Tofu Jerky

93,443

147

80

Published

Introduction: Tofu Jerky

I went veg and missed jerky, so I tried this out and it actually turned out really well.
(It really does taste better than it looks.)

Step 1: Ingredients

 Tofu
Vinegar, either malt or apple cider
Liquid smoke
Hot Sauce
Soy Sauce
Honey
Veg Oil
Garlic Salt
Salt and Pepper

Step 2: Drain, Cut and Marinate

 Drain the tofu by wrapping the block in cloth or paper towels then place between two plates and put some weight on top ( a bag of flour or something about that weight) and let it sit for about 15-20 min. Cut the tofu into strips, then put them in a  zip-top bag. Then add the other ingredients, I just eyeball it, but, I would say about a table spoon of all the wet ingredients and 1/2 of the dry. Then close the bag squeezing out as much of the air as possible. Then put it in the fridge overnight.

Step 3: Prepping for the Oven

I don't have a dehydrator so I used the oven, if you have a dehydrator use that. Set the oven to 200, this takes a few hours so there's no reason to pre-heat. Put some parchment paper on a baking sheet and then put the tofu on top of that. 

Step 4: Cooking/Drying

 Put it in the oven and let it cook/dry for 4-6 hours flipping every hour. The time will vary depending on the humidity.

Step 5: Finishing

 When it's done it should look like it does below. I know it looks burnt and not very tasty, it's not burnt and it is tasty! You can change the ingredients to match your own tastes I just listed how I did it. Enjoy!

Share

    Recommendations

    • BBQ Showdown Challenge

      BBQ Showdown Challenge
    • Backpack Challenge

      Backpack Challenge
    • Stick It! Contest

      Stick It! Contest

    80 Discussions

    can a vegatarian eat honey? sometimes all the bees get killed for the honey, but most of the times they just take that "thing" out and poor the honey into pots i think, anyway, honey is the vomit of a bee :S

    19 replies

    Usually, vegetarians don't eat meat because of health issues. Vegans are the die hards who do not eat a hamburger because a cow doesn't get to sleep in a king size bed with a down comforter.

    So yes, this should be vegetarian friendly.

    Actually, a lot of vegetarians do it for ethical reasons. I went veg as a kid when I made the correlation between meat and death, but have no problem with free range eggs and grassfed milk because the animals aren't harmed. Factory farmind is an abomination, though. :(

    Oh and also it's really bad for the environment, in terms of land required and water used, meat just isn't sustainable. Milk and eggs are less bad, but still not the most sustainable of foods which is why veganism will eventually be practiced by necessity.

    Agree to disagree, Tigerstripe. While beef certainly uses a TON of resources, if you look at the water requirements for alternative vegetable PROTEINS, many are higher than chicken or pork. Crickets are not on the list, but they probably beat out everything else.

    Looking forward to making this recipe for my vegan gf, although I'll sub agave for the honey.

    Water_Footprint.gif

    Hi- I just wanted to say that animals are harmed in the egg and dairy industries- male chicks and calves are killed as they aren't useful- often the chicks are gassed or put into a macerator and the male calves have a sad, short life and become veal- this is the same for free-range or grass fed/organic farming sadly.

    Eggs that you eat commercially either free range, organic or mass produced are not fertilized there is no chicken/bird in there. Now if you were to go to Philippines there they sell fertilized eggs to eat...its called balut and its interesting but gross.

    thats not true, im vegatarian myself, a lot of my friend are vegatarian and i know 2 vegans, all of these people just love animals, i would like to be a vegan but my parents wont let me :P

    ... Your parents have a say wether you turn vegan or not? That's nice of you and all but that can't be the only reason bacause being a vegan is YOUR choice... Btw, I eat meat and love it. lol 8D....

    lol i know, but they wont cook vegan for me, its hard enough to cook vegatarian every day. i dont think milk and eggs are inportent enough to cook my own meal every day when my mom can do it for me, of course i will be a vegan when i leave the home

    Hi deathsmileyinc,

    You absolutely can learn to cook for yourself! Or at least to help and thus influence meal choice. Remember that even just reducing the amount of animal products you eat is a big help. I bet you could impress your parents by learning about nutrition. You can get this book from the library - if your local one doesn't have it ask for an interlibrary loan:
    Becoming Vegan: The Complete Guide to Adopting a Healthy Plant-Based Dietby Brenda Davis and Vesanto Melina

    And I'll also bet that you can talk them into making at least some meals entirely animal-free if you present them with great recipes you can help make. There are some great vegan cookbooks for kids, and here are some websites with information and recipes:

    www.101cookbooks.com/vegan_recipes
    http://theppk.com/recipes/ (See: This month's features)
    http://blog.fatfreevegan.com (not the same as fatfree.com)
    www.fatfree.com/cgi-bin/recipes.cgi?vegan
    http://seitanismymotor.com/
    http://veganyumyum.com/
    http://vegandad.blogspot.com/

    ive tried to talk with my family but my father, sister and mom wont give up meat :( ive convinced my little brother and some friends :) when i cook (one a week) it will be vegan, and i eat vegan moist of the times, but im not going to make a big deal out of eggs and milk cause its hard to replace them.

    most of the times i eat vegan. most of the times i eat pizza ones a week, (with cheese) i think i will change that :P

    I know this thread is old, but I wanted to chime in with a couple additional suggestions.

    The book Skinny Bitch is pretty awesome and is about 90% responsible for my wife and I going vegan to begin with. Plenty of good information and recipes in there.

    The Ultimate Uncheese Cookbook has a lot of good ideas for replacing cheese in your home cooked meals. There's a dilled havarti recipe in there that we use as a replacement for the Boar's Head dilled havarti that goes into our veggie pot pie recipe. Goes great in the pies or on a cracker.

    And on the topic of pizza, believe it or not, there are several really tasty vegan cheeses out there - Daiya, Follow Your Heart and Teese, to name a few. Check your local health food store or co-op or, if all else fails, veganstore.com for some. (Beware that buying perishables from veganstore.com will cost extra in shipping and the mandatory cold packs that they add to the order.)

    Good luck!

    edsobo,

    Thanks! I love The Ultimate Uncheese Cookbook, and Daiya is just incredible.

    Now for folks who aren't already vegan, these things don't taste exactly like cheese. But for those who choose not to participate either in the damage to the body that these foods cause, or the damage to the Earth that they also cause, and so aren't having cheese or meat anyway, some of the replacement products make being vegetarian or vegan a whole lot nicer.

    Another great product is Gardein. It could be better but it could be a whole lot worse. The previous generation of vegan meat analogues had better take notice, because it's now a lot easier to feed non-vegans with vegan foods.

    Also good timing on your note, because HealthyPlanet Long Island is about to have our 17th TurkeyFree Thanksgiving Dinner this Sunday: https://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=166733346679149 or http://www.healthy-planet.org/Series/index.asp

    Hi, Juggsy,

    Well it's usually less about the lack of king sized beds and more about how they are kept in horrible dirty feedlots where they often suffer infections and illness from overuse of antibiotics, and the way they are killed, often being dismembered while still alive and conscious . . . same for chickens and pigs and other animals that are "farmed" . . . also the impact of concentrated animal feedlot operations upon the environment (to name just a few possible reasons.) But hardly ever about beds or comforters.

    Two different answers:

    First, from someone I know and respect highly: Why Honey is Vegan: http://www.satyamag.com/sept05/greger.html

    Second, a thoughtful piece from the opposite end of the spectrum, which I also find compelling: Why Honey is Not Vegan: http://www.vegetus.org/honey/honey.htm

    If you don't eat honey for whatever reason you could most likely substitute agave nectar, maple syrup, or, heck, even a bit of sugar. 

    This looks great, I'd bet even my jerky-loving son would like it!

    i doubt it.  nothing compares to the taste of a reel strip of beef jerkey.  unless you count moose meat jerkey.

    Honey is not the vomit of a bee. honey is nectar that the bees expose to the air and condense it into what we know as honey. after that given that we don't take it from them they(the bees) store it as food. If it where vomit I really doubt that we would be eating it, that would be the equivalent of eating an owl pellet(owl vomit).