll get a shovel and dig, dig, dig inside the raised bed, get all that grass out of there, to make room for the soil.

Happy gardening!

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    13 Discussions

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    tony969

    23 days ago

    I've been making similar looking beds for a few years, but hadn't thought of using the tie-plates. Good idea.

    I'm sure you already know this, but if you are planting vegetables in these beds, it is a good idea to not plant them within a few inches of the wood. This is due to the potential leaching of the chemicals into the soil.

    To help prevent that, what I like to do is staple 6mil plastic on the inside walls. I'm not sure how well this works, but it gives me a piece of mind.

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    SusanYoung1982tony969

    Reply 22 days ago

    Good idea regarding the plastic on the inside walls. I'll probably just plant sunflowers.

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    swray48

    22 days ago

    Thank you! Simple, easy to follow directions. What is your approximate cost of this lumber, etc? And how does it compare to some ready-to-assemble kits? Thanks, and blessings.

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    SusanYoung1982swray48

    Reply 22 days ago

    Hi swray48 - I had a compost bin that I took apart and used the lumber from that to make the raised bed. Around $50 for the wood if you buy it new.

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    tmspro

    24 days ago on Step 3

    Susan: great post. Like the tie-plate suggestions.
    Another option for the grass: put several layers of carboard (two or three) or newspaper (three or four) down on to of the grass, then add soil. Grass will die, cardboard will decompose.

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    natpodu77

    23 days ago

    Don't think you want to grow veggies using pressure treated wood. I made similar beds using cedar fence and stakes at my local HD. Cedar is weather resistant and you don't have to worry about the leeching of harmful chemicals into the soil and crops.

    I do like your reinforcement though.

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    salmansheikhnatpodu77

    Reply 22 days ago

    Is there no way to safely use pressure treated wood? I have some large 2x6 or 2x8 that I was going to use for a tree house that I never built and thought to repurpose them for a raised bed.

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    salmansheikhnatpodu77

    Reply 22 days ago

    Okay, I'll go out and buy some cedar. I guess those PT boards are destined for a treehouse or bench, lol.

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    jimvandammenatpodu77

    Reply 23 days ago

    I'm a cheapskate, so I use pine trees I've chopped down. Or concrete blocks.

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    natpodu77jimvandamme

    Reply 22 days ago

    I built 3 boxes with the cedar fencing and stakes and screws and plastic landscape liner, mulch on the bottom and dirt for under $80. I left the stakes tall for points of attachement when I started growing seeds, I can cover for frost, also can attach fencing mesh to help plants grow or keep out critters.

    Will be making 3 more for next year.

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    wjcarpenter

    22 days ago

    I suppose anyone who cares already knows this, but there is a pretty good book called "Square Foot Gardening" by Mel Bartholomew. Actually, I just looked it up, and there are a bunch of different editions (and similar books by other authors). My copy is ~20 years old and says on the cover it's a companion book to the PBS series (which I never saw).

    Anyhow, it's got a lot of practical tips that will save you some trial-and-error time. It's probably nothing you wouldn't eventually figure out for yourself, but it can take a long time to find out you are wrong about some part of a garden. :-)