The Ultimate Miter Saw Station // Router Table

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Hey! If you're too lazy to read the whole instructable, check out the video above!!

Step 1: Miter/Router Fence

At this point my Miter station is about 30% finished since I don't have the shelves installed and most importantly the miter fence and Router station! So when building one, I wanted to do something interesting.

Step 2: Making the Fence

To start my build, I got a pine board and used the miter saw to cut it to the length of my table. I then split it in two and attached it at an L shape. The height of the fence is about 11cm.

Step 3: Pivoting Fence

Once the simple fence was screwed together, I used my Miter saw's clamp to clamp the one side of the fence to make it pivot. This way I will be able to use it for the miter saw and the router at the same time!

Step 4: Building the Router Table

I started building the router table by going through a bunch of old stuff in my grandpa's garage, and found this piece of plastic, which looked like it was some type of window at some point in its life. I cleaned it up a bit, drew out the square I needed and cut it up with the jigsaw.

Step 5: Draw

Then I went over to the table and drew out the right dimensions.

Step 6: Route

Using the router, I carved out the indent for the plastic piece to fit flush into.

Step 7: Cut

I then used the jigsaw to cut an opening the size of my router.

Step 8: Drill

The huge advantage to a see-through square piece, is that you can see where to drill your wholes to attach the router!

Step 9: Paint, Glue, Attach

Once I had all my wholes drilled, I decided to paint the plastic piece a bright red so it would be easily noticeable and possibly act as a safety feature. I also through some glue in there just in case the screws ever decide to fail (which shouldn't happen)

Step 10: Attach Router

This step is quite self explanatory. Pick out your bit, insert the router and get to work!

Step 11: Test It Out!

Adjust the fence to the correct size, run your wood through. But make sure you use sharp bits! I'll probably end up adjusting the fence by making a pocket in it so that it can slide over the bit. That way the bit is on the inside and is covered up rather than sticking out. Either way, I'm pretty happy with the build. A lot of work shall be done on this table!

Step 12:

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    12 Discussions

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    hsitte00

    18 days ago

    Routers and router tables create a lot of chips and it is worthwhile if the fence includes a vacuum connection besides adjustable fence openings. I could give you some ideas but they would just be mine so I am providing this link to Lumberjocks with a search for router table fences so you can pick from a lot of options.

    http://lumberjocks.com/search_results?cx=017914489...

    Most of the people on this site are also very willing to help and you can join for free!

    You can also go to YouTube and search for videos on router table fences and see what's available there.

    Good luck and keep trying as we all do and did to get this far.

    7 replies
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    hsitte00hsitte00

    Reply 17 days ago

    Did my pointers provide any insight to your project?

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    v1nce_nthsitte00

    Reply 17 days ago

    I will be working on getting the vacuum attached to the fence, because it sure does make a lot of dust. Not so much chips that I'm worried about. The saw dust is what worries my lungs. So that will happen. But I wasn't able to find much on the adjustable opening, but I haven't looked enough due to these busy holidays. I'll definitely be doing more work when Christmas is all over with! But I definitely appreciate your care and insight:)

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    hsitte00v1nce_nt

    Reply 17 days ago

    Actually routers create more chips than dust when compared to sanders but a dust collection system is a good idea in either case. After 50+ years of woodworking, most of them inside or in my old basement, I have developed COPD which is no laughing matter. Now, when weather allows, I tend to do most of my woodworking outside.
    This video shows a fence with dust collection and adjustable bit window but it is a little over the top with other bells and whistles.


    This one is simpler and has both features.


    As with all DIY, shop built, solutions you can pick and choose how much you want to incorporate into you design.

    Take care buddy!

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    v1nce_nthsitte00

    Reply 14 days ago

    Thanks for all the great info! Hope you can get that COPD cured! You really got me thinking seriously about dust collection now. But it's unfortunate that finances aren't a small problem for me right now. With the way things are going, I might catch COPD before I install a decent dust collection system! Lol

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    hsitte00v1nce_nt

    Reply 13 days ago

    My COPD is more age related and smoking doesn't help. You really don't have to worry about that if you don't smoke especially when you are woodworking as I did both for over 50 years. One of the best things you can do is get a air cleaner for your work shop to remove the very fine dust that floats around for a long time. The fine dust causes the problems.

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    v1nce_nthsitte00

    Reply 13 days ago

    Ah ok! Sounds like a plan. Stay away from the cigs and I should be fine lol. But in some time I'll be working on some kind of dust collection system and will consider your advice:)

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    hsitte00v1nce_nt

    Reply 12 days ago

    There are of the hanging type air cleaner/filtration system available from many manufacturers or you can build your own, depending on your urgency and/or cost. The Lumberjocks site has reviews and DIY ones if you are ready to build one?
    I have been looking at one that suspends from the ceiling but I can't afford one right now.

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    hsitte00

    18 days ago

    I am not trying to be hyper critical as I have been using a router and router table for over 50 years and I just want to help you if I can.
    In the video, when you stated that the bit was dull it appeared that you were climb cutting and that is the only point I was trying to make.
    When the entire workpiece is between the fence and the bit, that is climb cutting, the router rotation is pulling the workpiece.
    Cutting an opening in the fence, like you stated is very desirable, but the opening must be width adjustable to allow for different size router bits otherwise the workpiece may try to "dive" into the opening due bit rotation.
    Again, I am just trying to help!

    1 reply
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    v1nce_nthsitte00

    Reply 18 days ago

    Aah okay! I understand now! And that's an interesting thought about the bit opening though. But I don't think I'll be able to make it width-adjustable so I'll try to make it as small as possible but at the same time fitting the largest bit I have. I'm fairly new to this routing thing so I got lots of learning to do. But thanks a lot for the advice!

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    hsitte00

    19 days ago

    It appears to me that you are doing climb cutting. That could be one reasons the bit seems to dull. Try cutting on the other side of the bit moving the wood in the same direction you did previously so you will be cutting conventionally.
    Looking from the top of the router table the bit is rotating counter clockwise and the wood should be fed into/against the rotation, NOT with the rotation. Climb cutting is rarely done on a router table.


    1 reply
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    v1nce_nthsitte00

    Reply 18 days ago

    I'm not sure I'm understanding you correctly, but I will be adjusting the fence so that the bit is between the fence and the workpiece. I don't know if that's what you're trying to say. But I am cutting against the rotation here:)