The Best Dutch 'Stroopkoeken' Recipe

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About: Hello there! My name is Katrien and I am a ballet/contemporary dancer from the Netherlands. Besides dancing I enjoy cooking, baking, plants and lots of other stuff. Feel free to ask me anything :)

Mmmmm that's all I can say when I think about 'stroopkoeken'. It's my go-to Dutch treat when I fancy something sweet. I am moving to France in a few months and since they won't be available there I decided I wanted to make some of my own. That way, if I ever fancy them (which is often ;) ) I can just whip them up and have a little piece of Holland. Stroopkoeken would be translated as 'molasses or syrup cookies' and not many foreign people know about them. Yes, they have heard about the (also a favourite of mine) stroopwafels (molasses/syrup waffles) but not about these, which I think is definitely a shame..! So for all the non-Dutch people who have never tried these, and to all the Dutch people who want to make some themselves: here is my recipe for Dutch 'Stroopkoeken'.

Step 1: Gather Supplies

Step 2: Gather Ingredients

Next up: gather all the ingredients.

For the cookie part:

  • 300 grams all purpose flour
  • 200 grams of butter (room temperature)
  • 150 grams white caster sugar
  • 1 egg
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder

For the molasses part:

  • 60 grams of butter
  • 100 grams of brown caster sugar
  • 200 grams of apple molasses
  • 1 teaspoon of cinnamon

Step 3: Wash Your Hands

First things first, wash your hands and scrub all those germs off! :) I am using my self-made soap. You can find the instructable here .

Step 4: Preheat the Oven

Preheat the oven on 160 degrees Celsius or 320 degrees Fahrenheit.

Step 5: Measure Out Ingredients

What I like to do is to measure out all the ingredients in separate bowls before you really start the baking. This makes it very convenient and clear along the way.

Step 6: Put Cookie Ingredients in the Mixing Bowl

Now it's time to make the cookies. Start by putting the flour, white caster sugar, butter (200 grams), baking powder, salt and last but not least the egg in a mixing bowl. I like a sturdy glass one like these .

Step 7: Get Ready to Kneed

Get ready to use your hands. Roll up your sleeves!

Step 8: Kneading Time!

Knead all the ingredients together until it starts forming a ball. This shouldn't take too long. Make sure you don't over knead, this will make the cookies tough, which is the opposite of what you want.

Step 9: Wrap and Cool

Once your dough forms a ball wrap it up and put it in the fridge for at least half an hour. This will make the butter harden, which makes the dough way easier to handle in the next step. I used my self-made beeswax wraps (you can find the instructable here) , you can ofcourse also find them online . You could also use plastic wrap, but I try to minimize my plastic use wherever I can.

Step 10: Flour Your Surface

Waited for at least half an hour for the dough to cool? Good, now it's time for the next step: lightly sprinkle your surface with flour. Don't be too sparse though, the longer the dough is out of the fridge, the stickier it gets, so more chance that the dough will stick to your surface.

Step 11: Roll Out the Dough

Grab the dough out of the fridge, unwrap it and place it on your surface. Grab your rolling pin and roll it out until it's about 2 to 3 mm thick.

Step 12: Cut Out Cookies

Grab your cookie cutters and start cutting out some cookies! I used cookie cutters that used to be my grandfathers which I think was really nice. :) You can find similar ones here .

Step 13: Take Out In-between Dough

The next step is to carefully take out the in-between dough and put it back in the fridge. This way it can harden again, so the next load of cookies will be just as easy to handle as this one is.

Step 14: Cover Baking Tin

Cover your baking tin with parchment paper.

Step 15: Place Cookies on Baking Tin

Now carefully transfer the cookies on the baking tin. I used a pallet knife that once in a former life was used as a stucco knife, but as I know this is not a very common thing to have in your kitchen I recommend using a pallet knife like this one. ;)

Step 16: Put in the Oven and Set Timer

Put the cookies in the oven and set a timer for 15 minutes.

Step 17: Make the Second Batch

Whilst the first batch of cookies is in the oven roll and cut out the second batch.

Step 18: Check Check Check

Check your cookies once or twice during the fifteen minutes, especially in the end. Everyone has different ovens, so baking times might vary a little bit. If the cookies are golden brown they are done.

Step 19: Take Out of the Oven

Your cookies are golden brown? Time to take them out of the oven. And in goes the second batch of cookies. (don't forget to set the timer!)

Step 20: Place Cookies on Cooling Rack

I like to leave my cookies on the baking tin for a little while after they come out of the oven so they can set a little bit before I transfer them onto the cooling rack. This way there is a way slighter chance of breaking the cookies in the transfer process. In case your cookies are already quite dark because they were left a little too long in the oven I would take them of immediately though, by keeping them on the baking tin they keep on cooking from the downside a little more which can make them even darker.

Step 21: Melt Butter

Once the second (and last) batch of cookies go in the oven you can start making the molasses filling. Start by melting the butter (60 grams) over medium-low heat.

Step 22: Add Molasses Filling Ingredients

Now add the other molasses ingredients in the steelpan. (Apple molasses, brown sugar and cinnamon)

Step 23: Stir and Cook

Stir all the ingredients together and slowly let it cook. Keep on stirring as you don't want the mixture to burn. When all the sugar is dissolved turn off the heat and let the mixture cool off a bit. It is too hot and too runny to handle right away. By this time your second batch of cookies should also have been finished baking and taken out of the oven to cool.

Step 24: Assemble the Stroopkoeken

Almost done! Now the fun part, where it all comes together: assemble the 'stroopkoeken'. Start by smearing out the molasses on a cookie. Place another cookie on top and press down a little. Repeat until you used all the cookies.

Step 25: ENJOY!

You did it! You made Dutch 'stroopkoeken'. Now all is left is the final step: ENJOY them! I know I will for sure, especially when I will be living in France and I miss Holland a bit. (or in general, when I fancy them ;) )

If you have any questions feel free to ask me! And if you decide to make them, let me know what you think, I'd also love to see the results!

Katrienn is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon(.com, .co.uk, .ca etc) and any other website that may be affiliated with Amazon Service LLC Associates Program.

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    12 Discussions

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    mikpar

    27 days ago on Step 25

    I will definitely give these a try. I have a package of Stoopwafels in the panty. They are available here in the Seattle area. My mother was Dutch, and Stroopwafels were a favorite of her's. Do yo happen to have a recipe for the wafel ? Thanks

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    lschwartzmikpar

    Reply 26 days ago

    Where in Seattle? I have a Dutch friend in Edmonds who would send them to me. dank u heel vell.

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    mikparlschwartz

    Reply 25 days ago

    My sister gave them to me. She kept our mother supplied. But there were a few packages left unopened when mom passed away last year at the age of 94. My sister took them home, but then gave tow packages to me because, she said, she was eating too many of them. My good fortune! :)

    I was going to ask her where she got them. But now I see on the package that they came from Trader Joe's. If your friend is not familiar with Trader Joe's, you can tell her that there is one in Lynnwood, at 196th and Aurora, in the shopping center near the the Joann Fabrics. It is a new location. They used to be on the other side of Aurora. (Lynnwood borders Edmonds to the north and east. she should have no problem finding it.

    There is no guarantee they will have them in stock, but there are other TJ's in the area. The ones I have are in a blue and white can with the Trader Joe's brand printed on the can. So unless it is a seasonal item, there is a good chance they will have them.

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    lschwartz

    26 days ago

    I lived in Scheveningen 1974-1976 and loved stroopwafels but never encountered stroopkoeken; I wish I had. I finally found an importer into the US for stroopwafels but they had stopped importing them. Now, they are periodically available at Wawa (kind of like 7-11) stores in Maryland and Pennsylvania and I found them at Costco (a giant membership store chain) at Christmas. When they come again, I'll try and find the stroopkoeken from them. I don't cook so I'll have to enjoy them vicariously through your 'ible. It was very well done!

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    tmross4

    4 weeks ago on Step 25

    Is apple molasses the same as apple butter? Here in California, molasses is the product of making white sugar.

    2 answers
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    Gadishatmross4

    Best Answer 27 days ago

    I'm from Holland and I think she means " appelstroop", It's made by heating Apple Juice (and sugar) until it thickens.

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    Italiankiwiblog

    4 weeks ago

    We fell in love with these cookies when we visited Amsterdam a few years ago. I'm pleased to see that I can recreate them at home. I live in France and have never seen apple molasses. Is there something else I could use instead?

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    KatriennItaliankiwiblog

    Reply 27 days ago

    Thank you for your nice comment, glad you liked the cookies when you were in Amsterdam! I used apple molasses because this was the only molasses available in a glass jar (I try to use less plastic wherever I can). I am not sure if the right word to use in molasses or syrup, but 'normal' kitchen syrup (which I normally put on my pancakes) works perfectly fine as well!

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    ItaliankiwiblogKatrienn

    Reply 27 days ago

    That's good to know. I'll try it with maple syrup or golden syrup then. Thanks!

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    Gadisha

    27 days ago

    Lekker :p

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    jessyratfink

    4 weeks ago

    I adore your photos! They're so elegant.

    The filling sounds really delicious :)