Repair Mouse With Double Click Problem

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Introduction: Repair Mouse With Double Click Problem

I have a Logitech wireless laser mouse and after a year or so of use, the left click button would double click every time I tried to single click something. As can be imagined, this gets frustrating very fast. So, being the tinkerer that I am, I decided to open her up and see if it could be repaired. Sure enough, It's a pretty simple fix, if you have some common tools and a teaspoon (edit:a tablespoon) of patience. There are some very small parts involved, so you will want to make sure you ware working in a well lit, clean environment so that any parts that are dropped can be easily found. I have now performed this fix for the third time and decided to take pictures this time to share with others who may find this useful. Each time the repair lasts about 6 months to a year before needing to be redone. I imagine at some point the piece causing the problem will break, at which time the mouse will need to be replaced (unless you're determined enough to try and source parts). Good luck with your repair, I hope this helps.

EDIT: There are quite a few comments about the difficulty of step 8. I would advise that you read through some of the comments for various approaches to completing that part of the repair.

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Step 1: Remove Batteries

If you are working on a wireless mouse, you will want to first open the battery cover, and remove the batteries from the mouse.

Step 2: Access Screws

On this particular model there are four screws which hold the mouse body together. These screws are located underneath the slide pads on the underside of the mouse. To remove the slide pads, gently pry the edge of the pad up with a small flat head screwdriver and peel it off. They are held in place with some sort of adhesive.

Step 3: Remove Screws

Remove the four screws with a small philips head screw driver.

Step 4: Open Her Up

At this point the top cover should lift off, revealing the mouse's innards.

Step 5: Locate the Click Mechanism That Is Causing the Problem (usually Left Click)

Depending on the mouse, there can be one, or several click mechanisms. This particular mouse has 6, with the left and right click being the main mechanism. The left click is the one causing me problems, and is likely the one you are looking for also. Locate this mechanism so we can continue the repair.

Before you proceed, be sure to notice the very tiny white button located on the top cover. This will fall loose when the cover is removed, and you will want to be sure you retain this piece to be reinstalled later.

Step 6: Open the Mechanism Box

The small rectangular box, contains the part we need access to in order to complete the repair.
To open the cover, use a small flat head screwdriver to gently pry the box cover away from the latch. This will allow the cover to lift slightly until you can do the same to the backside. Be careful not to pry too far or hard as it could damage the cover. The first time I performed this repair, I damaged the cover on mine, but thankfully it still stays in place, so there was no real harm done.

Be sure to retain the small white button to reinstall later.

Step 7: Locate, Remove, and Retension the Spring

This is the key to the repair. You must remove the very tiny copper tension spring from inside the click mechanism.

After you have removed this part, make sure the small tab has a decent curve to it. You can see in the picture how I use the screw driver to bend the curve while holding it down with my finger.

Then bend the tab up, so there will be more tension on it after it is reinstalled. You can see the before and after pictures showing how this will look.

Step 8: Reinstall Tension Spring

This is where the patience comes into play.  This is probably the most tedious and time consuming part of the repair.
To reinstall the tension spring, first attach it to the small hook at the front of the mechanism, as shown in the picture. Then use the flat head screwdriver to push the curved tab into place while keeping the rear of the spring under the small arm at the rear of the mechanism. The second picture shows what it should look like after being reinstalled. Notice the arrows pointing to the spots that need the most attention. You want all three to be correct or the mechanism will not operate properly. 

Step 9: Reassemble the Click Mechanism and Test

Next, you will need to reassemble the click mechanism. First reinstall the tiny white button into the mechanism cover (you did remember to find and set aside the tiny button right?).  The easiest way to do this is by dropping or placing it into the cover with a pair of tweezers. With one hand, pick up the cover  while keeping it upside down so the button stays in place. With the other hand, pick up the mouse body, turn it upside down, and push the cover back into place. Doing it this way will insure that the tiny white button stays in place while the mechanism is put back together.

At this point, before reassembling the mouse, set it down on the table, and give the tiny white button a few test clicks. You should notice that it is making a crisp click sound when pressed, and that it now springs back with more force than it did before. If you are not hearing and feeling a difference, you may need to open the mechanism back up and try retentioning the spring again.

If all seems well, than go ahead and put the mouse top back in place, reinstall the 4 main screws, and put the slide pads back in place. If there is not enough adhesive left to keep the slide pads on, you can add some more. Regular elmers glue stick has worked for me, or a dab of superglue would certainly do the trick.

Thanks for reading. I hope you now have a mouse that clicks properly.

64 People Made This Project!

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349 Discussions

1
dmiranda8
dmiranda8

5 years ago

I cant believe it worked. After some yelling and time I finally got the damn copper piece into place. THANKS!

3
csheng1
csheng1

6 years ago on Introduction

Hi, thank you very much for the great tutorial - I've tried it and my mouse is working fine. May I suggest that for step 8: Reinstall tension spring, you (1) place the curved tab (which is in the middle of the spring) at an angle on the tiny ledge of the metal piece on the mechanism first, then (2) hook the spring onto the front part of the mechanism, before finally (3) sliding the spring beneath the rear part of the mechanism?

I did not have much luck with the original action series of 2-1-3 until I tried 1-2-3 and the whole spring just slid into place while pivoting on the middle curved tab.

Hope this helps. And once again, thank you!

0
DavidinHawaii
DavidinHawaii

5 days ago on Step 6

Found it easier to use a craft knife to open the buttons up rather than a small screw driver. Repaired a Logitech M705 that had started to have the double-click issue but only kept it as an emergency but with the tutorial I was able to fix it and now keep it as a good working spare.

0
macolo
macolo

7 weeks ago

This worked. Adding the spring back in was tricky, but the overall repair took not more than one hour. These instructions rock! The trackball mouse is as good as new!

0
janvlug
janvlug

Tip 2 months ago on Introduction

See also the video and my comment here:
Basically, I sprayed a lot of contact cleaner spray after opening the switch housing to fix the double click issue.

0
BoogieMan2718
BoogieMan2718

3 months ago

Thank you! This worked perfectly for my Logitech G500s. You are correct, replacing the metal tab in the switch is difficult, but with some persistence it works out fine in the end.

0
mr.ante.sepulveda
mr.ante.sepulveda

5 months ago

Worked great, thank you!
Awaiting new batteries for my RAT9 as they both are bad, dies faster than I can charge them so I have to use G602 as a replacement until they arrive :)

0
davidhappleton
davidhappleton

5 months ago

Before dismantling your mouse use the software that came with it to swap the left and right buttons over. This will allow you to verify that the problem is with the switch and not with the driver.

0
abonam
abonam

5 months ago

Nice article!
By the way, my left switch was way beyond repair...but I did not give up!
My mouse has 3 switches, the middle one is the click on the week that I never use (ya, I'm THAT old school...).
So, I just switched the switches :-) because the middle one never been used in years. And now I have a working mouse again!

0
vibs2006
vibs2006

6 months ago

Very nice article however an additional video after this step by step description would transformed your article from good to a exceptional article :)

0
Vise_reVenAnt
Vise_reVenAnt

6 months ago

I was almost sure my Razer Imperator was dying....Thanks to you I saved it!
Putting the tension spring back to its position again required too much patience and too much tries....but in the end it worked :D

0
oshman6785
oshman6785

6 months ago

I had no problem with step 8 once I tried your steps. Hook in the front and slide the back end under and make sure the springy part in the middle is on top of the clip it engages into. Once the front and back are situated, use a small flat head screwdriver to just push and pop the spring into place.

Hopefully this is the fix I needed. So far it seems to be good.

0
bodomalo
bodomalo

6 months ago

I also only opened the button and cleaned the contacts. I used the screwdriver and scrateched around the contacts of the metal piece that goes up and down. Mouse click seems to work better now.
Took me only about 5 minutes.
But my click-mechanism hat the plastic pieces that hold it together on the side. They were hard to find and not easy to open.
Is there any way I can switch the click-mechanisms (my mouse has 4 of them), It has those 2 buttons to click up-down on websites, but I never ever use them. So I could re-use one of those buttons for the main left click-button... But I think they are hard to remove / re-install.

1
williamsharkey
williamsharkey

11 months ago

Thanks, this worked for fixing a logitech m570 wireless thumb ball mouse.

I did not take the copper thing off. I used a toothpick soaked in rubbing alcohol to clean where the copper switch touches. Only took a few minutes.

I wanted to be sure that the problem was fixed, so I made a web page that counted mouse clicks.

Before fixing it, when I pressed the left button down, it would register about 1 - 4 clicks. Sometimes it would not click at all. After, it only registered one click. I hope this page is handy for others who want to test their mouse: williamsharkey.com/mouse

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0
JanH172
JanH172

Reply 7 months ago

Thank you, very usefull :)

Thank you for this walk-through! I followed all your steps besides putting the spring back.

The step 8 for putting the spring back into place is very easy doing it another way. I will walk through it for anyone interested.

First put the loop (end of spring) on the edge of the assembly to hold it in place as stated in the walkthrough.
Next SLIDE the entire spring over the assembly until the spring curve is flat and the other side is under the restraining bar.
You should now have the entire spring fastened at points 1 and 3 with point 2 flat against its catch.
Now using a very small flathead screwdriver push gently on the flattened spring where it meets the catch. The idea is to get the flattened spring to settle into its catch without losing point 1 and 3.

That's how I did it. Hopefully that works for you!

0
tokiori
tokiori

8 months ago on Step 9

hi thank you, what an awesome, detailed tutorial, that's how i would do it! i have a magic mouse 2 i dropped on hard ground and now right click isn't working, or not the way i need it to. magic mice are their own thing, no screws etc. not sure i want to tackle this but $99.- sure doesnt sound appealing to me either. thanks again!

0
mztyree
mztyree

9 months ago

I followed the instructions and it worked! I actually had the patience to take the little copper spring out and bend it more as shown and replace it. The entire process took about 40 minutes. My one tip is: in order to hold the "very tiny white button" (mine was actually red, the mouse is a Tecknet BM306) in place when replacing the cover on the microswitch, I just placed the button inside the slot in the cover and held it there with a small piece of tape on the outside. That way I didn't have to turn the mouse upside down to replace the cover. Thank you for these instructions!

0
Gon1838
Gon1838

9 months ago

It worked.
Now i don't need to buy another mouse for a long time :v